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Lawrence Lessig: We the People, and the Republic we must reclaim

Lawrence Lessig: We the People, and the Republic we must reclaim

http://www.ted.com/talks/lawrence_lessig_we_the_people_and_the_republic_we_must_reclaim.html

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India rolls out massive surveillance system accountable neither to courts or Parliament : India Reuters | New Delhi, June 20, 2013 | UPDATED 20:37 IST India has launched a wide-ranging surveillance programme that will give its security agencies and even income tax officials the ability to tap directly into e-mails and phone calls without oversight by courts or parliament, several sources said. The expanded surveillance in the world's most populous democracy, which the government says will help safeguard national security, has alarmed privacy advocates at a time when allegations of massive U.S. digital snooping beyond American shores has set off a global furore. "If India doesn't want to look like an authoritarian regime, it needs to be transparent about who will be authorized to collect data, what data will be collected, how it will be used, and how the right to privacy will be protected," said Cynthia Wong, an Internet researcher at New York-based Human Rights Watch. Interior ministry spokesman K.S. "Security of the country is very important.

Collared or Untied: Reflections on Work in American Culture 1.Fred Armisen opened the first season of the TV show Portlandia singing “The Dream of the 90s is Alive in Portland,” a dream of pierced, tattooed folks hanging out, hot girls wearing glasses and putting images of birds on everything, and grown-ups making a living making coffee. He asks Carrie Brownstein if she remembers the ’90s, when people were unambitious and “they had no occupations whatsoever.” “I thought that died out a long time ago,” she says, wonderingly, before she leaves L.A. to join Armisen’s ragged troupe of relaxed and minimally-employed folks dedicated to the art of skateboarding. The context missing from this hilarious send-up is that Portland experienced a decade-long recession in the early years of the 2000s, and didn’t bounce back from it until the last couple of years.

About the Living Wage Calculator The Living Wage Calculator, Community Economic Toolbox, and Poverty in America websites were developed by Dr. Amy K. Glasmeier and implemented by West Arete. Eric Schultheis, a doctoral student in the Department of Urban Studies at MIT, collected, processed, and aggregated the site’s data. This online tool was developed as part of the Living Wage Project. Four Myths About Poverty - The Chronicle Review By David B. Grusky The 50th anniversary of the War on Poverty brought with it the usual spate of tie-in books, scholarly conferences, and political debate. As the dust settles on the anniversary, the country’s continuing conversation about poverty hasn’t advanced much, largely because the event became an occasion to recirculate old and deeply problematic myths. The old myths were trotted out despite some important new books that should have worked to dispel them.

The Future of Ideas The Future of Ideas: The Fate of the Commons in a Connected World (2001) is a book by Lawrence Lessig, at the time of writing a professor of law at Stanford Law School, who is well known as a critic of the extension of the copyright term in US.[1] It is a continuation of his previous book Code and Other Laws of Cyberspace, which is about how computer programs can restrict freedom of ideas in cyberspace. While copyright helps artists get rewarded for their work, Lessig warns that a copyright regime that is too strict and grants copyright for too long a period of time (e.g. the current US legal climate) can destroy innovation, as the future always builds on the past.[2] Lessig also discusses recent movements by corporate interests to promote longer and tighter protection of intellectual property in three layers: the code layer, the content layer, and the physical layer. The code layer is that which is controlled by computer programs. Editions[edit]

Undercover police officer: 'I spied on the Stephen Lawrence campaign' - video You’re viewing a beta release of the Guardian’s responsive website. We’d love to hear your feedback Opt-out and return to our current site uk news Paul Lewis, Rob Evans, Guy Grandjean, Alex Purcell and Mustafa Khalili, Source: The Guardian / Channel 4 Dispatches Share this article

THE FINANCIAL PHILOSOPHER: Foundations vs 'Castles in the Air' "I learned this, at least, by my experiment: that if one advances confidently in the direction of his dreams, and endeavors to live the life which he has imagined, he will meet with a success unexpected in common hours. He will put some things behind, will pass an invisible boundary; new, universal, and more liberal laws will begin to establish themselves around and within him; or the old laws be expanded, and interpreted in his favor in a more liberal sense, and he will live with the license of a higher order of beings. In proportion as he simplifies his life, the laws of the universe will appear less complex, and solitude will not be solitude, nor poverty poverty, nor weakness weakness. If you have built castles in the air, your work need not be lost; that is where they should be.

Swiss Activists: Let’s Cap CEO Pay Swiss voters struck down an initiative to limit CEO pay to no more than twelve times the lowest-paid worker. (Courtesy of 1:12 Initiative) Not all that many generations ago, the idea of an income floor for working Americans—a minimum wage—seemed impractically utopian.

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