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William Faulkner

William Faulkner
Biography[edit] Faulkner was born William Cuthbert Falkner in New Albany, Mississippi, the first of four sons of Murry Cuthbert Falkner (August 17, 1870 – August 7, 1932) and Maud Butler (November 27, 1871 – October 19, 1960).[3] He had three younger brothers: Murry Charles "Jack" Falkner (June 26, 1899 – December 24, 1975), author John Falkner (September 24, 1901 – March 28, 1963) and Dean Swift Falkner (August 15, 1907 – November 10, 1935). Faulkner was born and raised in the state of Mississippi, which had a great influence on him, as did the history and culture of the American South altogether. Soon after Faulkner's first birthday, his family moved to Ripley, Mississippi from New Albany. Here, his father Murry worked as the treasurer for the family's Gulf & Chicago Railroad Company, a business he had been drawn to from an early age. Murry had hoped to inherit the railroad from his father, John Wesley Thompson Falkner. As a schoolchild, Faulkner had much success early on. Death[edit]

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/William_Faulkner

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