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Technology In Early Childhood - Teaching with Technology in Kindergarten and Pre-school Classrooms

Technology In Early Childhood - Teaching with Technology in Kindergarten and Pre-school Classrooms

http://technologyinearlychildhood.com/

Related:  Project 1,2,3-play and learn with meCoding for KidsDigital Literacy - Blogs

Learn to Code for Teachers Part 3, or How I Spent My Summer Vacation - Technology In Early Childhood So this is the third and final installment in my Learn to Code: For Teachers series. See that stack of books in the picture above? That’s my stack of books, and I read them all this summer. I know, it’s not quite your average stack of of summer beach reads. It certainly isn’t what my summer reading stack has looked like any other summer. 15+ Ways of Teaching Every Student to Code (Even Without a Computer) According to Code.org, 90 percent of parents in the U.S. want their children to learn computer science—it will be crucial for many jobs in the near future—but only 40 percent of schools teach it. Critics claim that it is mainly the more affluent schools that offer computer science courses, thus denying those who attend poorer schools the chance to learn necessary skills. A focus on STEM is not enough: Code.org also reports that while 70 percent of new STEM jobs are in computing, only 7 percent of STEM graduates are in computer science. It is imperative that savvy schools begin to focus some STEM resources on computer science and programming.

Traditional toys like jigsaws and Lego boost children's problem solving skills Instead the experiments by psychologists from Rhodes College in Memphis, USA, suggest getting children as young as four to make things from Lego or do a jigsaw instead. Psychological scientist Jamie Jirout and team analysed data from 847 children aged 4-7 from across America who had taken a commonly used IQ test for youngsters. It then looked at the home life of the children to find those who did best were more likely to play with traditional toys at home rather than sitting in front of a screen all day. Cognitive skills form a large part of the test - matching shapes and patterns for instance - and those who played with such toys six times a week or more did best of all. However, it does not mean all traditional forms of play are better for spatial awareness, said the researchers. Perhaps surprisingly, activities with parents from reading stories to doing maths games, made little or no difference.

5 Things Every Teacher Should Be Able to Do On YouTube January, 2015 After the post I shared here on how to create flipped videos via the use of annotations and other interactivity features on YouTube, I received a couple of emails from fellow teachers asking about certain functionalities on YouTube. Instead of answering each one individually, I decided to create this post and include in it the major important things a teacher should be able to do on YouTube. Here is what you will get to learn from these tips:Know how to add subtitles and closed captions to your videosAdd and edit annotationsuse enhancement features to improve your videosHow to use YouTube video editor to combine, trim, add music and customize your clipsHow to search YouTube library for copyright-free music to add to your videosHow to swap the audio track on our videos Click on each title to access its corresponding resource page. 3- How to Add Annotations to Your Videos Annotations help you engage with viewers and make your videos more interactive.

Code Maven from Crunchzilla <h2>Code Maven gets teens excited about programming. It is an interactive tutorial where anyone can experiment with learning to code. <p> Code Maven from Crunchzilla uses Javascript. Please enable Javascript if you want to play with Code Maven. Otherwise, Code Maven will not be able to play with you. 8 classroom uses for holographic technology Eliciting engagement and creating excitement among learners is every educator’s raison d’être. One emerging technology, still in its infancy but moving quickly toward classroom application, are holograms. As you may recall from science class — or your favorite sci-fi film — holograms are 3D images formed by light beams from a laser or other coherent light source.

28 Tools to Learn Computer Programming From edshelf by edshelf: A discovery engine of websites, mobile apps, desktop programs, and electronic products for teaching and learning. Teaching primary and secondary students how to program has become a hot topic lately. Even people like United States President Barack Obama to actress Angela Bassett to music artist Shakira have spoken about the value of computer programming in an initiative called Hour of Code. With good reason too. Technology is a major part of our lives. Knowing how to build new technologies means having the ability to shape its direction.

Social Media in the Classroom: 16 Best Resources for 2015 Social media is a powerful tool for keeping in touch with friends, getting coupons and deals from your favorite businesses, and seeing what your favorite celebrities are up to. It is also handy in your classroom; platforms like Instagram, Twitter, Facebook, and others have the power to help you forge closer connections with students and parents and enhance the educational experience in your classroom. How can you make it happen? Let the following resources lead the way. Is Social Media Right for Your Classroom? Just because your fellow educators are using social media doesn’t mean you should jump blindly on the bandwagon.

Computer Coding Game No Computer Needed Superhero Activity A computer coding game is a really fun way to introduce the basic concept of computer coding to young kids. Even better if you make it a superhero computer coding game! Plus you don’t actually have to have a computer, so it’s a cool tech-free idea. This homemade coding game was pretty easy to set up and can be played with over and over again with any type of pieces. Use superheroes,LEGO, My Little Ponies, Star Wars, or whatever you have to learn a little about programming. Superhero Computer Coding Game. Meshing GBL With PBL: Can It Work? Project-based learning has essential components that make it unique to other models of instruction, such as public audience, voice and choice, driving questions, and teaching and assessing 21st-century skills. PBL requires that all of these components be present in a truly great "main-course project." Similarly, game-based learning has elements that make it unique, even in its many implementation methods. GBL can look like gamification, where game elements such as quests and incentives are used to make the unit of instruction into a game of sorts. GBL can also look like using games for instructional purposes, such as the popular Minecraft or even Angry Birds, to support student learning. Many educators may wonder how they can leverage GBL practices within a PBL project and combine them to form a powerful learning experience.

FEATURE: The Maze Coder Introducing students as young as 5 to the concepts of computer science can be challenging but also immensely rewarding. Though blockly-based platforms like Scratch and Hopscotch can prove too tricky for them, there are a wide range of apps available that introduce youngsters to sequencing, algorithms and simple computational thinking. From Daisy the Dinosaur to Lightbot and The Foos (my favourite for use with Foundation Stage students) the choice is excellent and the touch screen interface helps to streamline the process for those getting their very first taste of coding. Rather than start with an app though, I like to start with something more practical when first introducing computer science concepts in KS1. This could mean using floor robots to sequence a series of steps or perhaps something unplugged that takes a more kinaesthetic approach. There were a couple of major advantages to this approach.

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