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Subtle Subterranean House is Underground & Understated

Subtle Subterranean House is Underground & Understated
Many underground homes have relatively extreme designs, either due to ultra-wealthy clients who give their architects a (literal or at least metaphorical) blank check to design a luxury dream house, or because of existing conditions (for instance; retrofitting an old military base and/or missile silo to be a new home). This modest alternative shows the power of simplicity in a nonetheless remarkable minimalist home in the ground. BCHO Architects started by carving a basic box-shaped void into the earth, holding a place for the space with likewise simple retaining walls of rough and raw board-formed concrete. A side stairway starts the sequence of movement down into this space, slowly taking into increasingly more enclosed areas. Along the way, the naturalistic texture of this bounding structure is reprised in real-dirt exterior courtyard floors, rammed-earth walls outside and natural-finish wooden furniture inside. Related:  Modern UndergroundUnderground Houseshome

Underground Home Design: How to Build & Bury a House Living underground sounds disturbing – cavernous designs, claustrophobic images of cramped quarters and fuzzy pictures with low light levels come quickly to mind. A well-planned underground home, however, can be designed precisely around these problems to have all of the advantages of a cozy and private above-ground house as well as the sustainable and structural benefits of an fully-enclosed living space – entirely under the surface of the Earth. William Lishman sums up the design advantages nicely: “Why build underground? Lishman has lived in his own incredible underground home design for decades now with the pictures to prove it. His eco-friendly earth home consists of a framework of steel trusses covered in spray-on concrete and covered with tar and a layer of plastic for water protection.

Huge Cave House: Unique Modern Underground Mega-Home Somewhat notorious since being put up for sale on eBay, this cave dwelling is unique in all kinds of amazing ways – not least of which for the fact that it currently contains a curious hybrid home with a natural stone roof, modern infill walls and assorted antique furniture and furnishings. But watch out: sand falls from above, so umbrellas are mandatory for kitchen and dining spaces. Before its time as a hybrid-style home, this historic locale played host to famous 1980s rock singers (who performed on a still-extant underground stag) as well as a now-defunct 1950s roller rink. Geothermal energy provides power, heating and cooling during much of the year – making bills a fraction of a typical (much smaller) home.

Wood, Stone & Glass Home Brings the Outside Indoors Many architects talk of responding to the site and integrating their buildings with the surrounding natural environment, but few execute that intention with the compelling completeness shown in this house design. Moreover, the decisions that shaped this unique home were driven as much by sustainability and energy savings as they were by aesthetics and formal considerations. The glass roof that spans the main structure allows natural lighting deep into the Base Valley House while providing a way for breezes crossing the site to pass through and cool the structure. Bedrooms carved out of the ground below are kept out of the sun and cooled year round by the surrounding earth. Encased in wire mesh, stone retaining walls continue seamlessly from outdoors through the inside of the house, providing structural support to hold back surrounding dirt.

Sky Garden House - Architecture Linked - Architect &Architectural Social... - StumbleUpon I think one of the reasons that many are skeptical about environmental design is because they think its terribly complex and costly. It does take a bit more effort on the front end, but it's definitely not rocket science. This architecture by Guz Architects is a wonderfully developed minimalistic design with a curvilinear flare that really brings out the organic coverings. I'm most impressed with how design facilitates the needs of the plants and shrubs located throughout the house. See more at Guz Architects $50 And Up Underground House – Underground Housing & Shelter Modern + Green = Unique Underground Home Design Plan Underground homes tend to conjure mental images of hobbit holes and otherwise rounded, earthen residences. This extremely modern house by KWK Promes defies popular conventions and, despite its organic green roof, is constructed of clean lines and clear shapes. Viewed from above or around, the house blends wonderfully into the landscape – even the gentle curves and straight lines seem to work with the horizon and trees in the distance. The grass also absorbs moisture and helps regulate temperatures inside of the home. The barrier between inside and outside is highly permeable, providing continuous connections for residents with the natural world around them through giant sheets of floor-to-ceiling glass. Best of all (for the owners anyway): the lush green roof is only accessible from inside of the house through a set of secure stairs, reserving it as a private getaway for the home.

Junk House Employs Google Earth in Upcycling Local Scrap This remarkable work of recycling reverses a few common practices when it comes to the building process. First, it started with reuse rather than design: the architects of Dutch firm 2012 Architecten sought scraps before deciding what the structure should look like. Second, it does not take on ‘trash chic’ look of its materials, instead sporting a contemporary appearance built on ‘superuse’ that lowers transportation and construction costs as well as environmental impact. Steel framework from a local textile mill blends innocently into the background on the inside, while weathered wooden cladding on the exterior gives a naturally-aged appearance. Using a combination of Google Maps and local contacts, the designers and clients scoured areas within a few square miles to find scrapyards, unofficial junk piles, strange surplus trash and more – they also polled friends, family and colleagues to collect parts like broken umbrellas and busted billboards.

Portable Solar Desalination 'Plant' That May Aid In Third World Water Woes By Meera Dolasia on September 14, 2012 CCSSNAS-1NCSS-3Word Search 'Water, Water everywhere, not a drop to drink' - That, unfortunately, is the situation faced by millions of residents in developing countries who are surrounded by oceans, but have no access to fresh drinking water. Now thanks to this ingenious portable ceramic desalination 'plant' created by Milan-based designer Gabriele Diamanti, there may be a viable solution. The Eliodomestico works just like a coffee percolator except, upside down. It comprises of two ceramic pieces that sit on top of each other. The Eliodomestico is then placed in a sunny area causing the liquid in the container to heat up and turn to steam. The best part is that this portable device can desalinate up to five liters of water at a time and after the initial purchase price estimated to be about $50 USD, costs nothing extra to operate. Resources: Gizmag.com, gabriellediamanti.com

The First Zombie-Proof House Somehow, ritual drunk-conversation concerning team captains for the apocalypse has become a major part of the lives of 20-somethings. Having been matured in the Grandaddy-crowned masterpiece film (put “A.M. 180” on and forget that you have a job) 28 Days Later and the best-selling Zombie Survival Guide, we’re all a little too ready to deal with the 2012 zombie apocalypse of our dreams. “The Safe House,” designed by KWK Promes, starts to get eerily close to something I could work with, if say 200 bludgeoned members of the undead army came over to eat their way into borrowing some sugar. “The most essential item for our clients was acquiring the feeling of maximum security,” begins the designers’ website in the summary of the structure. Who wouldn’t feel safe in a concrete rectangle that folds in upon itself to become completely sealed? The house, with its movable walls, has only one entrance, which is located on the second floor after crossing a drawbridge.

6 Awesome Underground Homes Okay. So the $1.7M Cold War era underground home in Las Vegas is ghastly and depressing. But you will be amazed at how striking a buried abode can be if designed skillfully. Behold, six subterranean homes that you don’t need to be a paranoid hermit to appreciate. Berber homes, Tunisia Pictured above is Hotel Sidi Driss, a traditional sunken Berber building in the village of Matmata, Tunisia. Tunnel villa, Switzerland Designed by SeARCH and Christian Muller Architects, this tunnel-shaped home was built 72 feet (22 meters) into a slope on Switzerland’s Valsertal Valley. Cave house, Missouri This two-storey, three-bedroom home in Festus, Missouri was built inside of a 15,000-square foot sandstone cave. Malator, Wales The Malator, or Teletubby House as it’s known locally, blends into the hills that overlook St. Earth House Estate, Switzerland Earth House Estate Lättenstrasse in Dietikon, Switzerland is as close to a real-life Shire as you’ll find. Aloni, Greece

World’s largest sustainable city developed in China The world's largest sustainable city, extending about 30 square kilometers, with urban living conditions has been developed in South Asian country of China. Rising from wastelands in China, the globe's biggest eco-city of Tianjin is located 150 kilometres (93 miles) southeast from Beijing that means less than an hour on the new high-speed train line. The city, designed to be around half the size of Manhattan Island in the United States, is slated to be enriched by the hottest energy-saving technologies. Designed by Surbana Urban Planning Group, the city is planned to have an advanced light rail transit system and varied eco-landscapes ranging from a sun-powered solarscape to a greenery-clad earthscape for its estimated 350,000 residents. A sustainable city or eco-city is a preplanned city to produce their own energy, food and water in a way that does not cause detriment to the world in forms such as waste, water pollution or damage to the air.

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