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8 Outstanding iPad Apps to Create Tutorials and Flip your Classroom

8 Outstanding iPad Apps to Create Tutorials and Flip your Classroom
Related:  Flipped Learning

7 Must-Have Tools For The Flipped Classroom 7 Must-Have Tools For The Flipped Classroom by first appeared on gettingsmart.com The flipped classroom uses technology to allow students more time to apply knowledge and teachers more time for hands-on education. It’s a continually changing strategy that evolves with technology. Innovative educators are usually on the lookout for the latest technology breakthroughs that will help them better organize and conduct flipped classrooms. The following tools are listed from most basic to most sophisticated and can be used alone or in tandem to make flipped classrooms more engaging. Google Drive Google Drive (Docs) has many advantages over traditional word processing programs, including real-time automatic updates visible to all users, a feature that enables robust discussion and sharing. YouTube Ideal for first-time flippers, YouTube offers a user-friendly, universally understood platform for taped lectures and other educational videos. Teachem The Flipped Learning Network Camtasia Studio

Evernote as an Assessment Tool I wanted to share how I’ve been using Evernote as an Assessment Tool. I used Explain Everything on the iPad to create this video. I apologize the audio is not great, not sure how to improve this as I tried yelling, and using a headphone mic. I’ll be sharing more about how I do the self assessments although I’ve written about it here but I do love the ability to record audio and have a more “conversation like” experience with my students. Update: I forgot to mention, I email the note back to them but you could share notebooks as well but this way, they don’t have to have an evernote account. Related Posts November 28, 2006 -- PowerPoint Extreme MakeoverHere's a condensed version of a presentation that I've done on using PowerPoint effectively.

The Ultimate Guide To Flipping Your Classroom Note: This is part 1. “A reversed teaching model that delivers instruction at home through interactive, teacher-created videos and moves “homework” to the classroom. Moving lectures outside of the classroom allows teachers to spend more 1:1 time with each student. Students have the opportunity to ask questions and work through problems with the guidance of their teachers and the support of their peers – creating a collaborative learning environment.”(1) The Flipped Classroom is a learning model where students are exposed to new ideas at home–often through videos–and then work applications of that learning at school–an approach that reverses, or “flips” the old approach. Improved use of classroom time. Arguments against the Flipped Model include technology access at home, the way it can encourage the dated sequential, lecture–>practice–>quiz pattern, and the extra work of producing the videos. Your smartphone, a flip camera, etc. This is always a challenge, but the video below can help.

15 iPad Skills Every Teacher and Student should Have Check the learning goals below and share with us your feedback. Enjoy 1- My students should be able to create presentations . Sliderocket Idea Flight3- Slideshark5- SlideGrabber6- Prezi Viewer4- Xavier Presentation 2- My students should be able to create digital stories. 1-StoryKit2- Talking Tom & Ben News3- I Tell a Story4- Scholastic Storia5- Talking Tom Cat6- Toontastic7- Our Story8- Bunsella Bedtimes Story 3- My students should be able to create eBooks . 1- Book Creator for iPad2- eBook Magic3- Demibooks Composer4- Story Patch5- Creative Book Builder 4- My students should be able to print their docs right from their iPad. 1- Epson iPrint2- Print Magic3- ACT Printer4- Doc Printer5- Air Sharing 5- My students should be able to create videos . 1- Animoto Video2- Videolicious3- Vidify app4- ReelDirector5- Magisto6- Super 87- Vintagio8- iMovie 6- I want to Improve my students reading skills. 1- Hide Run Growl2- Pango Book1 and 23- Play Tales4- iHowToBook5- I Like Books6- MeeGenius

flipped classroom If you have been following my blog series on The Flipped Classroom: The Full Picture, you know that I am using this opportunity, given all the press on flipped classroom, to discuss a model of teaching and learning based on experiential education. It is a model in which authentic, often hands-on, experiences and student interests drive the learning process, and the videos, as they are being proposed in the flipped classroom discourse, support the learning rather than being central or at the core of learning. The idea of experience being core to learning has been discussed by Dale Dougherty, the publisher of Make Magazine, in the context of Maker Education: I see the power of engaging kids in science and technology through the practices of making and hands-on experiences, through tinkering and taking things apart. Those involved in the maker movement have noted the problems with the type of learning occurring in the formal educational setting: Experiential Engagement: The Activity

Gmail+1 = Student Email Addresses to Register for Online Services The Gmail+1"hack" isn't a new trick and I can't remember when I first tried it, but it still works and it still provides a solution to a problem that a lot of teachers run into when they want their students to use a new web tool. Let's say there's a new service that I want my students to use but my students don't have email addresses that they can use to register for that service. In that case I can quickly generate Gmail addresses for my students by using the Gmail+1 hack. Here's how the Gmail+1 hack works: 1. Create a new Gmail account just for your class. Disclaimers: 1. Flipped Classroom: Beyond the Videos Last week, I read an interesting blog post by Shelley Blake-Plock titled “The Problem with TED ed.” It got me thinking about the flipped classroom model and how it is being defined. As a blended learning enthusiast, I have played with the flipped classroom model, seen presentations by inspiring educators who flip their classrooms, and even have a chapter dedicated to this topic in my book. However, I am disheartened to hear so many people describe the flipped classroom as a model where teachers must record videos or podcasts for students to view at home. There are many teachers who do not want to record videos either because they don’t have the necessary skills or equipment, their classes don’t include a lot of lecture that can be captured in recordings, or they are camera shy. Too often the conversation surrounding the flipped classroom focuses on the videos- creating them, hosting them, and assessing student understanding of the content via simple questions or summary assignments. 1. 2.

7 Fun Ways to Use QR Codes In Education QR Codes Quick Response are so fun to integrate in classroom. Quick Response codes are bar codes with information. QR Codes can include contact information, websites, text, SMS, pictures and so much more. Here are some ways to Integrate QR Codes in Your Lessons 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. Quick Response Codes are so easy to create. Try it…your kids will love it! flipping part of my class There are several things I like about the FLIPPED CLASSROOM model: - First, you save a lot of time for really practising the language if students have access to the theoretical part of the explanation beforehand (at home). - Second, if a student is absent, he can always catch up. - Third, if a student needs more explanation he can watch it as many times as he feels is necessary for his comprehension. - Fourth, before tests, students can always watch the videos again to help refresh their memories. This is how I've been TRYING to flip part of my class. I'm aware there are various ways people have been flipping their classes but it's always important to think of each reality. I work at a Language Institute in Brazil and have to follow a course book for my classes. A moment which I've been finding useful to flip is the grammar explanation part of the lesson during which I would probably deal with the grammar focus. I normally create a multiple choice quiz with 10 questions.

What can you do with an iPad in the classroom? It’s a tool, it’s a tool, it’s a tool. The iPad is not going to replace teachers or ‘fix’ education. There is a cost implication that must be taken into account and only an educator will know if it is right for their students. Indeed the cost-benefit analysis for an establishment must take into account a host of factors when considering iPad use in the classroom. However, if there are iPads in the classroom, there are a number of applications that can enhance learning and assist the educator in developing student skills. Assessment for Learning The most valuable weapon in an educators arsenal is feedback. Applications such as eclicker, Socrative and Nearpod have the ability to provide instant feedback for every child in the classroom. Collaboration Setting a collaborative task is a tried and tested technique to allow students to question each other in the pursuit of an answer. Practical Use These are a few of the applications that have been made a little easier by the use of an iPad

Educreations tutorial Top 7 Guides on how to Use iPad in your Classroom iPad is definitely a gadget of huge potential in education. Many schools in the States and Canada are adopting it as a learning tool within their curriculum. Developers have already started creating e-textbooks with enhanced mobile compatibility. More important, there are now several apps that are easy to use and that enable teachers to create their own teaching content to go on iPad. Given this growing important of iPad in education, Educational Technology and Mobile Learning deemed it crucial to provide its readers with some of its best guides and posts we have published here during this year. Be it a beginner who has just started using iPad or an advanced user, these guides will definitely help you better understand and use iPad for teaching and learning purposes. 1- 12 Questions to Ask before Using iPad with your Students 2- 62 Ways to Use iPad with your Students 3- 100+ Tips on how to Integrate iPad into your Classroom 4- Excellent Slides on The Use of iPad in Education

Flip teaching Flip teaching or a flipped classroom is a form of blended learning in which students learn new content online by watching video lectures, usually at home, and what used to be homework (assigned problems) is now done in class with teachers offering more personalized guidance and interaction with students, instead of lecturing. This is also known as backwards classroom, flipped classroom, reverse teaching, and the Thayer Method."[1][2][3] Traditional vs flipped teaching[edit] The traditional pattern of teaching has been to assign students to read textbooks and work on problem sets outside school, while listening to lectures and taking tests in class. "My AP Calculus class was a really anxious environment, it was weird trying to get through way too much material with not enough time. In flip teaching, the students first study the topic by themselves, typically using video lessons prepared by the teacher[5][6] or third parties. Flipped classrooms free class time for hands-on work. Math[edit]

7 Ways to Collect Student Work in an #iPad Classroom (Updated 09/15/2012) Next week, I'll be facilitating a short one-hour workshop on a topic that is deceptively simple on a computer, but can be complex on an iPad--how to get student work off an iPad in a place where the teacher can get to it in ONE place. This short blog entry tries to offer some solutions. Let me know what you think, ok? Many apps--here's a short list--will output to WebDav, video or image format that ends up in your Camera Roll. Others will go to YouTube, cloud storage, and allow email sharing. Which solution works best? For schools deploying iPads in carts, some options are outlined below: WebDav Server - This is the best option because you can show students how to put/get their content in a central location. When considering HOW to get information off your iPad, you need to remember the following: Terms of Service for various solutions may prevent K-7 (ages 5-12) students from using online, or cloud, storage solution. This list below is no particular order of preference.

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