background preloader

LE CERVEAU À TOUS LES NIVEAUX!

LE CERVEAU À TOUS LES NIVEAUX!
Related:  neuro-Mindsight

Digital Anatomist Interactive Atlases Structural Informatics GroupDepartment of Biological StructureUniversity of Washington Seattle, Washington, USA Atlases Content: 2-D and 3-D views of the brain from cadaver sections, MRI scans, and computer reconstructions.Author: John W. SundstenInstitution: Digital Anatomist Project, Dept. Content: Neuroanatomy Interactive Syllabus. Atlas was formerly available on CD-ROM (JAVA program running on Mac and PC platform). Content: 3-D views of thoracic organs reconstructed from 1 mm cryosections of a cadaver specimen provided by Wolfgang Rauschning.Authors: David M. Atlas was formerly available on CD-ROM. Content: 2-D and 3-D views of the knee from cadaver sections, MRI scans, and computer recontructions.Author: Peter Ratiu and Cornelius RosseInstitution: Digital Anatomist Project, Dept. FAQHelp on Program UseSoftware Credits and CopyrightPrivacy and advertising policiesAbout the Structural Informatics Group

Words | Liespotting 10 Ways Liars Use Words To Obscure the Truth Lying is hard work. Daunting as it may seem to keep track of all the possible signs of deception—facial cues, gestures, leg movements—think of how difficult it is to be the deceiver. It’s so difficult to keep a false story going that you’d think it would be easy to catch a liar in the act. So what are we to do? Here are 10 common ways that liars use words to obscure the truth, so you can be on guard for deception: Liars will repeat a question verbatim. Liars avoid or confuse pronouns. Even without the benefit of being able to watch body language and facial expressions, the careful listener can do a fair bit of liespotting just from the words liars choose to use. Mark Vernon Do you ever get the feeling that something went wrong? What with credit crunches, wars, congestion charges, and unemployment, it is natural to hark back to less complicated times. In this witty and inspiring book, Mark Vernon does just that. However, we are not talking about the 1980s – try 400BC! Filled with timeless insight into life, relationships, work and partying, Plato's Podcasts takes a sideways glance at modern living and presents the would-be thoughts of Ancient Philosophers on various topics central to our 21st century existence. From Plato on podcasts to Epicurus on bottled water, this is a funny but profound take on what life means today (and two thousand years ago). 'Bravo! ‘Ancient wisdom goes modern in this unique book. ‘Mark Vernon has an unparallelled ability to convey profound philosophical ideas in a manner that is both accessible and personal but also rigorous and challenging.

Neurotechnology | High Resolution EEG | Neuroimaging Artistic and creative expression - Use your thoughts, feeling, and emotion to dynamically create color, music, and art. Life changing applications for disabled patients, such as controlling an electric wheelchair, mind-keyboard, or playing a hands-free game. Games & Virtual Worlds - Experience the fantasy of controlling and influencing the virtual environment with your mind. Play games developed specifically for the EPOC, or use the EmoKey to connect to current PC games and experience them in a completely new way. Market Research & Advertising - get true insight about how people respond and feel about material presented to them. Included Free with the Emotiv EPOC: EmoKey EmoKey links the Emotiv technology to your applications by easily converting detected events into any combination of keystrokes.

10% of the Brain Myth Let me state this very clearly: There is no scientific evidence to suggest that we use only 10% of our brains. Let's look at the possible origins of this "10% brain use" statement and the evidence that we use all of our brain. Where Did the 10% Myth Begin? The 10% statement may have been started with a misquote of Albert Einstein or the misinterpretation of the work of Pierre Flourens in the 1800s. Perhaps it was the work of Karl Lashley in the 1920s and 1930s that started it. The Evidence (or lack of it) Perhaps when people use the 10% brain statement, they mean that only one out of every ten nerve cells is essential or used at any one time? Furthermore, from an evolutionary point of view, it is unlikely that larger brains would have developed if there was not an advantage. Finally, the saying "Use it or Lose It" seems to apply to the nervous system. So next time you hear someone say that they only use 10% of their brain, you can set them straight. "We use 100% of our brains."

6 People Who Gained Amazing Skills from Brain Injuries #3. Man Survives Stroke, Becomes Graphic Artist Ken Walters' story begins with a ridiculous run of bad luck that started in 1986, when he got into an accident that broke his back. That left him bedridden and in pain for an entire year, and unable to walk ever again. Later, he was actually kicked out of his new house by the government -- then charged 5,000 pounds (nearly $8,000 in 2011 dollars). The stress ended up giving him two heart attacks. Photos.comWe're just sayin'. Walters didn't know it at the time, but a blood clot in the fleshy innards of his skull would change his life -- for the better. Weirdest of all, he didn't even notice he was doing it until the nurse asked him what he was drawing. Via Imagekind.comWhat you just heard was the sound of several thousand desktop wallpapers changing. The floodgates opened from there. Walters, who was an engineer before he was paralyzed, started to draw like a maniac. Via Neonga.com It took off from there. #2. #1. Via Jsarkin.com...

Russian Numbers - Russian Language Lesson 2 - Main Lesson - Russian Language Lessons New Russian Audio: To help you learn Russian this lesson now has sound. Click the green icon to listen. (Help) The next step in learning Russian is to learn the Russian numbers. Once you learn the Russian numbers you will find it much easier doing things like shopping, or catching a train or tram. Russian numbers: 1 to 10 1 - один ("a-deen") 2 - два ("dva") 3 - три ("tree") 4 - четыре ("chye-tir-ye") 5 - пять ("pyat") 6 - шесть ("shest") 7 - семь ("syem") 8 - восемь ("vo-syem") 9 - девять ("dyev-yat") 10 -десять ("dyes-yat") Read through the numbers 1-10 a couple of times until you are comfortable with them. Russian numbers: 11 to 19 Now that you are comfortable with your first Russian numbers, try to learn the numbers from 11 to 19. 11 - одиннадцать 12 - двенадцать 13 - тринадцать 14 - четырнадцать 15 - пятнадцать 16 - шестнадцать 17 - семнадцать 18 - восемнадцать 19 - девятнадцать Russian numbers: 20 and onwards As you could see, the numbers 11-19 are simply formed by adding "надцать" to the numbers 1-9.

Buddhism and the Brain Credit: Flickr user eschipul Over the last few decades many Buddhists and quite a few neuroscientists have examined Buddhism and neuroscience, with both groups reporting overlap. I’m sorry to say I have been privately dismissive. One hears this sort of thing all the time, from any religion, and I was sure in this case it would break down upon closer scrutiny. When a scientific discovery seems to support any religious teaching, you can expect members of that religion to become strict empiricists, telling themselves and the world that their belief is grounded in reality. But science isn’t supposed to care about preconceived notions. Despite my doubts, neurology and neuroscience do not appear to profoundly contradict Buddhist thought. Buddhists say pretty much the same thing. When considering a Buddhist contemplating his soul, one is immediately struck by a disconnect between religious teaching and perception. Mr. The next day Mr. Consider how easily Buddhism accepts what happened to Mr.

How Your Brain Decides Without You - Issue 19: Illusions Princeton’s Palmer Field, 1951. An autumn classic matching the unbeaten Tigers, with star tailback Dick Kazmaier—a gifted passer, runner, and punter who would capture a record number of votes to win the Heisman Trophy—against rival Dartmouth. Princeton prevailed over Big Green in the penalty-plagued game, but not without cost: Nearly a dozen players were injured, and Kazmaier himself sustained a broken nose and a concussion (yet still played a “token part”). The game not only made the sports pages, it made the Journal of Abnormal and Social Psychology. In watching and interpreting the game footage, the students were behaving similarly to children shown the famous duck-rabbit illusion, pictured above. I ought not to have felt bad. Attention can “be thought of as what you allow your eyes to look at.” But while everyone, at some point, can be made to see duck-rabbit, there is one thing that no one can see: You cannot, no matter how hard you try, see both duck and rabbit at once. References

Visible Proofs: Forensic Views of the Body: Galleries: Media: Autopsy WARNING: Some people may find images from actual postmortem dissections disturbing. Viewer discretion advised. Videos on this page require either QuickTime Player or Windows Media Player. Postmortem dissection, or autopsy, was among the first scientific methods to be used in the investigation of violent or suspicious death. Autopsy remains the core practice of forensic medicine. The postmortem examiner surveys the body's surface, opens it up with surgical instruments, removes parts for microscopic inspection and toxicological analysis, and makes a report that attempts to reconstruct the cause, manner and mechanism of death. Beginning an autopsy New York University Medical Center, The Forensic Autopsy (New York, 1978). View with QuickTime: Low Quality | High Quality View with Windows Media Player: Low Quality | High QualityRead the transcript Dissecting and analyzing the body parts

Related: