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The Ten Myths of Innovation: the best summary

The Ten Myths of Innovation: the best summary
I wrote the bestselling book The Myths of Innovation to share the truths everyone should know about how big ideas really change the world. Far too much of what we know about creativity isn’t based on facts at all, and my mission is to change this. Since its publication I’ve seen bloggers summarize the book into simple lists (or cheezy videos), but here’s a version written by my own hand. You can also see my compilation of 177 innovation myths others have written about. The book was heavily researched with 100s of footnotes and references, but here’s the tightest summation: The myth of epiphany. If you liked this summary, please get the book.

http://scottberkun.com/2013/ten-myths-of-innnovation/

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Debunking the Myth of Innovation Nearly everywhere you turn these days, you are exhorted to innovate, disrupt, or otherwise prove yourself a game changer. It's enough to make you feel that if you haven't put a couple of Fortune 500 incumbents out of business this week, you've taken your eye off the ball. There's nothing wrong--and plenty that is right--with trying to innovate. But what if innovation is not the panacea it's said to be? Can't you simply work hard, heed your customers, and manage your business very, very well? Looking For Customers? Be A Hunter, Not A Gatherer ⚙ Co You've come up with a great business idea, teamed up with trusted cofounders, registered your URL, thrown up your minimum viable product in WordPress, and emailed your link to a few VC friends to "gauge their thoughts." Now sit back, refresh your analytics dashboard, and wait for customers to sign up. Right? Wrong. If only it were that easy.

The Myth of Epiphany One of the most provocative chapters of The Myths of Innovation (book summary) is The Myth of Epiphany. This myth is the belief that there is something magical about how ideas come to us, and that breakthrough ideas frequently come to people as a result of a flash of insight. I’ve spent years studying the many well known stories of flashes of insight in history and found most of the them were legends or exaggerations. One of my favorite accountings was Tim Berners-Lee describing how he invented the World Wide Web, one of the greatest inventions of the 20th century: “Journalists have always asked me what the crucial idea was or what the singular event was that allowed the web to exist one day when it hadn’t before. They are frustrated when I tell them there was no Eurkea moment.

Ten Innovation Myths - Scott Anthony by Scott Anthony | 9:42 AM October 28, 2011 Over the past year I’ve shifted my presentation materials so they include mostly pictures and 96 point font. That’s good for audiences (at least, I think it is), but bad when I get the kind of request that landed in my in-box last week. “I’m doing an innovation update at one of our meetings and I’m hoping you can assist me with some conversation starters,” a senior leader said to one of our clients. “The main point of the presentation is to get the audience thinking proactively and positively about how they can contribute to innovation.”

Up!, Second Skin and #hack4good Posted by on 27 August 2013 | Comments Up! Shoutout for a friend: lovely chap (and available-for-business photographer!) Matt Evans is just finishing up his 100day project, which focuses on clouds (predominantly in the Wellington region).

Why Small Ideas Can Matter More Than Big Ideas Americans are preoccupied by the size of things: big houses, big sandwiches, and big salaries. At leadership retreats, and in the bestselling books we buy, we seek grand thoughts. The basic logic we use is the bigger the idea, the bigger the value, but often that’s not true. There’s a myth at work here: the assumption that big results only come from radical changes. Innovative Thinking System Innovation is the creative, driving force that keeps companies thriving. William Pollard once said, “Learning and innovation go hand in hand. The arrogance of success is to think that what you did yesterday will be sufficient for tomorrow.” Whether it be in technology, finance, or manufacturing, companies that continue to learn, create, design, and innovate will be successful.

The Twelve Gifts of Christmas, Startup Weekend Edition The silly season is in full swing and the Christmas spirit has us rolling around in pine needles with everyone’s favourite jolly old man – Santa Claus! We sat down with the old chap to have a chat about this year’s wish lists. Assuming they’ve all been good this year, we understand it can be a right pain to shop for a particular (and likely stubborn) breed of professionals, so here’s our list of the top 12 terribly thoughtful and seriously kickass offerings for the Startup Weekender(s) in your life.

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