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The Four Elements of Physical Energy and How To Master Them

The Four Elements of Physical Energy and How To Master Them
I have a FitBit (glorified pedometer if I ever saw one), and since getting it, my exercise goal each day is to hit 5,000 steps. On work days, I generally hit 2,000-3,000 each day consistently, meaning I only need to take a walk around the block twice when I get home to meet my goal. Recently, due to winter, I mostly was just pacing back and forth in my apartment while watching Netflix. A process that could take me up to two hours to get those extra 5,000 steps in (it's a small apartment). Now that it's warming up outside, I can get outside and get those steps within half an hour or so, depending on how fast I walk. Now that it's starting to warm up, I've also taken to parking my car further away at the office, which also helps to get the steps in. I combine this method with Jerry Scienfeld's method of "Don't Break the Chain," which REALLY helps come Sunday when I'm not doing anything or going anywhere, and therefore really do need to concentrate to get my 5k steps in.

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