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Resource – Yr7 Tropical Rainforest SoW This week I was thinking about a lot of the resources I’ve developed over the last two years in my previous role as Head of Humanities. Since I won’t be needing many of them in my new role and school thought I’d start sharing the full schemes of work I’ve put together. A choice from the Homework Menu During Key Stage 3, students covered one extreme environment each year in Geography starting with the Tropical Rainforest. The TRF was ideal for year 7 as some have had some knowledge of it already from primary school which meant they could begin to see success from the beginning of the topic but found they were challenged to develop their understanding as we went through the topic.

innovation in tropical forest conservation news Mongabay.com news articles on innovation in tropical forest conservation in blog format. Updated regularly. Next big idea in forest conservation? Playing games to understand what drives deforestation (06/26/2014) Dr. Claude Garcia plays games, but you won’t find him betting his shirt at the casino. The importance of urban forests: why money really does grow on trees The skyline along Manhattan’s Upper Fifth Avenue, where it flanks Central Park, is dominated by vast, verdant clouds of American elm trees. Their high-arched branches and luminous green canopies form – as historian Jill Jones puts it – “a beautiful cathedral of shade”. When she started researching her new book, Urban Forests, she’d have struggled to identify the species – but now, she says, “when I see one, I say ‘Oh my goodness, this is a rare survivor,’ and deeply appreciate the fact that it’s there.” The American elm was once America’s most beloved and abundant city tree. It liked urban soil, and its branches spread out a safe distance above traffic, to provide the dappled shade that cities depended on before air conditioning. Now, however, most of the big, old elms have been wiped out by Dutch elm disease.

Wildlife & habitat Humans share the Earth with a diverse range of animals and plants — and we all depend on each other for survival. Think of the salmon that carry nutrients from the ocean to the rivers and streams where they spawn. Eagles and bears that feed on the salmon carry these nutrients into the forest. The forests provide humans with numerous services and resources, from lumber for our homes to the oxygen we breathe. They are also important in our efforts to reduce global warming.

Illegal deforestation for 'sustainable' chocolate continues in Peru Tucked away in northeastern Peru, a huge cacao plantation has been taking shape over the past few years. Touted by industry as a source for “sustainable” chocolate, critics say it has displaced thousands of hectares of primary rainforest and data show that it is continuing to grow- despite government orders to cease its development. The plantation is located about 20 miles (32 kilometers) up the Amazon River from Iquitos, the largest city of Department of Loreto.

Forests worldwide threatened by drought Forests around the world are at risk of death due to widespread drought, University of Stirling researchers have found. An analysis, published in the journal Ecology Letters, suggests that forests are at risk globally from the increased frequency and severity of droughts. The study found a similar response in trees across the world, where death increases consistently with increases in drought severity. Dr Sarah Greenwood, Postdoctoral Researcher in Stirling's Faculty of Natural Sciences, said: "We can see that the death of trees caused by drought is consistent across different environments around the world.

If the palm oil industry waited for consumers to care, sustainability would get nowhere Palm oil is the most-used vegetable oil in the world, accounting for some 65% of all vegetable oil traded, and is found in everything from washing powder to breakfast cereals. Global production has doubled over the past decade and is set to double again by 2020. But oil palm trees only grow in tropical areas, and vast monocrops are rapidly destroying virgin rainforests and peatland. Ecosystem collapse, air pollution and species extinction have followed. Global action to reverse these trends has been led by the certification scheme, the Roundtable on Sustainable Palm Oil (RSPO).

This Biodegradable Paper Donut Could Let Us Reforest The Planet Environmental degradation is one of the "greatest environmental challenges of our time," according to the United Nations. Often caused by human industry and agriculture, environmental degradation is when lush land turns to desert. A total of 2 billion hectares of the earth's land is degraded, which is an area larger than all of South America.

Greenpeace rates consumer goods giants' no-deforestation progress Most consumer goods giants with commitments to eliminate deforestation from their palm oil supply chains are “moving far too slowly,” according to a new Greenpeace scorecard that rates their progress. The NGO surveyed 14 global companies and assessed them based on three criteria: responsible sourcing, transparency and industry reform. Nestle and Ferrero scored the highest, while Colgate-Palmolive, Johnson & Johnson and PepsiCo fared the worst. Danone, General Mills, Ikea, Kellogg, Mars, Mondelez, Orkla, P&G and Unilever were in the middle.

Forest-burning is a sin, says Indonesian fatwa Image copyright AFP Indonesia's highest Islamic authority has said it is a sin for people to deliberately burn forests to clear the land for growing crops. Illegal slash-and-burn farming has devastated large areas of Indonesia and causes air pollution which affects countries around the region. Indonesia has repeatedly been accused of not doing enough to stop it. We are destroying rainforests so quickly they may be gone in 100 years If you want to see the world’s climate changing, fly over a tropical country. Thirty years ago, a wide belt of rainforest circled the earth, covering much of Latin America, south-east Asia and Africa. Today, it is being rapidly replaced by great swathes of palm oil trees and rubber plantations, land cleared for cattle grazing, soya farming, expanding cities, dams and logging.

Hydropower dams worldwide cause continued species extinction New research led by the University of Stirling has found a global pattern of sustained species extinctions on islands within hydroelectric reservoirs. Scientists have discovered that reservoir islands created by large dams across the world do not maintain the same levels of animal and plant life found prior to flooding. Despite being hailed as conservation sanctuaries that protect species from hunting and deforestation, islands undergo sustained loss of species year on year after dam construction, a pattern otherwise known as 'extinction debt'. These findings represent a significant environmental impact that is currently missing from assessment procedures for proposed new dams. Isabel Jones, PhD researcher at the University and Lead Author, said: "We found a devastating reduction in species over time in the majority of reservoir islands we studied. Loss of species was investigated over a period of less than one year to over 90 years from when islands were created by reservoir filling.

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