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It’s Not a Fairytale: Seattle to Build Nation’s First Food Forest

It’s Not a Fairytale: Seattle to Build Nation’s First Food Forest
Forget meadows. The city’s new park will be filled with edible plants, and everything from pears to herbs will be free for the taking. Seattle’s vision of an urban food oasis is going forward. A seven-acre plot of land in the city’s Beacon Hill neighborhood will be planted with hundreds of different kinds of edibles: walnut and chestnut trees; blueberry and raspberry bushes; fruit trees, including apples and pears; exotics like pineapple, yuzu citrus, guava, persimmons, honeyberries, and lingonberries; herbs; and more. All will be available for public plucking to anyone who wanders into the city’s first food forest. “This is totally innovative, and has never been done before in a public park,” Margarett Harrison, lead landscape architect for the Beacon Food Forest project, tells TakePart. “The concept means we consider the soils, companion plants, insects, bugs—everything will be mutually beneficial to each other,” says Harrison. “Anyone and everyone,” says Harrison. Source: Take Part

http://www.whydontyoutrythis.com/2013/04/it-is-not-a-fairytale-seattle-to-build-nations-first-food-forest.html

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