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Relative Clauses

Relative Clauses
Content How to form relative clauses Level: lower intermediate Relative pronouns Level: lower intermediate Subject pronouns or Object pronouns? Level: lower intermediate Relative adverbs Level: intermediate Defining relative clauses Level: lower intermediate Non-defining relative clauses Level: upper intermediate How to shorten relative clauses Level: intermediate Exercises and Tests Exercises and tests on relative clauses We use relative clauses to give additional information about something without starting another sentence. How to Form Relative Clauses Level: lower intermediate Imagine, a girl is talking to Tom. A girl is talking to Tom. That sounds rather complicated, doesn't it? Do you know the girl … As your friend cannot know which girl you are talking about, you need to put in the additional information – the girl is talking to Tom. Do you know the girl who is talking to Tom? Relative Pronouns Level: lower intermediate Subject Pronoun or Object Pronoun? the apple which is lying on the table

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Participle Clauses 1 Reduced Relative Clauses (Download this page in PDF here.) (Click here for information about participle adjectives.) We can use participle clauses after a noun in the same way as relative clauses. ESL Beginner - Level 1 Revision Game ESL Interactive Fun Games Here we have the games carefully laid out for you. Follow the links to browse the variety of games offered. This is only the directory for interactive games and exercises. Our ESL fun games here include : Snakes and Ladders, Hangman, Spelling games, Wheel of Fortune, TV Games(Betting Game), Mazes, Memory Games, Matching exercises, Sequencing exercises, Picture Quizzes, Catch it and more.

English Grammar Explanations - Relative clauses Relative clauses are clauses starting with the relative pronouns who*, that, which, whose, where, when. They are most often used to define or identify the noun that precedes them. Here are some examples: Use of English: Tenses Kangaroo injures Australian politician May 18, 2013 A kangaroo (1)(injure) Australian politician Shane Rattenbury in the Australian capital, Canberra, on Thursday. Mr. Rattenbury (2)(take) a morning jog in the Canberra suburb of Ainslie when the kangaroo (3)(surprise) him, and in the ensuing confrontation Mr.

Sentences: Simple, Compound, and Complex A common weakness in writing is the lack of varied sentences. Becoming aware of three general types of sentences--simple, compound, and complex--can help you vary the sentences in your writing. The most effective writing uses a variety of the sentence types explained below. relative clauses 1. The relative pronouns: The relative pronouns are: We use who and whom for people, and which for things. We use that for people or things. Upper-intermediate use of English - Exercise 3: Kangaroo injures Australian politician Kangaroo injures Australian politician Saturday, May 18, 2013A kangaroo injured Australian politician Shane Rattenbury in the Australian (1), Canberra, on Thursday. Mr. Rattenbury was taking a morning (2) in the Canberra suburb of Ainslie when the kangaroo surprised him, and in the ensuing (3), Mr. Rattenbury was scratched several (4) on the leg. By Mr Rattenbury's (5), the kangaroo was an eastern grey kangaroo, which is a common (6) in Australia.

English Grammar Pill: How to use the future tenses correctly Many of you will know that I am a huge fan of mind maps and infographics. I think they are a colourful and imaginative way of showing language points whether they are grammar or lexis. I haven’t had the time to create my own mind maps, however I have made good use of the excellent resources available from my creative fellow teachers to help me with my posts. And today is no exception. During my research for this post, I came across this wonderful mind map created by Blog Educativo. LearnEnglish Teens We use relative clauses to describe or give extra information about something we have already mentioned. We often use relative pronouns (e.g. who, where, that, which, whose) to introduce relative clauses. What are relative clauses and why do we use them? A clause is a group of words containing a verb. Relative clauses are a way of giving more information about a person, thing, place, event, etc.

Upper-intermediate use of English - Exercise 3 Woman gives birth on New Jersey PATH train Tuesday, January 17, 2012A New Jersey woman, 31-year-old Rabita Sarker, gave birth on a moving Port Authority Trans-Hudson (PATH) train yesterday morning. She and her husband Aditya Saurabh were heading (1) St. Luke's-Roosevelt Hospital in Manhattan (2) a "practice run". She gave birth (3) the Journal Square and 33rd Street stations at 9:49 am ET.

ESL Fun Grammar Games, ESL Interactive Grammar Quizzes Grammar Interactive games - Free online kids ESL games, free Powerpoint, grammar flash games, games for kids, ESL grammar games, ESL grammar fun games, Interactive games & quizzes. Play ESL grammar games, ESL games for kids, learn grammar words with English words. Enjoy ESL puzzles & ESL activities for English language learners. Play interactive fun games at ESL Puzzles.

Advanced English - Grammar Test 1 She shouldn't have broken that glass. Correct IncorrectBut I did do my homework! Correct IncorrectWhere is the book what I got for my birthday? Correct IncorrectWalking in the garden, it began to rain. Correct IncorrectWe were to have tea here. Correct IncorrectShe is a most energetic woman. Learn English tenses through pictures with examples Present Tenses | Past Tenses | Future Tenses | Examples The Present Tenses Present Simple Present Progressive/Continuous Present Perfect Simple

Tenses I can't find my dictionary; I wonder whether Mary _____ it now. have had is having hasI'm sorry, I can't talk to you any longer because I _____ dinner. was making make 'm making 've madeWhile everyone else _____, she _____ quietly in the kitchen. laughed - cryed laughed - was cried was laughed - cried was laughing - was cryingThat house is in a terrible state!

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