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Amanda Palmer: The art of asking

Amanda Palmer: The art of asking

xPugetSound - Dream Out Loud: Transform Ideas into Action | TEDx | TED.com About this event This year's theme was built upon the foundation of the 2009 TEDxPugetSound. Last year's theme was about reconnecting business owners with the passion that inspired them to start their businesses. This year's TEDxPugetSound is about the critical importance of innovating to stay competitive and fresh and moving forward. Our theme was inspired by this quote by Anais Nin: "Dreams pass into the reality of action. The intention for the event was: • To positively influence, inspire and engage our audience, SMB CEOs • To connect people with ideas, each other and themselves • To help create community in Seattle Confirmed Speakers Scott Belsky SCOTT BELSKY has committed his professional life to help organize creative individuals, teams, and networks.

Revolutionary France The French Revolution began in the domain of philosophy and social theory. French materialist philosophy, social theory and socialist ideas were significant influences on the development of Communism and major contributors to Marx’s ideas. The following writers of Pre-Revolutionary France are significant: Marx gives the following analysis of the history of French Materialism & Communism in The Holy Family, 1845 In his Lectures on the History of Philosophy, Hegel presents the following summary of French Philosophy, 1830. The French Revolution of 1789 The Great French Revolution of 1789 not only overthrew the monarchy in France, but ultimately led to the destruction of the Old Order across Europe. In A Short History of the French Revolution for Socialists., Belfort Bax presents the analysis that Marxists made of the French Revolution in 1890, also Jean-Paul Marat. Babeuf and the Conspiracy of the Equals, Bax 1911. See the French Revolution History Archive. Marx-Engels Letters on France. The PCF

The Holy Family by Marx and Engels The Holy Family Chapter VI 3) d) Critical Battle Against French Materialism “Spinozism dominated the eighteenth century both in its later French variety, which made matter into substance, and in deism, which conferred on matter a more spiritual name.... That is what Criticism says. To the Critical history of French materialism we shall oppose a brief outline of its ordinary, mass-type history. “Speaking exactly and in the prosaic sense”, the French Enlightenment of the eighteenth century, and in particular French materialism, was not only a struggle against the existing political institutions and the existing religion and theology; it was just as much an open, clearly expressed struggle against the metaphysics of the seventeenth century, and against all metaphysics, in particular that of Descartes, Malebranche, Spinoza and Leibniz. “Speaking exactly and in the prosaic sense”, there are two trends in French materialism; one traces its origin to Descartes, the other to Locke.

Mahatma Gandhi Mohandas Karamchand Gandhi (pronounced [ˈmoːɦənd̪aːs ˈkərəmtʃənd̪ ˈɡaːnd̪ʱi] ( ); 2 October 1869 – 30 January 1948) was the preeminent leader of Indian nationalism in British-ruled India. Employing nonviolent civil disobedience, Gandhi led India to independence and inspired movements for civil rights and freedom across the world. The honorific Mahatma (Sanskrit: "high-souled", "venerable"[2])—applied to him first in 1914 in South Africa,[3]—is now used worldwide. He is also called Bapu (Gujarati: endearment for "father",[4] "papa"[4][5]) in India. Gandhi famously led Indians in challenging the British-imposed salt tax with the 400 km (250 mi) Dandi Salt March in 1930, and later in calling for the British to Quit India in 1942. Gandhi is commonly, though not officially,[10] considered the Father of the Nation[11] in India. Early life and background Mohandas Karamchand Gandhi in his earliest known photo, aged 7, c. 1876 English barrister Civil rights movement in South Africa (1893–1914)

Aboriginal Tent Embassy The Aboriginal Tent Embassy is a controversial semi-permanent assemblage claiming to represent the political rights of Aboriginal Australians. It is made up of a group of activists, signs and tents that reside on the lawn of Old Parliament House in Canberra, the Australian capital. It is not considered an official embassy by the Australian Government. History[edit] In February 1972 the Aboriginal Tent Embassy presented a list of demands to Parliament: The demands were rejected, and in July 1972, following an amendment to the relevant ordinance, police moved in, removed the tents and arrested eight people. In October 1973, around 70 Aboriginal protesters staged a sit-in on the steps of Parliament House and the Tent Embassy was re-established. In May 1974 the embassy was destroyed in a storm but was re-established in October. In February 1975 Aboriginal activist Charles Perkins negotiated the "temporary" removal of the embassy with the Government, pending Government action on land rights.

American Indian Movement Flag of the American Indian Movement The American Indian Movement (AIM) is a Native American advocacy group in the United States, founded in 1968 in Minneapolis, Minnesota, with an agenda that focuses on spirituality, leadership, and sovereignty. The founders included Dennis Banks, George Mitchell, Herb Powless, Clyde Bellecourt, Harold Goodsky, Eddie Benton-Banai, and a number of others in the Minneapolis Native American community.[1] Russell Means, born Oglala Lakota, was an early leader in 1970s protests. In October 1972, AIM gathered members from across the country to a protest in Washington, D.C. known as the "Trail of Broken Treaties". AIM gained national attention when it seized the Bureau of Indian Affairs national headquarters and presented a 20-point list of demands to the federal government. In 1973, it led a 71-day armed standoff with federal forces at Wounded Knee, South Dakota, on the Pine Ridge Indian Reservation. Background[edit] 1960s[edit] Presidents John F. Events[edit]

Idle No More Background[edit] After the May 2, 2011 Canadian Federal election, the federal government led by Stephen Harper proposed a number of omnibus bills introducing numerous legislative changes. While omnibus bills had been presented to parliament by previous governments, the perceived ideological nature of the changes proposed in Bill C-45 played to fears of a right-wing agenda held by the Conservatives, particularly concerning the removal of the term "absolute surrender" in Section 208, among others. A number of these measures drew fire from environmental and First Nations groups. Many bills affecting First Nations people have failed to be passed. Vision and Goals[edit] The founders of Idle No More outlined the vision and goals of the movement in a January 10, 2013 press release as follows: The press release also notes that "As a grassroots movement, clearly no political organization speaks for Idle No More".Furthermore, this is not just an Aboriginal Canadian movement. History[edit]

Movements for civil rights Movements for civil rights were a worldwide series of political movements for equality before the law that peaked in the 1960s. In many situations it took the form of campaigns of civil resistance aimed at achieving change through nonviolent forms of resistance. In some situations it was accompanied, or followed, by civil unrest and armed rebellion. The process was long and tenuous in many countries, and many of these movements did not fully achieve their goals, although the efforts of these movements did lead to improvements in the legal rights of previously oppressed groups of people. The main aim of the movements for civil rights included ensuring that the rights of all people are equally protected by the law, including the rights of minorities, women's rights, and LGBT rights. Movement for civil rights in Northern Ireland NICRA originally had five main demands: Civil rights activists all over Northern Ireland soon launched a campaign of civil resistance. Canada's Quiet Revolution

African-American Civil Rights Movement (1954–68) The African-American Civil Rights Movement or 1960s Civil Rights Movement encompasses social movements in the United States whose goals were to end racial segregation and discrimination against black Americans and to secure legal recognition and federal protection of the citizenship rights enumerated in the Constitution and federal law. This article covers the phase of the movement between 1954 and 1968, particularly in the South. A wave of inner city riots in black communities from 1964 through 1970 undercut support from the white community. The emergence of the Black Power movement, which lasted from about 1966 to 1975, challenged the established black leadership for its cooperative attitude and its nonviolence, and instead demanded political and economic self-sufficiency. During the same time as African Americans were being disenfranchised, white Democrats imposed racial segregation by law. Characteristics of the post-Reconstruction period: Racial segregation.

Civil Rights Movement - Black History The civil rights movement was a struggle for social justice that took place mainly during the 1950s and 1960s for blacks to gain equal rights under the law in the United States. The Civil War had officially abolished slavery, but it didn’t end discrimination against blacks—they continued to endure the devastating effects of racism, especially in the South. By the mid-20th century, African Americans had had more than enough of prejudice and violence against them. They, along with many whites, mobilized and began an unprecedented fight for equality that spanned two decades. Jim Crow Laws During Reconstruction, blacks took on leadership roles like never before. In 1868, the 14th Amendment to the Constitution gave blacks equal protection under the law. To marginalize blacks, keep them separate from whites and erase the progress they’d made during Reconstruction, “Jim Crow” laws were established in the South beginning in the late 19th century. World War II and Civil Rights Rosa Parks Sources

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