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Growing Spirulina at Home

Growing Spirulina at Home
Process June 16, 2011, by Dr. Aaron BaumAlgaeIndustryMagazine.com he popular image of algae farming is bubbling green columns and white-coated scientists, and seems out of reach for ordinary people. Is the experience of algae farming limited to professionals? A growing network of DIY algae farmers is proving that we can all participate, by creating successful algae ponds and growth tanks in our own homes. These are not mere science projects. Helping these folks is the mission of our lab and website, Algaelab.org. Spirulina in microscope 1. Just a few grams of Spirulina powder a day have been shown to have definite health benefits. These studies are on powdered Spirulina. 2. As innocent as it may seem, Spirulina is in fact an extremophile, capable of growing in extremely alkaline water inhospitable to almost every other organism. 3. Harvesting Spirulina with a cloth filter Even when an algal culture looks nice and thick, it’s probably still about 99.9% water. Can I harvest multiple times?

http://www.algaeindustrymagazine.com/growing-spirulina-at-home/

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Health and healing Here is a simple way to first of all find out if you are astigmatic and, if so, exercises for you to alleviate the condition. All the charts mentioned may be downloaded free from By Leo Angart Astigmatism occurs when your cornea is not perfectly round and the image is focused both on the retina as well as behind the retina. You will see this as a shadow or a doubling of what you are looking at.

52 Uses for Coconut Oil - The Simple, The Strange, and The Downright Odd! - Delicious Obsessions <<Update 03/20/12 — Make sure you take some time to read through the comments on this post. When I first wrote this post back in January 2012, I thought 52 uses for coconut oil was amazing. Little did I know that my readers would leave double, and probably even triple that many new uses in the comments!>> Really? Climate crisis: seaweed, coffee and cement could save the planet This month’s meeting in Paris marks the 21st annual occasion on which nations have met to try to deal with the climate problem. After two decades of failing to agree, there is finally hope that a deal will be reached, with action to commence in 2020, and run until 2030. The world wonders whether Paris will be a success. But it is already a success, to the extent that the existing, unconditional pledges to limit greenhouse gas emissions made by nations in the lead up to the meeting are sufficient to shift humanity from the disastrous trajectory we are currently on. But the long failure of the negotiations to limit emissions gases will be felt way beyond Paris. For the last decade, greenhouse gases emissions have tracked the worst case scenario of the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change.

How To Detox From Fluoride In today’s world, fluoride is hard to avoid completely. Here’s how to detox your body. Adding fluoride to the water supplies has been called murder on a grand scale. But whether or not your town adds it to your drinking water, you’re probably ingesting this toxin every day. You’re exposed to fluoride if you take prescription drugs like Prozac, swim in pools, or sit in hot tubs. It’s in conventional produce like lettuce, and commercial bread and bakery products.

Free Plans Several free plans by Owen Geiger are now available: Preview the Economizer House Plan here.Economizer House Plan PDF Solar Pit House PDF Preview the Solar Pit House plan here. How seaweed can kelp us tackle climate change - Climate Council Seaweed, previously the unwanted guest at your beach party, is now increasingly associated with sushi, superfoods, spa treatments and – amongst scientists, at least – solutions to climate change. So just how, exactly, can seaweed help us tackle the climate crisis? Increased carbon dioxide in the atmosphere, mostly due to fossil fuel combustion, is driving rapid climate change. How to Make Magnesium Oil to Improve Sleep and Reduce Stress I’ve written before about how I use magnesium daily and why I feel it is such a vital part of overall wellness. Many people are deficient in this vital mineral that the body uses for hundreds of reactions. Every cell in the body needs magnesium in some way, and it is vital for bone, tooth, muscle, and joint health as well as for optimal sleep and stress reduction. Deficiency of magnesium is widespread because many of us have lifestyle factors that actively deplete magnesium such as lack of sleep, excess stress, or alcohol/caffeine/sugar consumption. On top of that, many natural sources of magnesium are becoming depleted (such as the soil due to over-farming and high pesticide use) and water filtration systems remove much of the naturally occurring magnesium in water. I take magnesium internally and use it on my skin daily in the form of magnesium oil.

Eco Homes from the Earth: 7 Ways to DIY Wouldn’t it be nice to own your own green dream home, made with recycled and natural materials and packed with custom features? Whether you’re an experienced builder or have never picked up a power tool in your life, you can build a natural eco-friendly home with user-friendly, low-cost materials like cob, cordwood, straw and the dirt and wood from your own land. These 7 natural building techniques produce beautiful homes with a small ecological footprint and tons of personality. Earthships and Hobbit Houses (images via dominicspics, ECOnscious, Earthship Biotecture)

Seaweed could be key ingredient for 3D printing BioPen Jan.20, 2014 Australian researchers are farming and processing seaweeds from the sea aimed at producing biomaterials such as ingredient for 3D printing BioPen. Seaweed extracts are already commonly used in goods as diverse as toothpaste, skin care products, paint, ice cream and salad dressing. However, research in the field of glycobiology – the study of complex sugars called glycans in living organisms – is showing that gel molecules taken from seaweeds are ideal candidates for medical implants and tissue engineering because they provide the necessary structural support. They also found that seaweed acts as a frontline defense and communication system in supporting or inhibiting the interaction with microorganisms such as viruses, bacteria and fungi. The BioPen works similar to 3D printing methods: It layers cell material inside a biopolymer such as alginate, a seaweed extract, protected by a second, outer layer of gel material.

Sell Your Crap, Pay Off Your Debt, And Do What You Love! This Makes It All Possible! There’s something strange happening around the globe… but it’s awesome! Lifestyles and needs are changing, and consequently, our houses are shrinking. The tiny house movement has blown up in the past few years, shifting the traditional North American housing models towards a more practical, finance-friendly blueprint. The movement is garnering attention from people fed up with the current consumerist/utility-based lifestyle which has placed millions of people in debt. Now, the idea of living your dream is no longer a cliché. The typical American home is around 2,600 square feet, while the typical small or tiny house is around 100-400 square feet.

DIY Air Conditioners – How to Make Your Own Cool Air September 7, 2010 5:00 PM The California Cooler The California Cooler is a revival of an old technology driven by an insight that's overlooked in these days of engineered indoor environments: Cool air keeps things cool. In the days before refrigerators, pantries in Northern California homes had outside vents that preserved perishables throughout cool nights. Calverts Co-operative: Design and Print Alga Carta paper On the press-room floor this week, queued for printing, we have some Shiro Alga Carta - an Italian creative paper made from seaweed. Production of this environmental paper started In the early '90s when pollution in the Adriatic sea resulted in the Venice Lagoon becoming swamped with thousands of tonnes of algae. This reduced the natural oxygen level in the water which in turn killed fish.

21 hours 21 hours A ‘normal’ working week of 21 hours could help to address a range of urgent, interlinked problems: overwork, unemployment, over-consumption, high carbon emissions, low well-being, entrenched inequalities, and the lack of time to live sustainably, to care for each other, and simply to enjoy life. February 13, 2010 // Written by: Anna Coote, Head of Social PolicyJane Franklin, Project Co-ordinator and Researcher, Social Policy This report sets out arguments for a much shorter working week.

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