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Why Schools Must Move Beyond One-to-One Computing

Why Schools Must Move Beyond One-to-One Computing
Perhaps it was the driving rain and the dark grey clouds of an approaching storm that contributed to the superintendent’s choice of words. He had spent the past month reviewing one-to-one computing programs in various school districts as he tried to decide whether his own district should commit to the enormous expense of a one-to-one program at a time of declining resources. His conclusion from his visits did not leave much room for interpretation. “Horrible, horrible, horrible implementation from every program I visited,” he said. “All of them were about the stuff, with a total lack of vision.” His research convinced him not to move forward with one-to-one computing. With this absolute conclusion that one-to-one computing can lead to a waste of precious resources—including dollars and time—hanging in the air, he then asked me my thoughts on the issue. The observation of failure is not limited to this superintendent or to me. Seize the World Developing Leadership

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List of the largest libraries in the United States A complication that arises when comparing the size of library collections is the different definition of holdings or volumes used by public libraries and academic/research libraries. The Association of Research Libraries uses the National Information Standards Organization definition of volume, which is "A single physical unit of any printed, typewritten, handwritten, mimeographed, or processed work, distinguished from other units by a separate binding, encasement, portfolio, or other clear distinction, which has been cataloged, classified, and made ready for use, and which is typically the unit used to charge circulation transactions." In contrast, the Public Library Data Service Statistical Report (a publication of the Public Library Association, which is a division of the American Library Association) defines holdings as "the number of cataloged items (number of items, number of titles) plus paperbacks and videocassettes even if uncataloged.

Educational Leadership:Teaching Screenagers:One-to-One Laptop Programs Are No Silver Bullet Nearly a decade ago, when school systems began forking over millions of dollars to purchase laptop computers for every student, these programs (often called one-to-one or ubiquitous computing initiatives) were heralded as having the potential to close persistent technology gaps. Today, however, some school systems that ushered in one-to-one laptop programs amid great fanfare have begun to scrap them because of budget cuts (Lemagie, 2010); mushrooming maintenance costs (Vascellaro, 2006); and concerns about how students are using the computers (Hu, 2007). Many district leaders continue to believe that one-to-one programs are worth the expense and headaches.

Librarians Have Key Roles in Blended and Online Learning In January, I joined teacher librarians Steve Coker and Sarah Applegate from the North Thurston (WA) School District to teach a graduate library course at the University of Washington. This wholly online course made me think about the roles that librarians might play as online and blended learning expands in our schools. The points: online and blended learning Many other teacher librarians instruct at the university level in online or blended-learning scenarios. I suspect that more teach or collaborate in K–12 online courses.

The importance of BYOT Bring Your Own Technology (BYOT) is critical in the digital evolution of schools, when normalising whole school use of the digital, and when shaping digitally-based school ecosystems. Ideally, young people should be trusted in the classroom to use the digital technologies they are already using in the ‘real world’ to enhance their learning. While the young, parents and, invariably teachers have normalised the use of the digital outside the school walls and have expectations of the digital, few schools globally have normalised its use and are yet to reap the myriad opportunities and benefits.

8 digital skills we must teach our children The social and economic impact of technology is widespread and accelerating. The speed and volume of information have increased exponentially. Experts are predicting that 90% of the entire population will be connected to the internet within 10 years. With the internet of things, the digital and physical worlds will soon be merged. These changes herald exciting possibilities. How to Roll Out a 1:1 iPad Program When The Westside School decided to grow its established primary school into a leading middle school program, parents, teachers, students and administrators mapped out an integrated project-based learning environment designed to engage and challenge all participants. The planning team made a list of skills and tools that would support learning, and decided on a 1:1 iPad program to support their vision. I was brought on as technology coordinator to plan and support the curricular and technical deployment for the start of the 2011-12 school year.

Webinars 7 Ways You Can Be a Digital Citizenship Leader Recorded on Wednesday, February 17, 2016 Learn seven ways you can be a digital citizenship leader from Susan Bearden, digital citizenship experts, and author of Digital Citizenship: A Community-Based Approach (Corwin Press, 2016). Make Way for Wikis Grandview Elementary in Monsey, NY, is one lucky school. Its media specialist, Sarah Chauncey, is a tech-smart pioneer. Using free software called pbwiki.com (the “pb” stands for peanut butter), she spent two hours last month setting up password-protected wikis, or collaborative Web sites, for six classes totaling about 140 third graders. She created the wikis to give students a communal—and fun—space in which to sharpen their writing skills. “A wiki,” Chauncey writes on each class’s home page, “is a Web site that you and a group of people you permit can create and edit as easily as typing plain text. Wikis are fantastic tools for collaborative writing.

One to one computing (education) In the context of education, one-to-one computing (sometimes abbreviated as "1:1") refers to academic institutions, such as schools or colleges, issuing each enrolled student an electronic device in order to access the Internet, digital course materials and digital textbooks. The concept has been actively explored and sporadically implemented since the late 1990s.[1] One-to-one computing is frequently contrasted with a policy of "bring your own device" (BYOD), which encourages or requires students to use their own laptops, smartphones or other electronic devices in class. One-to-one computing offers the benefits of equal access, standardization, easy upgrades, simple networking and the ability to monitor student progress and online behavior. For these reasons, one-to-one computing is a major part of education policy in many countries.

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