background preloader

Extinct frog hops back into the gene pool

Extinct frog hops back into the gene pool
In what may be considered an early Easter miracle, an extinct species of native frog has begun its rise from the dead. Australian scientists have grown embryos containing the revived DNA of the extinct gastric-brooding frog, the crucial first step in their attempt to bring a species back to life. The team from the aptly named Lazarus project inserted the dead genetic material of the extinct amphibian into the donor eggs of another species of living frog, a process similar to the technique used to create the cloned sheep Dolly. The eggs continued to grow into three-day-old embryos, known as blastulas. Extict since 1983: The bizarre gastric-brooding frog. "This is the first time this technique has been achieved for an extinct species," said one of the project scientists, conservation biologist Michael Mahony. Advertisement Frozen for 40 years In the beginning, the single cell eggs "just sat there", said Professor Archer. The egg donor frog. But the team's success so far did not come easily. Related:  Recent Extinctions (1700 - 2018)Genetics 1

Australian mammals on brink of extinction calamity 10 February 2015Last updated at 07:58 ET By Helen Briggs Environment Correspondent The endangered northern quoll, a mammal species native to Australia Australia has lost one in ten of its native mammals species over the last 200 years in what conservationists describe as an "extinction calamity". No other nation has had such a high rate of loss of land mammals over this time period, according to scientists at Charles Darwin University, Australia. The decline is mainly due to predation by the feral cat and the red fox, which were introduced from Europe, they say. Large scale fires to manage land are also having an impact. As an affluent nation with a small population, Australia's wildlife should be relatively secure from threats such as habitat loss. But a new survey of Australia's native mammals, published in the journal Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, suggests the scale of the problem is more serious than anticipated. Shy species

Chpt 3 One Wrong Letter 25 Pictures of Frogs and Toads RED-EYED TREE FROG – Photograph by MARCUS LIM To deny the awesomeness of frogs would be foolish. They are colourful, they are diverse, and if they were the size of humans, they could leap over buildings! Below you will find 10 facts and 25 pictures about our amphibious friends, the mighty Frog! All hail! Photograph by ANGI NELSON Photograph by DIABLOMAKO The distribution of frogs ranges from tropic to subarctic regions, but most species are found in tropical rainforests. Photograph by ANGI NELSON Photograph by DARK-RAPTOR The use of the common names “frog” and “toad” has no taxonomic justification. Photograph by MY LIVING PHOTOGRAPHY Photograph by AIMISHBOY The morphology of frogs is unique among amphibians. Photograph by SNIC320 Photograph by ARCYNUM Frogs range in size from 10 mm (0.39 in) (Brachycephalus didactylus of Brazil and Eleutherodactylus iberia of Cuba) to 300 mm (12 in) (goliath frog, Conraua goliath, of Cameroon). Photograph by HILDE VAN HOVE Photograph by YOSHIAKI OIKAWA

A moment of silence for the Western Black Rhino Officially extinct Another beautiful species that we won't see again. The western black rhino, which is a sub-species of black rhino, was was once widespread in the savanna of sub-Saharan Africa, but no more. The last individual was spotted in 2006, and after years without any new sightings, it was officially declared extinct by the International Union for Conservation of Nature (IUCN), who maintains the famous Red List of Threatened Species. Wikimedia/Public Domain The IUCN warns that other rhinos could follow saying Africa's northern white rhino is "teetering on the brink of extinction" while Asia's Javan rhino is "making its last stand" due to continued poaching and lack of conservation." Conservation efforts certainly are not futile! Here are some black rhinos (though obviously not western black rhinos...) filmed by the BBC: Via CNN See also: Aw, cute!

What human faces might look like in 100,000 years | Science | The Observer Since we humans are prone to launching chemical weapons, unwittingly killing off the bee population or other factors that could lead to our extinction, it may be presumptuous to imagine what we'll look like in 100,000 years. But designer and researcher Nickolay Lamm has speculated anyway, concluding with some rather startling illustrations that suggest that we'll look a bit like the aliens in Close Encounters of the Third Kind: large, bug eyes, huge foreheads and pigmented skin. It's conjecture, but also more than armchair futurism. Lamm based his illustrations on discussions with Dr Alan Kwan, an expert in computational genomics from Washington University who drew up a research paper to guide Lamm's artwork. Changes in the air and light around us will lead to adjustments in our facial structure, but we'll also be able to change what facial features we're born with, based on what's genetically trendy at the time. Parmy Olson is a technology writer for Forbes magazine in San Francisco.

Colorado River Toad Description[edit] Range of Incilius alvarius in the United States (it also inhabits northwest Mexico) The Colorado River toad can grow to about 7.5 inches (190 mm) long and is the largest toad in the United States apart from the non-native cane toad (Rhinella marina). Distribution and habitat[edit] The Colorado River toad is found in the lower Colorado River and the Gila River catchment areas, in southeastern California, New Mexico, Mexico and much of southern Arizona. Biology[edit] The Colorado River toad is carnivorous, eating small rodents, insects, and small reptiles and other toad species; like many toads, it has a long, sticky tongue which aids it in catching prey. The toads generally breed in small rain pools after the summer showers start; it spends approximately one month as a yellowish-brown tadpole before moving onto the land. Drug use of poision[edit] Ethic[edit] Fresh venom can easily be collected without harm to the toad. State laws[edit] Toad at night in Tucson References[edit]

120 animals that have disappeared in the last 100 years Si no los alcanzaste a conocer, esta es la única forma que se nos ocurre para que sepas que existieron. Es difícil calcular el número de animales extintos y la cifra real siempre es más alta que el número estimado. En algunos casos se puede presumir que una especie ha dejado de existir al no ser vista durante años, sin embargo se debe esperar a que se declare oficialmente este estatus por la Unión Internacional para la Conservación de la Naturaleza. Lo más complejo de este tema, es que la extinción no es un problema histórico, sino que un tema contemporáneo. La lista original contaba con cerca de 120 animales que se han extinto sólo en el último siglo (no incluidos los insectos porque son muy difíciles de catalogar). Nosotros decidimos hacer una selección de los 40 que consideramos más importantes, únicos o extraños para mostrarles. 2013 Leopardo nublado de Formosa, Neofelis nebulosa brachyura 2012 Tortuga gigante de Pinta, Chelonoidis abingdoni 2000 Bucardo, Capra pirenaica pyrenaica

Rediscovering Biology - Case Studies: Designing Cancer Drugs Although they are best known for their use in agriculture to increase yields and fight crop diseases, genetic modification techniques are used in many different areas of biological research, including medicine. In this case study, we'll follow the process of developing an edible vaccine for the hepatitis B virus and explore practical details of genetic engineering techniques. The current hepatitis B vaccine is a recombinant subunit produced in yeast. Subunit vaccines are viral proteins that elicit an immune response without viral genetic material. The current vaccine is effective, but cost-prohibitive for economically challenged areas. Before beginning this case study, you may want to review these related materials: • Genetically Modified Organisms Video • Genetically Modified Organisms Online Text

Frog Photos "I'd kiss a frog even if there was no promise of a Prince Charming popping out of it. I love frogs." ~ Cameron Diaz Funny Frogs by Sean Crane

Related: