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eBooks: Welcome

eBooks: Welcome
Welcome to Buddhanet eBook!s! Here you will find our extensive collection of eBooks that were created by the Buddha Dharma Education Association Inc. for BuddhaNet.Net. The collection covers a large range of topics, from childrens books to art and history, spanning Mayahayana, Theravada and other Buddhist traditions. You will find more eBooks archived in the BuddhaNet File Library. If you are looking for the Buddhist eLibrary Project, please go here: www.buddhistelibrary.org Our eBooks are FREE. All eBooks contained here are © Copyright 'Buddha Dharma Education Association/Buddhanet.net' All rights reserved unless otherwised indicated.

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Mindfulness In Plain English A PDF preview from the 20th edition - Click Here Special Offer - 20% Off the latest edition / The 20th Anniversary Edition - eBook or paperback / See Below "Mindfulness in Plain English" has been on UrbanDharma.org a while now for free download, but the edition I posted years ago was the first edition and is now rather dated. Over the last few months I have been in contact with the publisher at Wisdom Publications about M.I.P.E... Buddhist Writings Selected By Allspirit Right Understanding Right Thinking Right Speech Right Action Right Livelihood Right Effort Right Mindfulness Right Concentration 1. Right View The Art of Living: Vipassana Meditation The following text is based upon a talk given by Mr. S.N. Goenka in Berne, Switzerland. Everyone seeks peace and harmony, because this is what we lack in our lives. From time to time we all experience agitation, irritation, dishar­mony.

Judaism 101 Where to Start There are over eighty web pages on this site, comprising over 300 pages of text, a virtual book of information on Judaism. That's a lot of information! Where should you start? Lojong Lojong (Tib. བློ་སྦྱོང་,Wylie: blo sbyong) is a mind training practice in the Tibetan Buddhist tradition based on a set of aphorisms formulated in Tibet in the 12th century by Geshe Chekhawa. The practice involves refining and purifying one's motivations and attitudes. The fifty-nine or so slogans that form the root text of the mind training practice are designed as a set of antidotes to undesired mental habits that cause suffering. They contain both methods to expand one's viewpoint towards absolute bodhicitta, such as "Find the consciousness you had before you were born" and "Treat everything you perceive as a dream", and methods for relating to the world in a more constructive way with relative bodhicitta, such as "Be grateful to everyone" and "When everything goes wrong, treat disaster as a way to wake up." History of the practice[edit]

The Five Buddha Families. The Buddha families as presented by Chogyam Trungpa Rinpoche are a description of five qualities of energy. They describe qualities we all have. They are not meant to solidify one’s ego through identifying them the way some people identify with their astrological signs. Buddha's World & Buddhism Hi Stumblers! Please see my spiritual newsletter My focus is not on rituals, symbolism or gods, but on the path that Buddhism points to and its vision on the nature of our every day "reality". Texts on the nature of the Buddhist path, texts on the nature of reality (see emptiness), karma, and texts on meditation. As the title suggests different Buddhist lineages are represented here.

Smile Into Your Organs: “A smile is an inexpensive way to improve your looks” Charles Gordy I love the idea that smiling is used as a healing and meditation practice by many ancient cultures. Taoists believe that holding a smile on your face and directing it inwards towards your organs and inner body, is the key to good health and longevity. Traditional Balinese healers know that a smile washes away bad energy and recommend smiling meditation as a simple way to calm the mind and bring health to the soul. The inspirational Thich Nhat Hanh has always encouraged us to smile as part of our daily practice for a more peaceful world, and as an essential ingredient in any walking meditation. Photo by stuck in customs:

Anger "It is natural for the immature to harm others. Getting angry with them is like resenting a fire for burning." Shantideva Once upon a time there was a little boy with a bad temper. His father gave him a bag of nails and told him that every time he lost his temper, he should hammer a nail in the fence. What Buddhists Believe - The Buddhist Concept of Heaven and Hell The wise man makes his own heaven while the foolish man creates his own hell here and hereafter. The Buddhist concept of heaven and hell is entirely different from that in other religions. Buddhists do not accept that these places are eternal.

6/15/10 Tiny Wisdom: On Starting Anew “No matter how hard the past, you can always begin again.” -Buddha One of the greatest misconceptions in life is that we are somehow powerless to let go of what’s behind us. That we have to carry regret, shame, or disappointment, and that is has to dictate how today will unfold, at least on some level. It doesn’t. At any moment, you can let go of who you’ve been and decide to be someone new—to do something differently. The Thirteen Mindfulness Trainings The Thirteen Mindfulness Trainings form the moral guidelines to develop harmony in any simple community. One of the essential elements of the Mindfulness Trainings is that they are directly applied in our daily lives. Every moment of our lives gives us the chance to put them into practice. The idea is to recite the Mindfulness Trainings regularly so that we can review our behaviour and observe where we have not lived up to our aspirations.

BEGINNER'S GUIDE ... © 1995 Dharman Craig PressonAll Rights Reserved “Zen is not what you think!” -- anonymous Preface Cave Temples In 386 the Northern Wei dynasty was declared by the Tuoba, a nomadic people from the north. As it consolidated power in north China during the fifth century, this non-Han dynasty found it beneficial to associate themselves with the burgeoning popularity of Buddhism. Despite this, the Northern Wei emperor Taiwu (r. 424-452) was persuaded by Daoist and Confucian officials at court to curb the Buddhist church. This persecution of Buddhism, begun in 446, lasted until his death in 452.

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