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Google Looks to Make Its Computer Glasses Stylish

Google Looks to Make Its Computer Glasses Stylish
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Fashion Innovations in 3D Printing Iris van Herpen & Daniel Widrig's 2010 collaboration with .MGX by Materialise TICKETS SOLD OUT!View the event on Livestream. As part of the Computational Fashion program series, Eyebeam presents an exciting event featuring designers and producers using cutting edge 3D printing techniques to push the boundaries of fashion. Join us as our featured presenters discuss and demo their work, highlighting unique collaborations taking place in NYC between fashion designers, technologists, and manufacturers. PresentersJoris Debo, Creative Director (.MGX by Materialise)Duann Scott, Designer Evangelist (Shapeways)Bradley Rothenberg, architect and Gabi Asfour, designer (threeASFOUR)Alexandra Samuel, Dan Selden, and Ross Leonardy (Crowd Control) Presentations followed by reception

Burberry is the First Fashion Brand With a Channel on Apple Music - Fashionista If there are two non-fashion industries that Burberry has most clearly aligned itself with during Christopher Bailey's tenure, they would be music and technology, the latter being a space in which the brand has prided itself on being an early adopter. At London Fashion Week a year ago, Burberry became the first fashion brand to test out Twitter's buy button. So it's wholly unsurprising that the British brand has decided to launch a channel on Apple Music, the $9.99-a-month streaming service that Apple unveiled in June. It's the first designer label to do so — although not the first player from the fashion world at large: Vogue has a channel, too. The channel, which will feature videos in addition to playlists, will live in the "Curators" section of Apple Music. Advertisement — Continue reading below

London Fashion Week 2015: From catwalk to High Street 24 February 2015Last updated at 19:03 ET By Harriet Hall BBC News Inside London Fashion Week Twice a year, London's grand neoclassical Somerset House, welcomes a tumult of fashion designers and their models dressed in their finest gladrags. The courtyard becomes the centre of London Fashion Week - a far cry from the building's sober past as home to the Inland Revenue. This year sees the event's 61st year, during which more than 250 designers will showcase their collections for autumn and winter to a global audience. For those outside the fashion industry, it can be difficult to appreciate why this week is so important. Indeed, watching the crowds teetering on vertiginous heels, heads topped with designer sunglasses, arms toting handbags and hands clutching smartphones, it is easy to understand why. Yet while it may look like a big party to outsiders, the week is a crucial one for the industry. Some catwalk fashions may seem outlandish or frivolous.... Trickle-down trends “Start Quote

Wearable technology, la technologie InStyle ! La Wearable Technology, tout le monde en parle, mais le concept reste encore un peu abstrait. D’abord parce que la technologie se perfectionne à peine ; 2012 a vu naître les premiers projets réellement aboutis, fonctionnels et commercialisables. Ensuite parce que la Wearable Technology, c’est bien, c’est beau mais c’est cher ! Alors entrons dans le monde merveilleux de la « technologie qui se porte » ! Le principe : intégrer la technologie aux objets qui ne nous encombrent pas ceux que nous portons, en opposition à ceux que nous transportons. Selon fastcodesign.com, il existe 4 règles pour concevoir de la Wearable Tech que les gens vont réellement porter (comprenez acheter) : 1/ Comprendre et être attentif à l’environnement de l’utilisateur. 2/ Concevoir un objet discret. 3/ Créer une valeur ajoutée en le connectant à des services et des logiciels. 4/ Faire en sorte que l’objet ne soit pas marqué trop « geek ». Pure technologie Pantalon Beauty And The Geek Zioneyez HD video glasses

Shoes Clothes & Fashion - Online Shopping at Zalora Philippines "Technology adds an incredible advantage to fashion design" Fashion and technology: in the first part of a series focusing on designers who are introducing the fashion world to new technologies, Dezeen speaks to architect Julia Körner about how advances in 3D scanning, modelling and printing are creating a "revolution in customised fashion pieces within ready to wear" (+ interview + slideshow). 3D-printed garments have become a common sight on the Haute Couture catwalks of designers like Dutch fashion designer Iris van Herpen. Austrian architect Julia Körner, who collaborated with Van Herpen on these digitally fabricated garments, is now working on transferring the technology used to create the elaborate garments into everyday clothing production as part of what she calls an "exciting moment in fashion design". "Body scanning and 3D-modelling techniques allow you to design towards a perfect fit, and through minimal changes in the code I can create variations of adaptations in the design," she told Dezeen.

Internet-connected LED T-shirt lets you flash the world | Crave T-shirts have long been used to express opinions, assert individuality, and spread messages. The tshirtOS prototype is trying to become the first commercially available programmable, Internet-connected digital T-shirt. The shirt is a joint venture between high-tech fashion company CuteCircuit and Scotch whisky maker Ballantine's. The shirt features an integrated LED display, microphone, speaker, and accelerometer.

Washing Wearable Electronics The most common question we get regarding wearable electronics is "how do you wash that?" This guide covers the most common ways to launder your DIY wearable electronics projects. First, and always: remove the batteries! The fiberglass, plastic, and metal comprising most circuits can handle getting wet and a bit of agitation, but your batteries should never be bent, shorted, or be subject to water or heat. Second, read the label on your garment. Machine wash? Components that can fill with water, like the microphone in the Ampli-Tie, should never be submerged in water. If you hand or machine wash your wearables, we strongly recommend hanging them up or laying flat to dry.

Google reveals Android Wear, an operating system for smartwatches Google is officially getting into wearables. The company has announced Android Wear, a version of the operating system designed specifically for wearable devices. To start with, the system is made for smartwatches, and Google is moving aggressively to make itself the key name in wearables. The company has released two videos that show off what the watch interface will look like, and from what we've seen, it's very impressive. In addition, Motorola and LG have already revealed their first Android Wear smartwatches, which look more attractive than any smartwatches we've seen to date. Motorola's first device is featured in the picture above and the videos below. There are several key features that have been announced. The company will also be using Google Now in the watches. You'll also be able to say "OK Google" to perform voice searches, à la Google Now. In many ways, Android Wear seems like it's built off of the work the company did on Google Glass.

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