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Journal of Eastern Philosophy & Culture: Papers, Dictionaries, Forum, Books Reviews

Journal of Eastern Philosophy & Culture: Papers, Dictionaries, Forum, Books Reviews

http://orientalia.org/

Related:  Buddhism and Buddhist schools

Buddhism Vaults : Dalai Lama's Heart Sutra Talk, May 2001, SF Bay Area, California, Day 1 of 3. by Dave Evans Day 2Day 3 Introduction Today I was fortunate enough to sneak out of work for a few hours to hear His Holiness the Dalai Lama began a lecture on the Heart Sutra. This is a three day class and I'm going to sneak out of some work tomorrow and Attend Saturday during the day as well. Zombies First published Mon Sep 8, 2003; substantive revision Thu Mar 17, 2011 Zombies in philosophy are imaginary creatures used to illuminate problems about consciousness and its relation to the physical world. Unlike those in films or witchraft, they are exactly like us in all physical respects but without conscious experiences: by definition there is ‘nothing it is like’ to be a zombie. Yet zombies behave just like us, and some even spend a lot of time discussing consciousness. Few people think zombies actually exist.

Om Mani Padme Hum: The Meaning of the Mantra in Tibetan Buddhism Glimpsing a Few More Facets of the Mantra There are many ways to understand the meaning of the mantra. Here are a few of them: The Transformation of Speech Allegory of the Cave Plato realizes that the general run of humankind can think, and speak, etc., without (so far as they acknowledge) any awareness of his realm of Forms. The allegory of the cave is supposed to explain this. In the allegory, Plato likens people untutored in the Theory of Forms to prisoners chained in a cave, unable to turn their heads. All they can see is the wall of the cave. Behind them burns a fire. Between the fire and the prisoners there is a parapet, along which puppeteers can walk.

Buddhism and the Brain Credit: Flickr user eschipul Over the last few decades many Buddhists and quite a few neuroscientists have examined Buddhism and neuroscience, with both groups reporting overlap. I’m sorry to say I have been privately dismissive. One hears this sort of thing all the time, from any religion, and I was sure in this case it would break down upon closer scrutiny. When a scientific discovery seems to support any religious teaching, you can expect members of that religion to become strict empiricists, telling themselves and the world that their belief is grounded in reality. Buddha's World & Buddhism Hi Stumblers! Please see my spiritual newsletter My focus is not on rituals, symbolism or gods, but on the path that Buddhism points to and its vision on the nature of our every day "reality". Texts on the nature of the Buddhist path, texts on the nature of reality (see emptiness), karma, and texts on meditation. As the title suggests different Buddhist lineages are represented here. Amongst them Tibetan Buddhism and Zen.

Unsolved problems in philosophy This is a list of some of the major unsolved problems in philosophy. Clearly, unsolved philosophical problems exist in the lay sense (e.g. "What is the meaning of life?", "Where did we come from?", "What is reality?" Japanese Zen Buddhist Philosophy 1. The Meaning of the Term Zen The designation of this school of the Buddha-Way as Zen, which means sitting meditation, is derived from a transliteration of the Chinese word Chán. Because the Chinese term is in turn a transliteration of the Sanskrit term dhyāna, however, Zen owes its historical origin to early Indian Buddhism, where a deepened state of meditation, called samādhi, was singled out as one of the three components of study a Buddhist was required to master, the other two being an observation of ethical precepts (sīla) and an embodiment of nondiscriminatory wisdom (prajñā). The reason that meditation was singled out for the designation of this school is based on the fact that the historical Buddha achieved enlightenment (nirvāna) through the practice of meditation.

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