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Instructional design

Instructional design
History[edit] Origins[edit] During World War II, a considerable amount of training materials for the military were developed based on the principles of instruction, learning, and human behavior. Tests for assessing a learner’s abilities were used to screen candidates for the training programs. 1946 – Edgar Dale’s Cone of Experience[edit] In 1946, Dale outlined a hierarchy of instructional methods and their effectiveness.[6] Mid-1950s through mid-1960s - The Programmed Instruction Movement[edit] Early 1960s - The Criterion-Referenced Testing Movement[edit] Robert Glaser first used the term “criterion-referenced measures” in 1962. 1965 - Domains of Learning, Events of Instruction, and Hierarchical Analysis[edit] 1967 - Formative Evaluation[edit] In 1967, after analyzing the failure of training material, Michael Scriven suggested the need for formative assessment – e.g., to try out instructional materials with learners (and revise accordingly) before declaring them finalized.[5] See also[edit] Related:  Instructional DesignInstructional Design

Learning object A learning object is "a collection of content items, practice items, and assessment items that are combined based on a single learning objective".[1] The term is credited to Wayne Hodgins when he created a working group in 1994 bearing the name[2] though the concept was first described by Gerard in 1967.[3] Learning objects go by many names, including content objects, chunks, educational objects, information objects, intelligent objects, knowledge bits, knowledge objects, learning components, media objects, reusable curriculum components, nuggets, reusable information objects, reusable learning objects, testable reusable units of cognition, training components, and units of learning. Learning objects offer a new conceptualization of the learning process: rather than the traditional "several hour chunk", they provide smaller, self-contained, re-usable units of learning.[4] Definitions[edit] The following definitions focus on the relation between learning object and digital media. [edit]

239 Tips for Producing and Managing Flash-based e-Learning Content April 24, 2008 In February and March, 2008, The eLearning Guild conducted a survey of its members, asking for their favorite tips for producing and managing Flash-based e-Learning. A total of 147 members responded to the survey, contributing 239 usable tips on 28 products (17 of which were not included in the original list). The tips range in length from one-sentence ideas all the way up to multi-page discourses. Some are very basic in nature, and others are quite advanced. These tips were different from past surveys in one significant way: Many of them contain detailed ActionScript code that will help you solve common problems. This FREE Digital eBook would not have been possible were it not for a generous contribution to its development from these sponsors: If you're not familiar with their products for e-Learning, or if you haven't checked them out lately, we encourage you to take a look at your earliest convenience. The content of all Guild eBooks is FREE.

Instructional Design What is Instructional Design? | Instructional Design Central What is Instructional Design? What is instructional design? In short, instructional design is the systematic process by which instructional materials are designed, developed, and delivered. The terms instructional design, instructional technology, educational technology, curriculum design, and instructional systems design (ISD), are often used interchangeably. Below are a few instructional design definitions from various resources on instructional design, instructional technology, educational technology, curriculum design, and instructional systems design: Definitions of Instructional Design? Source: www.etec.hawaii.edu Definitions of Curriculum Design? What is an Instructional Designer? What is an instructional designer? What is an Instructional Designer? What is an Educational Technologist? An educational technologists someone who is trained in the field of educational technology. What is a Curriculum Designer?

Rubynorte | Conferência de Ruby no Porto, Portugal. Serious game A serious game or applied game is a game designed for a primary purpose other than pure entertainment. The "serious" adjective is generally prepended to refer to products used by industries like defense, education, scientific exploration, health care, emergency management, city planning, engineering, and politics.[citation needed] Definition and scope[edit] Serious games are simulations of real-world events or processes designed for the purpose of solving a problem. Overview[edit] The term "serious game" has been used long before the introduction of computer and electronic devices into entertainment. Reduced to its formal essence, a game is an activity among two or more independent decision-makers seeking to achieve their objectives in some limiting context. Mike Zyda provided an update and a logical approach to the term in his 2005 article in IEEE Computer entitled, "From Visual Simulation to Virtual Reality to Games". Other authors, though, (as Jeffery R. History[edit] Development[edit]

144 Tips on Synchronous e-Learning Strategy + Research May 29, 2008 The eLearning Guild conducted a survey of its members, asking for their favorite tips relating to strategies for effectively creating, managing, and using synchronous e-Learning. Members could submit tips relating to any or all of five different categories. As is usual in our past surveys, the tips range in length from one-sentence ideas all the way up to multi-page discourses. You will find tips in these categories... Blending Synchronous Learning with Other Learning Modalities Designers of Synchronous Presentations, Courses, and Webinars Managers Who Lead Synchronous Learning Efforts Synchronous Speakers and Instructors Technical Production, Planning, and Preparation This FREE Digital eBook would not have been possible were it not for a generous contribution to its development from Adobe. Depending on the speed of your Internet connection, this document could take a few moments to download because of its size (58 pages in PDF format, ~3MB).

Introduction to Instructional Systems Design | ALISON Course Description Instructional Systems Design is the process of designing and developing instructional courses or materials that bring greater efficiency and effectiveness to acquiring knowledge or skills for learners. This free online course in Instructional Systems Design reviews important aspects such as learning theories and learning objectives and how they influence the design process. It also reviews the role of memory, needs analysis, and design models such as ADDIE (Analysis, Design, Development, Implementation, and Evaluation). Certification To qualify for your official ALISON Diploma, Certificate or PDF you must study and complete all modules and score 80% or more in each of the course assessments. Learning Outcomes Manage a Group of Learners

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