background preloader

Think Python: How to Think Like a Computer Scientist

Think Python: How to Think Like a Computer Scientist
How to Think Like a Computer Scientist by Allen B. Downey This is the first edition of Think Python, which uses Python 2. If you are using Python 3, you might want to use the second edition, which is here. Buy this book at Amazon.com Download Think Python in PDF. Read Think Python in HTML. Example programs and solutions to some problems are here (links to specific examples are in the book). Description Think Python is an introduction to Python programming for beginners. Some examples and exercises are based on Swampy, a Python package written by the author to demonstrate aspects of software design, and to give readers a chance to experiment with simple graphics and animation. Think Python is a Free Book. If you have comments, corrections or suggestions, please send me email at feedback{at}thinkpython{dot}com. Other Free Books by Allen Downey are available from Green Tea Press. Download Precompiled copies of the book are available in PDF. Earlier Versions Translations and adaptations

http://www.greenteapress.com/thinkpython/thinkpython.html

Related:  Python Booksvaggun

Invent Your Own Computer Games with Python - Learn how to program with a free ebook programming tutorial Chapter 1 Read online: Chapter 1 - Installing Python Videos: Chapter 2 Read online: Chapter 2 - The Interactive Shell The 6 Grand Illusions That Keep Us Enslaved to the Matrix By: Sigmund Fraud, Waking Times “In prison, illusions can offer comfort.” – Nelson Mandela For a magician to fool his audience his deceit must go unseen, and to this end he crafts an illusion to avert attention from reality.

Portal:Computer science Vinton Gray Cerfb. 1943 Vinton Gray "Vint" Cerf[1] (/ˈsɜrf/; born June 23, 1943) is an American computer scientist, who is recognized as one of "the fathers of the Internet", sharing this title with American computer scientist Bob Kahn. His contributions have been acknowledged and lauded, repeatedly, with honorary degrees and awards that include the National Medal of Technology, the Turing Award, the Presidential Medal of Freedom, and membership in the National Academy of Engineering. In the early days, Cerf was a program manager for the United States Department of Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency (DARPA) funding various groups to develop TCP/IP technology. When the Internet began to transition to a commercial opportunity during the late 1980s, Cerf moved to MCI where he was instrumental in the development of the first commercial email system (MCI Mail) connected to the Internet.

A byte of Python - Table des Matières You have seen how you can reuse code in your program by defining functions once. What if you wanted to reuse a number of functions in other programs that you write? As you might have guessed, the answer is modules. There are various methods of writing modules, but the simplest way is to create a file with a .py extension that contains functions and variables. Another method is to write the modules in the native language in which the Python interpreter itself was written. The Python Tutorial — Python v3.0.1 documentation Python is an easy to learn, powerful programming language. It has efficient high-level data structures and a simple but effective approach to object-oriented programming. Python’s elegant syntax and dynamic typing, together with its interpreted nature, make it an ideal language for scripting and rapid application development in many areas on most platforms. The Python interpreter and the extensive standard library are freely available in source or binary form for all major platforms from the Python Web site, and may be freely distributed. The same site also contains distributions of and pointers to many free third party Python modules, programs and tools, and additional documentation. The Python interpreter is easily extended with new functions and data types implemented in C or C++ (or other languages callable from C).

Python The Case for Test-Driven Development By Meghan Blanchette March 28, 2014 Harry Percival, author of Test-Driven Web Development with Python, discusses how he got into TDD, why you should too, and shares some tips. In the podcast above, listen to Harry talk candidly about the types of tests that make sense, … Interface Languages and Feature Discovery Cynefin, testing & auditing Over the last few weeks following my CAST 2014 talk in New York, while the Stop 29119 campaign has been raging, I have been thinking more about some of the underlying issues. One of these has been the idea of “best practice”, which led me back to the Cynefin Framework. If you don’t know about Cynefin then I strongly recommend that you learn about it and reflect on its implications. The Wikipedia article is a good start, not least because Dave Snowden, Cynefin’s creator, keeps an eye on it.

World’s first programmable quantum photonic chip A team of engineering geniuses from the University of Bristol, England has developed the world’s first re-programmable, multi-purpose quantum photonic computer chip that relies on quantum entanglement to perform calculations. With multiple waveguide channels (made from standard silicon dioxide), and eight electrodes (see image above), the silicon chip is capable of repeatedly entangling photons. Depending on how the electrodes are programmed, different quantum states can be produced. The end result is two qubits that can be used to perform quantum computing — and unlike D-Wave’s 128-qubit processor (well, depending on who you ask) this is real quantum computing. Most importantly, though, unlike existing quantum photonic setups which require apparatus the size of a “large dining table,” this new chip is tiny: just 70mm (2.7 inches) by 3mm (pictured below) — not exactly a 22nm component size, then, but small enough to squeeze inside a computer; and really, that’s the whole point.

Non-Programmer's Tutorial for Python 3/Print version All example Python source code in this tutorial is granted to the public domain. Therefore you may modify it and relicense it under any license you please. Since you are expected to learn programming, the Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike license would require you to keep all programs that are derived from the source code in this tutorial under that license. Since the Python source code is granted to the public domain, that requirement is waived. This tutorial is more or less a conversion of Non-Programmer's Tutorial for Python 2.6. Making Games with Python and Pygame Book Description This is a programming book that covers the Pygame game library for the Python programming language. Each chapter gives you the complete source code for a new game and teaches the programming concepts from these examples. The book is available under a Creative Commons license and can be downloaded in full for free from This book was written to be understandable by kids as young as 10 to 12 years old, although it is great for anyone of any age who has some familiarity with Python. About the Authors Albert Sweigart (but you can call him Al), is a software developer in San Francisco, California who enjoys bicycling, volunteering, haunting coffee shops, and making useful software. He is originally from Houston, Texas.

Open Classes on Piazza Software Defined Networking Instructor: Nick Feamster, Georgia Tech Start date: May 26th, 2014 Duration: 8 weeks Free Learn more Join Class Linear Circuits Instructor: Bonnie H. Ferri, Georgia Tech Start date: January 6th, 2014 Duration: 9 weeks Free Learn more Join Class Computational Investing, Part I Instructor: Tucker Balch, Georgia Tech Start date: February 22, 2013 Duration: 9 weeks Free Learn more Join Class Game Theory II: Advanced Applications Matthew O. Jackson, Kevin Leyton-Brown, Yoav Shoham Start date: May 27th, 2013 Duration: 7 weeks Free Learn more Join Class Introductory Physics I with Laboratory Instructor: Michael F. Why Living Cells Are The Future Of Data Processing Not all computers are made of silicon. By definition, a computer is anything that processes data, performs calculations, or uses so-called logic gates to turn inputs (for example, 1s and 0s in binary code) into outputs. And now, a small international community of scientists is working to expand the realm of computers to include cells, animals, and other living organisms. Some of their experiments are highly theoretical; others represent the first steps toward usable biological computers.

Related:  E-books