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What are Interpersonal Skills?

What are Interpersonal Skills?
Interpersonal skills are the life skills we use every day to communicate and interact with other people, both individually and in groups. People who have worked on developing strong interpersonal skills are usually more successful in both their professional and personal lives. Employers often seek to hire staff with 'strong interpersonal skills' - they want people who will work well in a team and be able to communicate effectively with colleagues, customers and clients. This section of SkillsYouNeed is full of information and practical advice that you can use to improve your interpersonal skills. Interpersonal skills are not just important in the workplace, our personal and social lives can also benefit from better interpersonal skills. People with good interpersonal skills are usually perceived as optimistic, calm, confident and charismatic - qualities that are often endearing or appealing to others. Interpersonal Skills Self-Assessment A List of Interpersonal Skills Includes: Relax Clarify

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Building Rapport - Career Development From MindTools.com Establishing Bonds © iStockphotoMaica Build rapport, strengthen those bonds, and grow your network. Rapport is the ability to enter someone else's world, to make him feel that you understand him, that you have a strong common bond. – Motivational speaker Tony Robbins. Have you ever known someone who has a knack for connecting with people? No matter who this person meets, he or she manages to create a sense of trust and understanding within a matter of minutes. Interpersonal communication Interpersonal communication is exchange of information between two or more people. It is also an area of study. Related skills are learned and can be improved. During interpersonal communication there is message sending and message receiving. This can be conducted using both direct and indirect methods. Successful interpersonal communication is when the message senders and the message receivers understand the message.

Infographic: New Managers Not Getting the Training They Need to Succeed In a recent survey conducted by The Ken Blanchard Companies, more than 400 managers were asked to rate different types of training by order of importance. Here’s their top ten, ranked in order from most important to least important type of training (see infographic.) At the top, managers identified communication skills, help with transitioning to a leadership role, and interpersonal skills as the most needed training.

Building rapport with your customers We know that understanding customers is the key to giving them good service. So, how do we go about understanding them? All customer-facing functions need to get to know customers on a one-to-one basis as each person deals with them face-to-face; in that way individuals can anticipate each customer's requirements and exceed expectations. Building rapport with customers

Interpersonal relationship Field of study[edit] The study of interpersonal relationships involves several branches of the social sciences, including such disciplines as sociology, psychology, anthropology, and social work. Interpersonal skills are extremely vital when trying to develop a relationship with another person. The scientific study of relationships evolved during the 1990s and came to be referred to as 'relationship science',[1] which distinguishes itself from anecdotal evidence or pseudo-experts by basing conclusions on data and objective analysis.

How to Use Flipcharts Techniques > Public speaking > Speaking Tips > How to Use Flipcharts Preparation | Writing | Drawing | On the wall | General use | See also Using a flipchart during a presentation or training session can be a very successful tool or can go horribly wrong. Here's a set of tips and suggestions to ensure your session goes down well. Preparation Before you start your presentation, take time to prepare the flipchart setup. Customer_service_guide There’s a lot more to customer service than simply having a sign on your wall that says: ‘The customer is always right’. For any business to be truly customer-focused, everyone from front-line staff to the chief executive should strive to meet and exceed service standards. You may offer a quality, well-priced product, but if a customer receives inferior service before, during or after the sale, future sales may be lost.

Phobia The terms distress and impairment as defined by the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, Fourth Edition (DSM-IV-TR) should also take into account the context of the sufferer's environment if attempting a diagnosis. The DSM-IV-TR states that if a phobic stimulus, whether it be an object or a social situation, is absent entirely in an environment — a diagnosis cannot be made. An example of this situation would be an individual who has a fear of mice (Suriphobia) but lives in an area devoid of mice. Even though the concept of mice causes marked distress and impairment within the individual, because the individual does not encounter mice in the environment no actual distress or impairment is ever experienced. Proximity and the degree to which escape from the phobic stimulus is impossible should also be considered.

Adult Learning Theory and Principles Become familiar with Adult Learning Theory and the six principles of adult learning Adult Learning Theory Part of being an effective educator involves understanding how adults learn best (Lieb,1991). Statistical Language - Quantitative and Qualitative Data What are quantitative and qualitative data? Quantitative data are measures of values or counts and are expressed as numbers. Quantitative data are data about numeric variables (e.g. how many; how much; or how often). Qualitative data are measures of 'types' and may be represented by a name, symbol, or a number code.

Distancing effect The distancing effect, more commonly known (earlier) by John Willett's 1964 translation the alienation effect or (more recently) as the estrangement effect (German: Verfremdungseffekt), is a performing arts concept coined by playwright Bertolt Brecht. Brecht first used the term in an essay on "Alienation Effects in Chinese Acting" published in 1936, in which he described it as "playing in such a way that the audience was hindered from simply identifying itself with the characters in the play. Acceptance or rejection of their actions and utterances was meant to take place on a conscious plane, instead of, as hitherto, in the audience's subconscious"[1] Origin[edit] The proper English translation of Verfremdungseffekt is a matter of controversy.

What makes for effective PLD? At a meeting I attended last week a group of people were discussing approaches they might use to 'bring teachers up to speed' with the ideas and approaches they were discussing (in this case, computational thinking). The discussion that ensued raised all of the usual issues around why it's difficult to find effective PLD solutions: teachers are time poor, the overloaded curriculum, lack of expertise, reluctance to change etc. When turning their attention to finding a solution the predictable list appeared: provide more teacher only days (TODs), introduce a range of incentives (carrots), introduce mandatory requirements (sticks) etc. The discussion also ventured into the problem with providing PLD support that is 'just in time' rather than that which is 'just in case'. Effective professional learning and development has the following four characteristics:It is in-depthIt is provided over timeIt is related to practiceIt is contextually relevant

Knowing your products and services Product knowledge is an essential sales skill. Understanding your products' features allows you to present their benefits accurately and persuasively. Customers respond to enthusiastic sales staff who are passionate about their products and eager to share the benefits with them. Get to know your products or services Marx's theory of alienation The 19th-century German intellectual K.H. Marx (1818–83) identified and described four types of Entfremdung (social alienation) that afflict the worker under capitalism. Entfremdung (estrangement) is Karl Marx’s theory of alienation, that designates the types of human relations which are not controlled by their participants and the ensuing results thereof. Such relations present themselves as the separation of things that naturally belong together; and the placement of antagonism between things that are properly in harmony. Theoretically, Entfremdung describes the social alienation (estrangement) of people from aspects of their human nature (Gattungswesen, “species-essence”) as a consequence of living in a society stratified into social classes; Marx had earlier expressed the Entfremdung theory in the Economic and Philosophic Manuscripts of 1844 (1927).

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