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Cubit's Organic Living » How to: Save Heirloom Tomato Seeds

Cubit's Organic Living » How to: Save Heirloom Tomato Seeds
Saving your own tomato seeds is rather fun and has all sorts of benefits. Preserving heirloom seeds, ensuring a supply of your own favourites for next year, helping protect seed diversity, making a giant mess of stinky fermenting goo, it’s all there! It’s also pretty easy. As part of our seed selling business we save fairly large quantities of tomato seed but the process is the same whether you are saving from a pile of heirloom tomatoes or from a paticularily tasty one you just sliced up for lunch. First things first, you need to get your tomato seeds out of the tomato. You can slice them in half, in quarters, scoop some out of the one you’re eating or just use my preferred method: Squishing. Next the seed pulp is ready to be combined with water in a container. Make sure to label each variety as you go as tomato seeds all look very similar and the coloured pulp is going to break down. Place them out of direct sunlight and walk away for a few days. Now things will start to ferment.

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How To: Plant Seeds Using Eggshells We were excited when our Sprout Robot alert went off that it was time to start broccoli seeds indoors this weekend for our zip code. With the move and being in the midst of colder months, we are seriously lacking in the gardening department, except for our avocado sprouts (which we have an exciting update on coming tomorrow). We located our organic broccoli seed packet from last year's garden and hit up our gardening Pinterest boards (mine & hers) where we've been collecting ideas for creative planting all winter. We had one particular idea we'd seen pinned in mind and couldn't wait to try for ourselves — eggshell seed planters. Evidently, eggshells make the perfect size seed starters, are natural, biodegradable, can be planted directly into the soil after being cracked a little, and supply nourishment to the plant and surrounding soil (not to mention they're free). After saving the shells from this week's eggs, we set out to make our eggshell planters.

How to Save Seeds – Save Garden Seeds – Save Vegetable Seeds If you planted heirloom seeds this year in your garden and think you are done harvesting now, you are wrong! today we are going to learn all about how to save seeds. To start, we have to know the difference between the types of plants and seeds you planted in the first place in your garden. Hybrid Seeds - Hybrid Seeds are bred to be different than their original plant. How 1 MILLION Pounds Of Organic Food Can Be Produced On 3 Acres By Andy Whiteley Co-Founder of Wake Up World The quality and accessibility of our food supply is a mounting issue today. With GMOs, chemical pesticides and low-nutrition processed foods now commonplace in the mainstream supply, taking control of your own food supply is one of the smartest things you can do – for your health and for your hip pocket.

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The 16 Best Healthy, Edible Plants to Grow Indoors From farmers’ markets and Community Supported Agriculture, to urban farms and rooftop gardens, to produce delivery services, more and more people across the U.S. are embracing farm-fresh food. And for good reason: Locally grown produce tends to be better for the environment and for local communities than its store-bought counterparts. Growing food at home also ensures that growers know exactly where their food comes from and how it was grown (no need to worry about deceptive food labeling). If you’re not whipping out the pruning shears yet, consider this: Learning new skills is good for our brains.

Permaculture Design for Small Farms and Homesteads - Sustainable Farming Conventional agricultural ecosystems (i.e., farms) are inherently fragile: Their productivity can be sustained only if fossil fuel subsidies, in one form or another, are employed as inputs. Most farms entail, as well, other very serious environmental costs. Clearly, we need to create new food raising systems that will conserve soil, water, and nutrients ... minimize the use of fossil fuels, chemical fertilizers, and synthetic pesticides ... and lead to regionally self-reliant food systems. Alternative farming practices—known variously as organic, biological, or biodynamic methods—come closer to meeting such a criterion of sustainability. Nationwide, an estimated 30,000 farmers now rely on crop rotation, animal manures, legumes, green manures, mechanical cultivation, mineral-bearing rocks, and biological pest control to maintain soil productivity and tilth, supply plant nutrients, and control insects, weeds, and other pests.

Maya Mountain Research Farm Maya Mountain Research Farm in Beliz has this great oven they made.... It is used for nightly pizza! Here is a nice how-to on building such a great oven: Below Photo Shared by Facebook's The Year Of Mud and is a good example of what you might do in a home that is just gorgeous too! Maya Mountain is involved in this if you want to go: Vermiculture: How To Build A Worm Bin the Cheap and Easy Way By Gaye Levy Contributing Writer for Wake Up World A couple of weeks ago I wrote about using worms to create compost. The official term for this is “Vermicomposting” and the great thing about it is that it is clean and tidy and does not take up a lot of space. 10 Plants That Repel Garden Insect Pests Please Share This Page: Google + stumbleupon tumblr reddit If you are a first-time visitor, please be sure to like us on Facebook and receive our exciting and innovative tutorials on herbs and natural health topics!

Bamboo Structure Design at Assembly Room: Roof Bamboo Design – Modern Architecture Building Design Architecture, Bamboo Structure Design at Assembly Room: Roof Bamboo Design The awesome image posted by Alicia Giselle in Architecture arranged is Roof Bamboo Design image over. It is a an element of Bamboo Structure Design at Assembly Room content from overall 13 images which is grouped Architecture

Urban Farming Guidebook: new resource « Milkwood: urban & small farm living skills The Urban Farming Guidebook is a free pdf resource for helping local governments to plan the growing of food in their cities. Given that we’re all about bottom-up action, we feel that it’s best placed in the hands of potential growers, so they can get on with creating local food systems! And that means you. This guide was written for Canadian councils in BC, but that doesn’t make it any less interesting, or useful, for the rest of us. There’s 4 case studies of successful urban farms in BC, and plenty of inspiration and workable ideas for more… “Verticrop (above) is a technology that utilizes suspended hydroponic tray systems on a conveyer system to grow leafy greens. Perennial Vegetables: Years of Bounty Perennial vegetables—crops that you plant just once and harvest year after year—are relatively rare in North American gardens. With the exception of asparagus, rhubarb and artichokes, most gardeners are probably unaware of the tasty, extremely low-maintenance bounty that can be harvested when many annual crops aren’t available. A Brief History of Perennial Crops According to Perennial Vegetables by Eric Toensmeier, most North American gardening and farming traditions come from Europe, where there are very few perennial crops except fruits and nuts. Cold and temperate Eurasian agriculture centered around livestock, annual grains and legumes, and early European settlers to North America simply brought their seeds and their cultivation methods with them, including draft animals for plowing up the soil every year.

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