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What Would Steve Do? 10 Lessons from the World’s Most Captivating Presenters

What Would Steve Do? 10 Lessons from the World’s Most Captivating Presenters

7 Lessons From the World's Most Captivating Presenters [SlideShare] It’s 7:54 on a frigid January morning in San Francisco. You’re waiting outside the Moscone Center, in a queue of several thousand people, many of whom have been camping out in the cold for over 12 hours. The security detail for this event rivals the Democratic National Convention. Another hour passes before you’re comfortably seated in a giant auditorium that’s crackling with anticipation. Finally, at 9:43 a.m., the moment you’ve been waiting for arrives. "This is a day I've been looking forward to for two and a half years. (Download 20 of the best presentation examples to inspire your next presentation.) Such was the scene on January 9, 2007, when Steve Jobs unveiled the iPhone in one of the most captivating product launches in history. As Carmine Gallo puts it in his book, The Presentation Secrets of Steve Jobs, Steve “transformed the typical, dull, technical, plodding slideshow into a theatrical event complete with heroes, villains, a supporting cast, and stunning backdrops.

5 priorities that should dominate corporate directors’ to-do lists Key challenges threatening companies’ reputations are expected to crowd agendas of corporate boards, including their audit committees, this year, according to research by the EY Center for Board Matters and Deloitte. “With the rapid rise of transformational technologies, digital risks, and human capital challenges, boards need to effectively manage reputational risk on a global scale,” Ruby Sharma, a principal with EY and the EY Center for Board Matters, said in a statement. “As a result, board members’ time commitment might increase in 2015,” Sharma said. Reputational risk is driven by a host of business risks. Eighty-seven per cent of about 300 executives polled worldwide by Deloitte in 2013 said reputation risk is a key challenge because it can quickly escalate into a major strategic crisis if not properly managed. Board composition and turnover. Pressure from shareholders could come through proposals or letters to the board and through proxy voting decisions. Improving disclosures.

Duarte Blog Just a couple more stops until the Death Star. @sean_voegeli Many of our employees live a long way from the office. Sean Voegeli* is a talented illustrator, avid Instagrammer, and loyal Star Wars fan. First, where can we find your work? What tools do you use? I like Adobe Draw a lot. How has your #creativecommute affected your day? On the way home, it’s a good way to unwind and transition into dad-mode. How do you decide what to draw? Which comes first, illustration or photo? How long does each piece take to make? Why Instagram? Do you have a favorite piece? “All strollers and droids must enter through the gate please.” And this one. Don’t you dare order a hotdog at this Disneyland stand. Last question, who should we be following on Instagram? Even if you can’t draw, you can spend your commute being creative and productive. So we dare you. *Voegeli is pronounced “vaguely” in case you were wondering.

AMA Playbook How Competition Hurts Your Company The Crimes We Commit in the Name of Team Building… How Competition Hurts Your Company Competition is the way to keep your edge and maintain your position in your industry. It’s the lifeblood of business, right? Not so much! Certainly not when you direct your competition internally—between departments and teams. A University of Minnesota study recognized this way back in the 1990s. There are a couple of reasons why internal competition hurts your company. First, a lot of competitive exercises disguised as team building create meaningless competitions that pit departments and individuals against each other. Second, having different parts of your company compete with one another is a bit like having your hands try to compete with your feet. If you want to achieve greatness in your company, then develop healthy bonds between your internal teams, the employees, and the boss—and even with the top leaders and the organization itself. The way to do this is by creating a common purpose. Purpose.

How to Present to Senior Executives - Nancy Duarte by Nancy Duarte | 11:00 AM October 4, 2012 Senior executives are one of the toughest crowds you’ll face as a presenter. They’re incredibly impatient because their schedules are jam-packed — and they have to make lots of high-stakes decisions, often with little time to weigh options. So they won’t sit still for a long presentation with a big reveal at the end. It can be frustrating. Here’s how you can earn their attention and support: Summarize up front: Say you’re given 30 minutes to present. Set expectations: Let the audience know you’ll spend the first few minutes presenting your summary and the rest of the time on discussion. Create summary slides: When making your slide deck, place a short overview of key points at the front; the rest of your slides should serve as an appendix. Give them what they asked for: If you were invited to give an update about the flooding of your company’s manufacturing plant in Indonesia, do so before covering anything else. Sounds like a lot of work?

10 Things I Learned From Failure : Lifestyle Every entrepreneur has made a series of mistakes or been subject to failures along his or her entrepreneurial journey. These setbacks, t May 04, 2011 Every entrepreneur has made a series of mistakes or been subject to failures along his or her entrepreneurial journey. These setbacks, though painful, will teach you more about business than any textbook, lecture, or mentor ever could. Plus, they are great fodder for conversations at cocktail receptions and on panel discussions. I am proud to have learned such a great deal from my failures, and the fact that I get to share them—and, more important, the hard-knocks lessons learned—with a worldwide audience is a real thrill. And with that, here are my top 10 lessons learned from my past failures that were well worth the price of admission (well, after I survived them, that is). 10. Build a sustainable business for yourself, and not one based on hypothetical acquisitions or imaginary investment capital. 9. If you are human, guess what? 8. 7.

Five Presentation Mistakes Everyone Makes - Nancy Duarte by Nancy Duarte | 2:00 PM December 12, 2012 We all know what it’s like to sit through a bad presentation. We can easily spot the flaws — too long, too boring, indecipherable, what have you — when we watch others speak. The thing is, when we take the stage ourselves, many of us fall into the same traps. Here are five of the most common, along with some tips on how to avoid them. 1. To unearth the emotional appeal of your ideas, ask yourself a series of “why” questions. 2. 3. 4. 5. This is the seventh and final post in Nancy Duarte’s blog series on creating and delivering presentations, based on tips from her new book, the HBR Guide to Persuasive Presentations. Read the other posts here: Post #1: How to Present to Senior Executives Post #2: Create a Presentation Your Audience Will Care About Post #3: Do Your Slides Pass the Glance Test Post #4: Structure Your Presentation Like a Story Post #5: Disarm Your Audience When You Present Post #6: Authentic Presentations Take Practice

Why Most People Dream and Only Some Do: The Go-Getter Theory I remember it like it was yesterday. I just won the biggest marble from a boy three years younger than me, and my “best buddy” back then was talking to me on how much he liked his new moped. (He wasn’t legally old enough to drive it on the street, yet he did). He got it from his father who, I believe, up till now still has a bicycle shop. We used to talk about things we’d like to do. He was going to have his own motor-shop one day, while all I could think about at that time was my new marble. Now let’s fast forward to present tense. What differs those who are naturally set to succeed, from others who are not? It boggles my mind why some entrepreneurs make it big while others settle for mediocre or close to nothing results! Lately, I’ve met a lot of business men and students set to create a startup, and I started noticing a few differences… It’s not education, skills or talent; It’s passion, drive and motivation. People who get stuff done strive for “good enough” and go on to the next.

How to Give a Killer Presentation A little more than a year ago, on a trip to Nairobi, Kenya, some colleagues and I met a 12-year-old Masai boy named Richard Turere, who told us a fascinating story. His family raises livestock on the edge of a vast national park, and one of the biggest challenges is protecting the animals from lions—especially at night. Richard had noticed that placing lamps in a field didn’t deter lion attacks, but when he walked the field with a torch, the lions stayed away. From a young age, he’d been interested in electronics, teaching himself by, for example, taking apart his parents’ radio. The story was inspiring and worthy of the broader audience that our TED conference could offer, but on the surface, Richard seemed an unlikely candidate to give a TED Talk. But Richard’s story was so compelling that we invited him to speak. On the basis of this experience, I’m convinced that giving a good talk is highly coachable. Frame Your Story

Why you must reinvent your company every 3.5 years Ask any manager on planet Earth, “What is your key challenge?” and among many different responses one will strike you with remarkable consistency: Staying afloat. The fast-moving roller-coaster economy we live in today makes this task increasingly difficult. The answer is the one you’ve heard before: We must consistently remake who we are, what we offer, and how we deliver our offerings to the world. Let me explain. Once upon a time, our companies enjoyed long and healthy lives, with a slow rise to the top of financial performance and a gradual decline to annihilation. As Steve Denning of Forbes puts it: “Fifty years ago, ‘milking the cash cow’ could go on for many decades. Denning’s claims are supported by research conducted by the Deloitte Center for the Edge in 2001, which is about how corporate life cycles were diminishing rapidly. Does it mean that we are all doomed? But if before you had 30+ years to reach the prime, today you might only have 3 years. (Shocking, isn’t it? Dr.

Barbara Minto's Pyramid Principle by Xianxi NING on Prezi

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