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David Sibbet

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Vision Statement (HBR) Text by Daniel McGinn; illustration by Stephanie Crowley For a big client meeting in April, Accenture senior manager Mark Papia hired a type of practitioner he’d never encountered before: a “graphic recorder.” During the session, artist Julie Stuart drew large murals depicting the participants’ discussion on 4-foot-by-8-foot sheets of paper. The goal: to help people make connections and better recall key points. “The artwork generated a tremendous amount of interaction,” Papia says. Graphic recording—also called visual facilitation—has been around since at least the 1970s, when it was popularized by a group of San Francisco architects. Does It Work? Professor Martin Eppler of the University of St. However, Eppler’s research suggests that software programs that let participants create their own visual representations—Let’s Focus or SmartDraw, for instance—may be more effective than a pricey artist’s handiwork. What Companies Say Companies using the technique include HP, Dell, S.C.

Strategies for sharing visual information with others David Sibbett, in his excellent new book, Visual Meetings: How Graphics, Sticky Notes & Idea Mapping Can Transform Group Productivity, shares a number of tips and strategies for sharing key charts, maps and diagrams with meeting participants. Doing so helps them to retain the information discussed (a concept called “group memory”) and what they agreed to during the meeting. It also provides a sense of continuity from one meeting to the next. In the book, Sibbett shares a number of ways of sharing these visual outputs with others in print and digitally. While he is talking mainly about hand-drawn charts, diagrams and visual maps, these strategies also apply to mind maps used to capture the ideas and decisions from meetings: In print Online sharing Photograph the key charts, diagrams and maps generated during the meeting, process them to reduce their size and resolution to reduce their file sizes and then e-mail them to the meeting participants as JPG images. Isn’t this a lot of work?

- PORTO - Publications Open Repository TOrino Sketch Note Grove Copyright Policy The Grove’s models and templates are the intellectual property of The Grove Consultants International and are based on best practices drawn from more than thirty years of fieldwork. The Grove is committed to sharing its ideas, processes, and tools in order to foster collaboration, and while we strive to make these easily accessible, only authorized licensees may use our proprietary information and materials. Such licensees must acknowledge The Grove as their source by displaying a Grove copyright notice and may reproduce such proprietary information only with our express written permission. Any unauthorized reproduction or use of our copyrighted material without The Grove’s express written permission is a violation of U.S. copyright law. If you wish to use our copyrighted material, we are happy to assist you with a purchase or discussion of an appropriate licensing arrangement.

John Ward Everyday Venn Home On April 6, 1994 Gunter Pauli arrived in Tokyo at the invitation of Heitor Gurgulino de Souza, then Rector of the United Nations University who with the support of the Japanese Government decided to create a think tank which was to imagine a competitive business model in a world guided by the Kyoto Protocol. Twenty years later, the philosophy of zero emissions, where waste is converted to revenues, and unused yet widely available resources are cascading into a chain of value generation, can look back at nearly 200 implemented projects, the generation of €4 billion in investments and an impact as a concept that created to an estimated 3 million jobs. The most widely copied project is the farming of mushrooms on coffee (+1,000), the most advanced is the biorefinery with the inauguration of the first and second phase in Porto Torres, Italy in a few months. After all, whatever we pioneer, we need to inspire the next generation, pioneering beyond what we could ever imagine.

The Grove | Ideas & Resources | Video Library Copyright Policy The Grove’s models and templates are the intellectual property of The Grove Consultants International and are based on best practices drawn from more than thirty years of fieldwork. The Grove is committed to sharing its ideas, processes, and tools in order to foster collaboration, and while we strive to make these easily accessible, only authorized licensees may use our proprietary information and materials. Such licensees must acknowledge The Grove as their source by displaying a Grove copyright notice and may reproduce such proprietary information only with our express written permission. Any unauthorized reproduction or use of our copyrighted material without The Grove’s express written permission is a violation of U.S. copyright law. If you wish to use our copyrighted material, we are happy to assist you with a purchase or discussion of an appropriate licensing arrangement.

Julie Stuart Rob Benn Wikipedia Illustrated | Drafting a new path towards visual free culture

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