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The Design Thinking School \ What we do

The Design Thinking School \ What we do
Design Thinking can be a powerful vehicle for deeper learning of content, more divergent thinking and building the thinking skills capacity of learners. Key to the process's success in learning, is that it provides the platform for learners to become problem finders. At a time when design thinking tends to come across as "shop" class and post-it notes, NoTosh have spent four years developing medium- and long-term professional development programmes with schools around the world, which marry design and education research with classroom practices that work in any part of curriculum. We've seen schools increase student engagement, content coverage and attainment thanks to the challenging way we frame design thinking and formative assessment, together, as a vehicle for creative and robust learning. What is design thinking? In schools, we use design thinking as a framework onto which we hang specific thinking skills to achieve specific learning tasks. Why design thinking?

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Resources and Tools for PBL Start to Finish Tips for downloading: PDF files can be viewed on a wide variety of platforms -- both as a browser plug-in or a stand-alone application -- with Adobe's free Acrobat Reader program. Click here to download the latest version of Adobe Reader. Documents to Help You Get Started The Hunger Games Project Documents Below are sample project-based learning documents from teachers Mary Mobley (English) and Michael Chambers (world history) of Manor New Technology High School in Manor, Texas. Want A Crash Course In Stanford’s Design Thinking? Here it is for free (Pt. 1 Empathy) The Institute of Design (D.School) at Stanford has become one of the most talked about institutions recently because of the methodology they are spreading around the world to improve our lives through a collaborative approach that inspires human centered innovations. Last week I had the absolute privilege of being a part of the Design Thinking Hawaii boot camp which was focused on improving the education system in Hawai’i. I spent an entire week submersed in this methodology but most importantly put it to practice when coaching a team of educators through a 3 day design challenge.

Building a PBL Culture in the Classroom During a project, what does a classroom look, sound, and feel like? I asked this question of three of BIE’s National Faculty members to begin a Google Hangout last week. Here’s what Feroze Munshi, Jeanine Leys, and Krystal Diaz came up with: Getting Started with Project-Based Learning (Hint: Don't Go Crazy) Before the start of the school year, many of us want to use the remaining weeks of summer to learn some new skills -- such as project-based learning (PBL). One of the things we stress for new PBL practitioners is, as I say, "don't go crazy." It's easy to go "too big" when you first start PBL.

A More Powerful Inquiry One of my core educational values is Curiosity. Yet, in the past I have fallen into the trap of Inquiry = Research instead of a more open curious discovery process. One of the biggest pedagogical changes I have made was when I shifted to an inquiry approach that was about allowing students more time to dwell, think and discuss their questions on whatever the topic of study was at that time. A lot of this had been intuitive practice so I was stoked when I first came across the Galileo Educational Network website and their intro to Inquiry (thanks Karen for the link!):

Complete Guide to Project-Based Learning Modern science continues to develop in such a way that the older generation is constantly trying to catch up with the younger generation’s adaptation to new developments and technologies. It is only logical that we should utilize our students’ familiarity with technology from a young age to maximize their engagement and learning by integrating it into our curriculum. Project-Based Learning grabs hold of this idea and fosters deep learning and autonomy by using technology to help students engage in issues and questions relevant to their lives. This resource will direct you to a variety of resources on this approach, the research behind it, and how you can use it in your class to transform your students into engaged and interested independent thinkers.

Teach21 Project Based Learning This PBL should be considered as having two different parts. First, the students must gather the information needed to complete the problem. Second, the students must compile their data to create an original script based on a set of criteria. Breaking down this long-term project seems to make it more manageable for the teacher. Like scientists, the students must gather information, analyze it, and produce a product.

NZC and Design Thinking Part 2 While last week was about deconstruction and reconstruction of the New Zealand Curriculum, this week has been about gaining clarity in our process. The state of the table over the past 2 weeks in our “Curriculum Hacking Cave” shows this quite nicely. The emergence of a Design Thinking process from the curriculum had led us to reading further into this approach. We explored other models from business and education backgrounds and came together on Monday to discuss our findings. Envision Schools Project Exchange In this project, students generated their own questions about the history of South Africa. These questions guided the activities and smaller projects leading up to the culminating exhibition, where students researched and presented their answer to their question in a powerpoint presentation. This project is interdisciplinary. As the activities in each lesson build upon each other and across disciplines, close planning between the Language Arts and World History teachers is imperative.

DTK12chat Please join us for a weekly conversation about design thinking in K12 education. We will have a variety of moderators with a wide range and depth of design thinking experiences. Each week, we will connect the dots to the design thinking methodology and how it can and will play a bigger role in today's K12 educational arena via a twitter chat. The hashtag to bookmark is #DTK12chat. The Four Phases of Design Thinking - Warren Berger by Warren Berger | 10:54 AM July 29, 2010 What can people in business learn from studying the ways successful designers solve problems and innovate? On the most basic level, they can learn to question, care, connect, and commit — four of the most important things successful designers do to achieve significant breakthroughs. Having studied more than a hundred top designers in various fields over the past couple of years (while doing research for a book), I found that there were a few shared behaviors that seemed to be almost second nature to many designers. And these ingrained habits were intrinsically linked to the designer’s ability to bring original ideas into the world as successful innovations.

What is Design Thinking, Really If you’re a businessperson or someone interested in understanding how to facilitate innovation, you’ve probably heard of “design thinking” by now. Coined by IDEO’s David Kelley, the term refers to a set of principles, from mindset to process, that can be applied to solve complex problems. I’ve seen articles lately ranging from those that highlight its potential, [Design Thinking for Social Innovation, How does design thinking give companies a competitive advantage?] to those that warn of it’s impending failure as a practice [Why Design Thinking Won't Save You , The Coming Boom and Bust of Design Thinking].

How To Do Design Thinking — What I Learned Building… David Kelley: The first step in the Design Thinking process is what we call the Understand phase: if you’re going to work in a certain area you really need to talk to experts. We’re generalists, we’re expert at process but if you really want to do something, if you’re going to design a new medical device, you have to really immerse yourself in it. So in the first step you end up studying the state of the art, going and talking to experts, doing research to bring yourself up to speed. Problem Finding and Student Ownership This term I have been co-teaching a module with Pete McGhie that has had students focusing on our developing neighbourhood, Hobsonville Point, as a place. By investigating this place we have looked to find a need facing residents and then design a product that would improve their life here. After initial lessons focusing on developing an understanding of how place, food and culture interact as concepts we went out to explore our surroundings: After this exploration we focused on generating as many problems as possible that we saw in the neighbourhood. Once we had brainstormed, shared and discussed the possible problems it was time to start defining the core problem as each group saw it.

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