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Teaching Coding: Where Do You Start?

Teaching Coding: Where Do You Start?
EdSurge Newsletters Receive weekly emails on edtech products, companies, and events that matter. Soon after I wrote my last article on Edsurge “Where Does Tech-ed Belong in Edtech?,” advocating for the need for computer science education, there was a surprising amount of activity in this area--from President Obama’s interview to the much talked about Code.org video. The timing of my article was purely coincidence, though I wish I could say otherwise! Now that we are warming up to the idea that we must teach computer science or programming or “coding” in our schools, the next question is “Where do you start?” The advocacy channels and computer science organizations (CSTA, NCWIT, CSEdWeek, Code.org) give a number of helpful links to curriculum guides, tools, online programming courses and much more. I decided to look for a starting point based on what I have seen work again and again in my programming classes. While searching for this answer, I realized that it was actually obvious.

https://www.edsurge.com/n/2013-03-13-teaching-coding-where-do-you-start

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It's time for every student to learn to code By Alice Steinglass May 14th, 2015 Learning to code is about more than career readiness. It’s about helping students make sense of their digital world Recently, there has been a lot of discussion around the importance of coding in the K-12 classroom. Should it be compulsory for all students? An elective? ScratchJr: Coding for kindergarten Can children learn to code at the same age they’re learning to tie their shoes? That’s the idea behind ScratchJr, a free iPad app released this week by researchers at the MIT Media Lab, Tufts University, and Playful Invention Company (PICO). With ScratchJr (scratchjr.org), children ages five to seven can program their own interactive stories and games. In the process, they learn how to create and express themselves with the computer, not just interact with it.

Learn To Code, Code To Learn Is it important for all children to learn how to write? After all, very few children grow up to become journalists, novelists, or professional writers. So why should everyone learn to write? 7 Apps for Teaching Children Coding Skills It's hard to imagine a single career that doesn't have a need for someone who can code. Everything that "just works" has some type of code that makes it run. Coding (a.k.a. programming) is all around us. That's why all the cool kids are coding . . . or should be. Programming is not just the province of pale twenty-somethings in skinny jeans, hunched over three monitors, swigging Red Bull.

Code Monster from Crunchzilla <h2>Code Monster gets kids excited about programming. It is a combination of a game and tutorial where kids experiment with learning to code. <p> Code Monster use Javascript. Please enable Javascript if you want the play with the Code Monster. Otherwise, Code Monster will not be able to play with you. </p><p></h2> Creative Computing 7 units44 activitiesremixing encouraged download the guide> help learnerscreate new worldswith computing download the guide an introductorycomputing curriculumusing Scratch What is Creative Computing?

Teach Your Kids to Code: 6 Beginner's Resources for Parents Introducing computer programming to your kids can be a challenge, especially for those who aren’t familiar with the nuances of code. Fortunately, in the last few years, a number of apps, software, and guides have been produced that make the often-complex subject of computer coding easy to grasp for young learners. So where to begin? These are a few resources that parents can share with their kids to help them start learning about programming.

New App Teaches Coding With Robots Smart Classroom Technologies New App Teaches Coding With Robots By Dian Schaffhauser08/03/15 How can teachers push students to learn programming in the classroom through such endeavors as December's upcoming Hour of Code if they don’t know how to code themselves? This question led to the creation of a new app that teaches students the basics of coding without much input from the teacher. MIT App Inventor Get Started Follow these simple steps to build your first app. Tutorials Step-by-step guides show you how to build all kinds of apps.

Game Design 2015 Hi! We are from Tower Hill and we are the Digital Game Design (CodeMasters) class of 2014-2015! This year we worked on projects involving different code languages, primarily Javascript and HTML (which this website is using). Some projects include the making of Java based Tic-Tac toe game to a fully functioning clicker game. Please check out our webpage and our projects (please see warning and liability below) 'Coding Nation' Chronicles 300 Ways to Pick Up Programming EdSurge Newsletters Receive weekly emails on edtech products, companies, and events that matter. How many ways can you learn to code? Try more than 100101100--or, in translation, more than 300. That's according to a report, "Coding Nation," fresh from the digital press at the Kapor Center for Social Impact. The accompanying spreadsheet lists 316 online and in-person programs categorized by: Bootcamps, Certification programs, Corporate-focused programs and Hackathons.

15+ Ways of Teaching Every Student to Code (Even Without a Computer) According to Code.org, 90 percent of U.S. schools are not teaching any computer science. Eyebrows were raised in 2013 as the U.K. passed a plan to educate every child how to code. In 2014, Barack Obama made history as the first U.S. president to program a computer. Yet critics claim that often only the more affluent schools offer computer science courses, thus denying minorities potential to learn the skills required by the 1.4 million new jobs that will be created during the next ten years. Give Your Kids a Most Excellent Summer Coding Adventure For a new generation of students growing up in a digitally-connected century, all roads lead to code. Coding is the new literacy. It will not replace foreign languages, but it will be the global vernacular for understanding how technologies work. Unlike the Trix cereal, coding and computer science aren't just for kids. Everyone, and especially teachers and parents, can lead by example and learn a few lines of HTML. Here's how Idit Harel, CEO of Globaloria, explains why parents need to code:

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