background preloader

30 Universal Strategies For Learning

30 Universal Strategies For Learning
30 Universal Strategies For Learning by Terry Heick As teachers, we’re all trying to better understand how people learn–not now they’re taught in terms of teaching strategies, but more so learning strategies–only not really strategies. Learning actions, or cognitive actions. Strategies for learning. Self-directed and social learning will undoubtedly be at the core of any sort of future learning–both near and far future. Bloom’s taxonomy–especially the annotated “Bloom’s Wheel”–helpfully offers power verbs that drive the planning of learning activities, but I wanted to be even more specific. In the TeachThought Learning Taxonomy, we approached this idea, and did so again with How To Add Rigor To Anything. Using “Universal Strategies” So how can this help you as an educator? The big idea is that these kinds of “brain actions” are not only the kinds of tasks you can use to create assignments, but more importantly are the kinds of acts that promote inquiry-based understanding. An example?

http://www.teachthought.com/learning/project-based-learning/27-actions-that-promote-self-directed-learning/

Related:  good ideasCritical thinkingStudy Skills

How They Get It: A New, Simple Taxonomy For Understanding How They Get It: A New, Simple Taxonomy For Understanding by Terry Heick How can you tell if a student really understands something? They learn early on to fake understanding exceptionally well, and even the best assessment leaves something on the table. (In truth, a big portion of the time students simply don’t know what they don’t know.)

RHE's home page draft Robert H. Ennis' Academic Web Site This site was last edited September 6, 2011. Smart Homework: Can We Get Real? Here’s the first of a several-part series on smart homework practices, adapted from Rick Wormeli’s seminal book about teaching in the middle grades, Day One & Beyond: Practical Matters for New Middle Level Teachers. What’s most remarkable about Wormeli’s discussion? How relevant and comtemporary it feels, a decade after he wrote it! The homework controversy continues, and Rick continues to offer great advice on this topic in workshops and presentations across North America.

21 Grab-And-Go Teaching Tools For Your Classroom 21 Grab-And-Go Teaching Tools For Your Classroom by Lynn Usrey Every teacher wants to be able to make his or her classroom environment the optimum place for learning, interacting and engaging. Today, there is a wide assortment of free technology options available to enhance your instruction. The tools are changing… quickly. So making the best choices, based on the resources available in your school, or through your board, is critical. 5 Practical Learning Tips Based On How People Do 5 Practical Learning Tips Based On How People Do–And Don’t–Learn by Charlie Chung, Class Central There has been a large body of work in neuroscience, psychology, and related fields offering more and more insight into how we learn. Below are five of the top tips from Barbara Oakley, Professor of Engineering at Oakland University, who has faced her own learning challenges (failing middle and high school math and science classes), and has made a study of the latest research on learning. She is also offering a free online course, Learning How to Learn, which starts August 1 on the Coursera platform with co-instructor, Prof. Terrence Sejnowski, a computational neuroscientist at UC San Diego and the Salk Institute.

20 Questions To Guide Inquiry-Based Learning 20 Questions To Guide Inquiry-Based Learning Recently we took at look at the phases of inquiry-based learning through a framework, and even apps that were conducive to inquiry-based learning on the iPad. During our research for the phases framework, we stumbled across the following breakdown of the inquiry process for learning on 21stcenturyhsie.weebly.com (who offer the references that appear below the graphic). Most helpfully, it offers 20 questions that can guide student research at any stage, including:

9-powerful-habits-for-getting-important-things-done-and-building-your-willpower- We all know that sinking feeling. A deadline is drawing closer and you haven't even started yet. You begin to panic and a dull nausea sets in. There is nothing worse than having two hours remaining to complete a project that you know will take more like five. Why Homework Matters As an elementary/middle school teacher, I hear constant complaints about the issue of homework. There are valid points against overdoing it and even studies that suggest, in some cases, it doesn’t always help. There’s a big difference between busy work and assignments that are meaningful. Some researchers, like Sara Bennett and Nancy Kalish, propose that homework is a hidden cause of childhood obesity. Others, like Alfie Kohn, believe that the quality and quantity of assignments done at home should be addressed, pronto. So, why do students today still have to do this archaic activity?

10 Team-Building Games That Promote Collaborative Critical Thinking One of education’s primary goals is to groom the next generation of little humans to succeed in the “real world.” Yes, there are mounds of curricula they must master in a wide breadth of subjects, but education does not begin and end with a textbook or test. Other skills must be honed, too, not the least of which is how to get along with their peers and work well with others. This is not something that can be cultivated through rote memorization or with strategically placed posters. Students must be engaged and cooperation must be practiced, and often. The following team-building games can promote cooperation and communication, help establish a positive classroom environment and — most importantly — provide a fun, much-needed reprieve from routine.

edutopia With so many classroom research studies published daily, you can be forgiven for missing some. The techniques below are super-tactical and, for the most part, unsung strategies that you’ll be excited to try tomorrow. Just remember two things. First, there are always limitations and nuances in research, so we suggest you click the links and dig deeper into the studies. Second, studies are just words without you—your application and adaptations give them power. What Tests Actually Measure What Tests Actually Measure by Grant Wiggins, Authentic Education We interrupt this general look at test validity to comment on very important educational research that was just made public (though the news of the findings was made known a few months ago on the APA website). In an exhaustive study that used MCAS test scores from Massachusetts and various tests of cognition (related to working memory, processing speed and fluent reasoning) researchers from Harvard, Brown & MIT examined the relationship between achievement in school as measured on standardized tests and student cognition. We already knew that these cognitive skills are fundamental in advancing or inhibiting intellectual achievement generally and school achievement specifically:

7 Habits Of Highly-Effective Teachers Who Effectively Use Technology 7 Characteristics Of Teachers Who Effectively Use Technology by TeachThought Staff Ed note: This post has been updated with an updated visual from Sylvia Duckworth, who took our graphic from alwaysprepped.com (now getalma) post and created the above visual. It is also sporting a new title, as the “habits of” is a trademarked term. Ultimate Guide to Becoming a Better Student Good study tips and habits can make a tremendous difference in understanding academic subject matter, and improving test scores. Some students inherently understand these concepts, while others take a bit more time to adapt to these practices. Many successful students create their own personal methods to absorbing classroom material by tweaking already established methods of learning. Regardless of the different types of students there may be, understanding how to absorb and articulate subject matter is a necessity for all people involved in the learning process; in and outside of the classroom. Participating in Class Student Participation: Learning About Active Learning: This article outlines the importance of participating in class in order to absorb and learn the information being presented.

6 Channels Of 21st Century Learning 6 Channels Of 21st Century Learning This post has been updated from a 2013 post by Terry Heick At TeachThought, we constantly wrestle with two big questions: How do people learn, and how can they do it better in a constantly evolving context? In pursuit, the theme of “21st century learning” often surfaces, a popular label that, while perhaps cliche, still seems to be necessary as we iterate learning models, fold in digital media resources, and incorporate constantly changing technology to an already chaotic event (i.e., learning). This has produced our 9 Characteristics of 21st Century Learning, a kind of overview we created in 2009, and our Inside-Out School model that is meant to be a kind of bridge between current school design and what’s possible moving forward. Learning Channels

Related: