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5 Shockingly Advanced Ancient Buildings That Shouldn't Exist

5 Shockingly Advanced Ancient Buildings That Shouldn't Exist
The achievements of ancient cultures tend to be woefully unappreciated -- we think of the people as loincloth-wearing savages, and when we're proven wrong by some impressive feat of engineering, we just make a bunch of documentaries about aliens. But the engineers of times past were nothing to sneer at, and some of their accomplishments make ours seem slightly embarrassing. #5. Derinkuyu's Massive, Ancient Underground City Bjorn Christian Torrissen Derinkuyu's underground city was discovered in the 1960s in Turkey, when a modern house above ground was being renovated. Master Tourism"Do you want to flood it again, just to be sure?" Hidden for centuries right under everyone's noses, Derinkuyu is just the largest of hundreds of underground complexes built by we're-not-sure-who-exactly around the eighth century B.C. Dutch Art Institute"Get the Jim-digger. The Straits TimesAnd doodles of boobs on the desks of the study room. #4. Wikipedia #3. Bernard Gagnon

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Powered By Osteons: Line on the left, one cross each: Bioarchaeology of Crucifixion As a researcher of the classical world, one of my favorite movies is Monty Python's Life of Brian. An irreverent take on the swords-and-sandals perception of the Roman Empire, it takes place in Jerusalem in the early first century AD and focuses on an accidental prophet named Brian. Anyone who's ever taken Latin has probably seen the portion of the film mocking Brian for his poor grasp of the language of power or the scene in which the leaders of the rebellion answer the question "What have the Romans ever done for us?" But the movie also satirizes the pugilistic, callous nature of the Romans in a crucifixion scene: The Romans practiced crucifixion - literally, "fixed to a cross" - for nearly a millennium. Like death by guillotine in early modern times, crucifixion was a public act, but unlike the swift action of the guillotine, crucifixion involved a long and painful - hence, excruciating - death.

Blind people have four times more nightmares than sighted people People who are born blind have more nightmares than sighted people. This may be because blind people have a greatest tendency to experience threats from their surroundings, says the scientists behind the study. (Photo: Shutterstock.com)

1000-year-old coins found in Northern Territory may rewrite Australian history A find of 1000-year-old coins (not pictured) had led archaeologists to launch an expedition that may rewrite Australian history. Source: news.com.au REMEMBER when you were taught that Australia was discovered by James Cook in 1770 who promptly declared it "terra nullius" and claimed it for the British throne?

Robot finds 3 rooms under Feathered Serpent temple A robot named Tláloc II-TC, equipped with an infrared camera and laser scanner, has discovered three new chambers underneath the Temple of the Feathered Serpent pyramid in the Mesoamerican metropolis of Teotihuacan. He was sent down a tunnel 390 feet long that was discovered 50 feet below the surface of the temple in 2003. The tunnel had been filled with debris by the ancient Teotihuacans to block access, an effective technique since despite centuries of looting and archaeological excavations nobody had managed to breach it. It’s been a decade since the subterranean conduit was discovered and five years since excavations began, and archaeologists have only able to get a glimpse of what’s on the other side in the past few months.

Build a $300 underground greenhouse for year-round gardening (Video) Growers in colder climates often utilize various approaches to extend the growing season or to give their crops a boost, whether it's coldframes, hoop houses or greenhouses. Greenhouses are usually glazed structures, but are typically expensive to construct and heat throughout the winter. A much more affordable and effective alternative to glass greenhouses is the walipini (an Aymara Indian word for a "place of warmth"), also known as an underground or pit greenhouse.

"Atlantis" Eruption Twice as Big as Previously Believed, Study Suggests August 23, 2006 A volcanic eruption that may have inspired the myth of Atlantis was up to twice as large as previously believed, according to an international team of scientists. The eruption occurred 3,600 years ago on the Santorini archipelago, whose largest island is Thera. Santorini is located in the Aegean Sea about 125 miles (200 kilometers) southeast of modern-day Greece (map of Greece). The massive explosion may have destroyed the Minoan civilization based on nearby Crete.

Magpies grieve for their dead (and even turn up for funerals) By David Derbyshire for MailOnline Updated: 00:57 GMT, 24 October 2009 With its aggressive behaviour and appetite for young chicks, the magpie doesn't have a particularly good image when it comes to compassion. But according to some experts, the predator may have a tender side, feeling grief and routinely holding 'funerals' for fallen friends.

Sumerian Myths Sumerian civilization originated in what is now southern Iraq, just upriver from the mouths of the Tigris and Euphrates rivers. "Civilization" in this context means a settled town or city-dwelling people who possess a stable agricultural technology (including domesticated animals) and have developed a hierarchical system of social classes (peasants, laborers, slaves, craftsmen [smiths, masons, carpenters, potters, etc.], farmers, fishermen, merchants, doctors, architects, priests and temple attendants, bureaucrats, scribes, advisers, priest-kings). Since the climate of southern Iraq is hot and dry, agriculture requires an extensive irrigation system of canals and dikes. Often, the Sumerians wrote as if their civilization (agricultural techniques, cities, classes of people) came first, and people later.

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