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Journal of Eastern Philosophy & Culture: Papers, Dictionaries, Forum, Books Reviews

Journal of Eastern Philosophy & Culture: Papers, Dictionaries, Forum, Books Reviews
Related:  Buddhism and Buddhist schools

Essentials of Buddhism - core concepts Om Mani Padme Hum: The Meaning of the Mantra in Tibetan Buddhism Glimpsing a Few More Facets of the Mantra There are many ways to understand the meaning of the mantra. Here are a few of them: The Transformation of Speech [An excerpt from The Dharma, by Kalu Rinpoche, from a chapter on The Four Dharmas of Gampopa. ] "The second aspect of transformation [of confusion into wisdom] concerns our speech. Mere words, which have no ultimate reality, can determine our happiness and suffering. In the Vajrayana context, we recite and meditate on mantra, which is enlightened sound, the speech of the [Bhodisattva of Compassion], the union of Sound and Emptiness. At first, the Union of Sound and Emptiness is simply an intellectual concept of what our meditation should be. One of the disciples was very diligent, though his realization was perhaps not so profound. When the two disciples went to their lama to indicate they had finished the practice, he said, 'Oh, you've both done excellently. The Powers of the Six Syllables "Behold! H.H. top of page

Allegory of the Cave Plato realizes that the general run of humankind can think, and speak, etc., without (so far as they acknowledge) any awareness of his realm of Forms. The allegory of the cave is supposed to explain this. In the allegory, Plato likens people untutored in the Theory of Forms to prisoners chained in a cave, unable to turn their heads. From Great Dialogues of Plato (Warmington and Rouse, eds.) Here are some students’ illustrations of Plato’s Cave Go back to lecture on the Phaedo Go back to lecture on the “One Over Many” Argument Go to next lecture on Criticism of Forms Need a quick review of the Theory of Forms? Return to the PHIL 320 Home Page Copyright © 2006, S.

noble eightfold path The Noble Eightfold Path describes the way to the end of suffering, as it was laid out by Siddhartha Gautama. It is a practical guideline to ethical and mental development with the goal of freeing the individual from attachments and delusions; and it finally leads to understanding the truth about all things. Together with the Four Noble Truths it constitutes the gist of Buddhism. Right view is the beginning and the end of the path, it simply means to see and to understand things as they really are and to realise the Four Noble Truth. While right view refers to the cognitive aspect of wisdom, right intention refers to the volitional aspect, i.e. the kind of mental energy that controls our actions. Right speech is the first principle of ethical conduct in the eightfold path. The second ethical principle, right action, involves the body as natural means of expression, as it refers to deeds that involve bodily actions.

Buddhism and the Brain Credit: Flickr user eschipul Over the last few decades many Buddhists and quite a few neuroscientists have examined Buddhism and neuroscience, with both groups reporting overlap. I’m sorry to say I have been privately dismissive. One hears this sort of thing all the time, from any religion, and I was sure in this case it would break down upon closer scrutiny. When a scientific discovery seems to support any religious teaching, you can expect members of that religion to become strict empiricists, telling themselves and the world that their belief is grounded in reality. They are always less happy to accept scientific data they feel contradicts their preconceived beliefs. But science isn’t supposed to care about preconceived notions. Despite my doubts, neurology and neuroscience do not appear to profoundly contradict Buddhist thought. Buddhists say pretty much the same thing. Mr. Although I despaired, I comforted myself by looking at the overlying cortex. The next day Mr.

Buddhism Vaults : Dalai Lama's Heart Sutra Talk, May 2001, SF Bay Area, California, Day 1 of 3. by Dave Evans Day 2Day 3 Introduction Today I was fortunate enough to sneak out of work for a few hours to hear His Holiness the Dalai Lama began a lecture on the Heart Sutra. This is a three day class and I'm going to sneak out of some work tomorrow and Attend Saturday during the day as well. I thought I'd share some of what he said (as interpreted through my notes) with everyone. Please forgive my spelling, my crutch... er, spell checker is not working currently. Tickets for the three day class were $150. His Holiness started this morning talking about the diversity of religions and then even the diversity of views within buddhism. I want to point out that these are just my notes of H.H.' I missed some of the afternoon session, couldn't sneak out of work for the whole thing, but I'll summarize as much detail as I have. The shoreline stage was decorated with a large backdrop picture of the palace in Lhasa, with a small decorated throne like chair in front for the fourteenth Dalai Lama to sit on.

Japanese Zen Buddhist Philosophy 1. The Meaning of the Term Zen The designation of this school of the Buddha-Way as Zen, which means sitting meditation, is derived from a transliteration of the Chinese word Chán. Because the Chinese term is in turn a transliteration of the Sanskrit term dhyāna, however, Zen owes its historical origin to early Indian Buddhism, where a deepened state of meditation, called samādhi, was singled out as one of the three components of study a Buddhist was required to master, the other two being an observation of ethical precepts (sīla) and an embodiment of nondiscriminatory wisdom (prajñā). The reason that meditation was singled out for the designation of this school is based on the fact that the historical Buddha achieved enlightenment (nirvāna) through the practice of meditation. 2. 3. When one engages in Zen meditation, Zen recommends that its practitioner follow a three-step procedure: adjusting body, breathing and mind. 3.1 The Adjustment of the Body 3.2 The Adjustment of Breathing 4. 5.

Presocratic Philosophy The Origins of Western Thought Philosophical Thinking Philosophy as a discipline isn't easy to define precisely. Issuing from a sense of wonderment about life and the world, it often involves a keen interest in major questions about ourselves, our experience, and our place in the universe as a whole. But philosophy is also reflectively concerned with the methods its practitioners employ in the effort to resolve such questions. Emerging as a central feature of Western culture, philosophy is a tradition of thinking and writing about particular issues in special ways. Thus, philosophy must be regarded both as content and as activity: It considers alternative views of what is real and the development of reasons for accepting them. Since our personal growth in these matters naturally retraces the process of cultural development, study of the history of philosophy in our culture provides an excellent introduction to the discipline as a whole. Greek Philosophy Milesian Speculation Pythagorean Life

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