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Slow Movement

Slow Movement
The Slow Movement advocates a cultural shift toward slowing down life's pace. It began with Carlo Petrini's protest against the opening of a McDonald's restaurant in Piazza di Spagna, Rome in 1986 that sparked the creation of the Slow Food organization. Over time, this developed into a subculture in other areas, such as Cittaslow (Slow Cities), Slow living, Slow Travel, and Slow Design. Geir Berthelsen and his creation of The World Institute of Slowness[1] presented a vision in 1999 for an entire "Slow Planet" and a need to teach the world the way of Slow. Carl Honoré's 2004 book, In Praise of Slowness, first explored how the Slow philosophy might be applied in every field of human endeavour and coined the phrase "Slow Movement". "It is a cultural revolution against the notion that faster is always better. Professor Guttorm Fløistad summarizes the philosophy, stating: "The only thing for certain is that everything changes. Cittaslow[edit] Slow ageing[edit] Main article: Slow ageing General: Related:  Wisdom

Participatory design Participatory design (originally Cooperative Design, also known in the USA as co-design) is an approach to design attempting to actively involve all stakeholders (e.g. employees, partners, customers, citizens, end users) in the design process to help ensure the result meets their needs and is usable. The term is used in a variety of fields e.g. software design, urban design, architecture, landscape architecture, product design, sustainability, graphic design, planning, and even medicine as a way of creating environments that are more responsive and appropriate to their inhabitants' and users' cultural, emotional, spiritual and practical needs. It is one approach to placemaking. It has been used in many settings and at various scales. Participatory design is an approach which is focused on processes and procedures of design and is not a design style. Definition[edit] History[edit] History in Scandinavia[edit] Fields of participatory design[edit] Community planning and placemaking[edit]

Postcards connecting the world User-centered design The chief difference from other product design philosophies is that user-centered design tries to optimize the product around how users can, want, or need to use the product, rather than forcing the users to change their behavior to accommodate the product. UCD models and approaches[edit] For example, the user-centered design process can help software designers to fulfill the goal of a product engineered for their users. User requirements are considered right from the beginning and included into the whole product cycle. Cooperative design: involving designers and users on an equal footing. All these approaches follow the ISO standard Human-centred design for interactive systems (ISO 9241-210, 2010). The ISO standard describes 6 key principles that will ensure a design is user centered: Purpose[edit] UCD answers questions about users and their tasks and goals, then uses the findings to make decisions about development and design. Who are the users of the document? Elements[edit] Language[edit]

Slow design Slow Design is a branch of the Slow Movement, which began with the concept of Slow Food, a term coined in contrast to fast food. As with every branch of the Slow Movement, the overarching goal of Slow Design is to promote well being for individuals, society, and the natural environment. Slow Design seeks a holistic approach to designing that takes into consideration a wide range of material and social factors as well as the short and long term impacts of the design. Origin and meaning[edit] Slow Design refers to the goals and approach of the designer, rather than the object of the design. While Fuad-Luke focused on the design of physical products, the concept can be applied to the design of non-material things such as experiences, processes, services, and organizations. Beth Meredith and Eric Storm attempt to summarize the concept, stating: Current and future practice[edit] Common qualities of Slow Design include: See also[edit] References[edit] External links[edit]

The Octarine argument. Yes, yes - colour corresponds with real properties. But colour itself is not in the external physical world. It's like those cases where a picture from a telescope or a microscope is given colours artificially to help show up the different substances. The colours are not real, but they do help you understand more about what you're seeing. After all, we only actually sense three different wavelengths. If you think about it, though, this means that the way we see things is actually wrong. All the same, it is possible to do a bit better, and some animals detect more than three different wavelengths. ParadigmOfComplexity The last few decades have seen the emergence of a growing body of literature devoted to a critique of the so-called “old” or “Cartesian-Newtonian” paradigm which, in the wake of the prodigious successes of modern natural science, came to dominate the full range of authoritative intellectual discourse and its associated worldviews. Often coupled with a materialistic, and indeed atomistic, metaphysics, this paradigm has been guided by the methodological principle of reductionism. The critics of reductionism have tended to promote various forms of holism, a term which, perhaps more than any other, has served as the rallying cry for those who see themselves as creators of a “new paradigm.” At the forefront of such a challenge, and in many ways the herald of the new paradigm, is the relatively new movement of transpersonal psychology. In taking seriously such experiences, transpersonal theory has been compelled to transcend the disciplinary boundaries of mainstream psychology. C.

9 Mind-Bending Epiphanies That Turned My World Upside-Down Over the years I’ve learned dozens of little tricks and insights for making life more fulfilling. They’ve added up to a significant improvement in the ease and quality of my day-to-day life. But the major breakthroughs have come from a handful of insights that completely rocked my world and redefined reality forever. The world now seems to be a completely different one than the one I lived in about ten years ago, when I started looking into the mechanics of quality of life. Maybe you’ve had some of the same insights. 1. The first time I heard somebody say that — in the opening chapter of The Power of Now — I didn’t like the sound of it one bit. I see quite clearly now that life is nothing but passing experiences, and my thoughts are just one more category of things I experience. If you can observe your thoughts just like you can observe other objects, who’s doing the observing? 2. Of course! 3. 4. 5. Yikes. 6. This discovery was a complete 180 from my old understanding of emotions. 7.

Toward a Complex Adaptive Intelligence Community [ Top of page ] What was that? How can we change ourselves in ways we cannot predict? More directly, how do we modify our nature to enable such unpredictable changes? Figure 1 - Complex Adaptive Behavior The only way to meet the continuously unpredictable challenges ahead of us is to match them with continuously unpredictable changes of our own. To describe a community that “dynamically reinvents itself by continuously learning and adapting” in response to environmental changes harks to theoretical developments in the philosophy of science that matured in the 1990s collectively known as Complexity Theory. . . . . . . The objective that was identified at the outset of this article was that the Intelligence Community must be able to dynamically reinvent itself by continuously learning and adapting as the national security environment changes. It is this expertise that engenders the trust required for independent action. The rules themselves are also subject to the wiki process.

7 Lessons From 7 Great Minds Have you ever wished you could go back in time and have a conversation with one of the greatest minds in history? Well, you can’t sorry, they’re dead. Unless of course you’re clairaudient, be my guest. Even though these great teachers have passed on, their words still live, and in them their wisdom. 1. “If you don’t know where you are going, you’ll end up someplace else.” - Lawrence J. In order for us to achieve our dreams, we must have a vision of our goals. Action: Visualize a life of your wildest dreams. 2. “It was a high counsel that I once heard given to a young person, “Always do what you are afraid to do.” - Ralph Waldo Emerson The best way to learn something is to dive right in to it. Action: You must define your fears in order to conquer them. 3. “All that we are is the result of what we have thought. Our thoughts determine our reality. Action: Create a list of your intentions and desires. 4. Action: Realize that happiness is a choice. 5. 6. 7. Courtesy of IlluminatedMind.net

Q Methodology: A Method for Modern Research

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