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Peru Bans Monsanto and GMOs

Peru Bans Monsanto and GMOs
The first time I ever tasted a real tomato, I was in Cusco, Peru. I had picked them up at a Farmer’s Market, bought them from an old lady with wizened wrinkles and sun-browned skin. She’d carried a basket of them to market on foot from her scrap of land somewhere far down the mountain. It was a revelation — heaven and sunlight on my tongue! I never knew tomatoes could pack such flavor. I fell in love with the country and it’s people, the Quechua indians who are the remnants of the once proud Incas. Thanks to the indomitable spirit of that people, a ten-year ban on GMOs takes effect this week in Peru! Stephanie Whiteside reports, Peru’s ban on GMO foods prohibits the import, production and use of genetically modified foods. The victory is a long time coming. The decree banning GMO foods was drafted in 2008. A study done in April of 2011 by the Peruvian Association of Consumers and Users (ASPEC) tested 13 products purchased in major supermarkets and shops in Lima, Peru. Why 10 years?

http://www.foodrenegade.com/peru-bans-monsanto-gmos/

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