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3 Paths Toward A More Creative Life

3 Paths Toward A More Creative Life
Everyone can learn to be more creative, but to become very creative, I’ve come to believe you need to lead a creative life. In watching my best students, in examining the lives of successful entrepreneurs, and in seeing the process of the great Native American artists who I know, it is clear that how they live their daily lives is crucial to their success. I realize that it sounds very “zen-y” (which is OK by me), yet I come to this realization not through a search for spirituality or clarity but from simple observation. Creativity is in such demand today that when we apply for jobs, when we join organizations, or when we just meet other people, we are asked to present our creative selves. But we can’t do that unless we understand the nature of our own creativity, locate the sources of our originality, and have a language that explains our work. If you are one of the growing number of “creatives,” or want to become one, you need to lead a creative life. 1. For good reason. 2. 3.

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How to hack your body language for better interviews Research interviews go best when participants feel comfortable and confident — they’re more verbal, more willing to explore, and more willing to play along. So when an interview isn’t going well, I check for signs of low status in the person I’m interviewing and adjust my body language to make them feel more in charge. (These techniques come from improv theater classes I took many years ago in San Francisco. In addition to learning about “yes and,” listening, and teamwork, I was introduced to the important concept of status — and how body language communicates high and low status.) How to spot signs of low status If you’re interviewing someone (for research purposes or otherwise) and see these symptoms, the other person is probably feeling low status and not giving you their best possible participation.

4 Things We Have Wrong About Creativity “Creativity” may not be the first word that comes to mind when you hear the word “conglomerate.” But Christian Stadil, CEO and co-owner of Denmark-based Thornico, a sprawling enterprise with holdings in food, technology, shipping, and others, will likely change your mind about that. Stadil is so enthusiastic about the concept of creativity that he has co-authored a new book with psychology professor Lenne Tanggaard, who teaches at the University of Aalborg in Denmark. In the Shower with Picasso, out in May, looks at creativity in business, the arts, and other areas and explores how we can all become more creative. In doing so, Stadil says the duo discovered that some of the very fundamental beliefs we have about creativity are wrong. Here, he shares four common misconceptions.

Creative Problem Solving with SCAMPER SCAMPER is a technique you can use to spark your creativity and help you overcome any challenge you may be facing. In essence, SCAMPER is a general-purpose checklist with idea-spurring questions — which is both easy to use and surprisingly powerful. It was created by Bob Eberle in the early 70s, and it definitely stood the test of time. In this posting, I present a complete SCAMPER primer, along with two free creativity-boosting resources: a downloadable reference mind map and an online tool that generates random questions to get you out of a rut whenever you need. SCAMPER Primer SCAMPER is based on the notion that everything new is a modification of something that already exists. 4 Ways To Amplify Your Creativity The holidays are over, the weather is lousy, and we’re sober again. We made all kinds of New Year’s promises, but the big one that will change our careers, if not our lives, is the promise to ourselves to become more creative. In my new book, Creative Intelligence, I show that creativity is learned behavior that gets better with training--like sports. You can make creativity routine and a regular part of your life.

Why We Need More Small Ideas I'm always a little saddened when I see people who are unhappy with their jobs and spend a lot of time sitting around waiting for the next big idea to drop into their laps. Sometimes in conversations with these people, I find myself thinking of how thin the line really is between praying and whining, and how easy it is to cross. These people are thinking too large. Best of the Web Book Marketing Tips for the Week of September 24, 2012 We’ve collected some of the best book marketing Tweets from the past week, courtesy of bloggers, marketers, authors and others. The topics include Facebook marketing tips to improve engagement, getting credible – not fake – book reviews, making your book pitch stand out, and much more. Happy marketing! * 5 Unbreakable Laws of Self-Publishing (Photo credit: Wikipedia) First, start thinking like a publisher:

Twelve Things You Were Not Taught in School About Creative Thinking 2342 486Share Synopsis Aspects of creative thinking that are not usually taught. 1. You are creative. Crush the "I'm Not Creative" Barrier - Jeff Dyer, Hal Gregersen, and Clayton M. Christensen by Jeff Dyer, Hal Gregersen, and Clayton M. Christensen | 10:50 AM May 7, 2012 Did you know that if you think you are creative, you’re more likely to actually be creative? The Daily Rituals Of The World's Most Creative People And What You Can Learn From Them The novelist Patricia Highsmith worked in bed surrounded by cigarettes, an ashtray, matches, a mug of coffee, a doughnut and a cup full of sugar. According to Mason Currey, the author of the entertaining and enlightening new book, Daily Rituals: How Artists Work, she also liked to have a stiff drink before she settled down to write, “to reduce her energy levels, which veered toward the manic.” Daily Rituals chronicles the routines of genius-level artists, writers, composers, and philosophers--Beethoven, Kafka, Chuck Close, and John Cheever are among those included.

10 Brilliant Social Psychology Studies Ten of the most influential social psychology experiments. “I have been primarily interested in how and why ordinary people do unusual things, things that seem alien to their natures.Why do good people sometimes act evil?Why do smart people sometimes do dumb or irrational things?” –Philip Zimbardo Like eminent social psychologist Professor Philip Zimbardo (author of The Lucifer Effect: Understanding How Good People Turn Evil), I’m also obsessed with why we do dumb or irrational things. Creativity is rejected: Teachers and bosses don’t value out-of-the-box thinking. Illustration by Rob Donnelly In the United States we are raised to appreciate the accomplishments of inventors and thinkers—creative people whose ideas have transformed our world. We celebrate the famously imaginative, the greatest artists and innovators from Van Gogh to Steve Jobs. Viewing the world creatively is supposed to be an asset, even a virtue.

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