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David Sibbet

Related:  Culture Visuelle / Pensée Visuelle

Vision Statement (HBR) Text by Daniel McGinn; illustration by Stephanie Crowley For a big client meeting in April, Accenture senior manager Mark Papia hired a type of practitioner he’d never encountered before: a “graphic recorder.” During the session, artist Julie Stuart drew large murals depicting the participants’ discussion on 4-foot-by-8-foot sheets of paper. The goal: to help people make connections and better recall key points. “The artwork generated a tremendous amount of interaction,” Papia says. Graphic recording—also called visual facilitation—has been around since at least the 1970s, when it was popularized by a group of San Francisco architects. Does It Work? Professor Martin Eppler of the University of St. However, Eppler’s research suggests that software programs that let participants create their own visual representations—Let’s Focus or SmartDraw, for instance—may be more effective than a pricey artist’s handiwork. What Companies Say Companies using the technique include HP, Dell, S.C.

Strategies for sharing visual information with others David Sibbett, in his excellent new book, Visual Meetings: How Graphics, Sticky Notes & Idea Mapping Can Transform Group Productivity, shares a number of tips and strategies for sharing key charts, maps and diagrams with meeting participants. Doing so helps them to retain the information discussed (a concept called “group memory”) and what they agreed to during the meeting. It also provides a sense of continuity from one meeting to the next. In the book, Sibbett shares a number of ways of sharing these visual outputs with others in print and digitally. While he is talking mainly about hand-drawn charts, diagrams and visual maps, these strategies also apply to mind maps used to capture the ideas and decisions from meetings: In print Online sharing Photograph the key charts, diagrams and maps generated during the meeting, process them to reduce their size and resolution to reduce their file sizes and then e-mail them to the meeting participants as JPG images. Isn’t this a lot of work?

Sketch Note Grove Copyright Policy The Grove’s models and templates are the intellectual property of The Grove Consultants International and are based on best practices drawn from more than thirty years of fieldwork. The Grove is committed to sharing its ideas, processes, and tools in order to foster collaboration, and while we strive to make these easily accessible, only authorized licensees may use our proprietary information and materials. Such licensees must acknowledge The Grove as their source by displaying a Grove copyright notice and may reproduce such proprietary information only with our express written permission. Any unauthorized reproduction or use of our copyrighted material without The Grove’s express written permission is a violation of U.S. copyright law. If you wish to use our copyrighted material, we are happy to assist you with a purchase or discussion of an appropriate licensing arrangement.

Happiness ‘wave’ crests at retirement U. QUEENSLAND (AUS) — People are at their happiest at retirement age and their most miserable in their geriatric years, according to a new study that shows how happiness changes over a lifetime. The study also debunks the idea of the middle-age blues, blaming an over-representation of unhappy respondents in previous surveys. Collecting data from more than 60,000 people in Australia, Britain, and Germany, researchers found people were happiest as they entered retirement age (55-75), and most miserable close to death (80-90). “We all strive toward happiness, but we wanted to find out at what point in life we actually reach this goal,” says Tony Beatton of Queensland University of Technology. “Our interpretation of these findings is that individuals over 55 no longer have unrealistic expectations of what their life will be like and simply enjoy their reasonable health and wealth, leading to a marked surge in happiness. More news from the University of Queensland:

John Ward Everyday Venn The Grove | Ideas & Resources | Video Library Copyright Policy The Grove’s models and templates are the intellectual property of The Grove Consultants International and are based on best practices drawn from more than thirty years of fieldwork. The Grove is committed to sharing its ideas, processes, and tools in order to foster collaboration, and while we strive to make these easily accessible, only authorized licensees may use our proprietary information and materials. Such licensees must acknowledge The Grove as their source by displaying a Grove copyright notice and may reproduce such proprietary information only with our express written permission. Any unauthorized reproduction or use of our copyrighted material without The Grove’s express written permission is a violation of U.S. copyright law. If you wish to use our copyrighted material, we are happy to assist you with a purchase or discussion of an appropriate licensing arrangement.

Julie Stuart Think Global / Act Local & Communicate Digitally / Connect Analogue - A 360 Degree View of Thinque's Solutions Recently, we have had the privilege and fortune of connecting globally and locally with multinational organisations in a diverse range of markets. Technology combined with future-minded human connectedness and connection is making this possible. Recent projects we have been working on have included a national 'Thought Leadership and Social Media Marketing' roadshow for one of the world's leading financial services organisations, scenario planning with Australia's leading bank, a 'leadership styles' program with an American pharmaceutical company, employer branding advice for one of the world's thought leading HR companies, executive coaching with pharmaceutical leaders, and an international innovation roadshow with an American-Japanese printing and digital solutions provider. Given the depth, breadth and global nature of these programs, we thought it apt to visually demonstrate some of the services and solutions that we offer at Thinque.

Rob Benn Wikipedia Illustrated | Drafting a new path towards visual free culture

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