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The 90 Best Lifehacks of 2009: The Year in Review

The 90 Best Lifehacks of 2009: The Year in Review
Another year is winding down, and that means it’s time to take a look back at what we’ve done here at Lifehack over the last 12 months. 2009 was a scary year for a lot of people – corporate layoffs, a shaky global economy, stunningly vicious politics, old wars grinding on and new ones flaring up. In the midst of all this, though, many saw opportunities; with the myth of life-long corporate employment shattered as some of the world’s biggest companies teetered on the brink of collapse, entrepreneurship enjoyed a major resurgence. This rise in self-reliance extends beyond our work life, too – people are embracing a do-it-yourself, person-to-person lifestyle where status and the display of wealth matter much less than authenticity and social interaction. All of this is reflected in the posts that went up on this site over the last year. What emerges from all this is a treasure trove of good advice, ranging from the lofty and idealistic to the immediately practical. Software and Technology Related:  Stepcase Lifehack

The 80 Best Lifehacks of 2008 And so we arrive yet again at the end of another year. 2008 was at best a mixed bag – while the world was electrified by the US election and it’s promise of change, the global economy was shaken to its core as a decade of financial mismanagement and willful blindness finally caught up with us. Gas prices spiked, leading us all to ask some difficult questions about sustainability, efficiency, and consumption – and then plummeted, leaving us feeling somewhat relieved, but baffled by the unpredictability of it all. As we roll into 2009, there is an atmosphere of suspenseful anticipation, of hope mixed with not a little uncertainty. Companies are streamlining to prepare for the worst, even as entrepreneurs look ahead to new opportunities. Overall, it seems that now is a time for shaking off the dust, clearing away the debris of the past, and looking towards the future. Here at Lifehack, we’ve always followed a path of cautious optimism. Communication Fitness/Health Lifestyle Productivity

The 100 Best Lifehacks of 2011: The Year in Review Another year is coming to a close this weekend, and it’s been a banner one here at Lifehack. As you’ll see below, one of our most popular posts of 2011 was our 100 Best Lifehacks of 2010 article, which flows nicely into this post which will outline the 100 Best Lifehack of 2011. Unlike last year’s list, there’s a few changes we put into place before delivering this list to our readers. First off, the overall top 10 posts are determined by overall traffic during the past year, as well as engagement on social networks. Those 90 posts were decided on based on visits to each article, social media interaction, comments and then were finally curated by the Lifehack editorial team. You’ve got a lot of reading to do here, os let’s get started… Top 10 Most Popular Posts in 2011 Communication Lifestyle Management Money Productivity Technology Thanks to all of the Lifehack contributors, without whom this list would not have been possible. (Photo credit: 2011 on the beach of sunrise via Shutterstock)

The 100 Best Lifehacks of 2010: The Year in Review Happy New Year everyone! It’s the first week of 2011 and many of us are getting ready to kick off the brand new year with a big bang. As we start off 2011 with our new resolutions and goals, let us now look back at the best posts at Lifehack in the past year. In this review post, I have gathered 100 of the best LifeHack articles in 2010. These articles have been selected based on your votes and how much YOU have talked about them in social media (Facebook and Twitter). Do not attempt to read this whole post at once! Let me start off with the top 10 most popular life hack posts out of the 100s of posts published in 2010. Following which, I’ll present the 100 top articles presented in the 11 catetgories. Top 10 Most Popular Posts in 2010: Overall Personal Growth Maximizing Productivity and GTD Lifestyle and Habits Inspiration & Motivation Goal Achievement & Success Emotional Mastery People Skills & Relationships Communications & Writing Business & Career Creativity & Inspiration Family Miscellaneous

13 Strategies To Jumpstart Your Productivity Looking to increase your productivity? You’ve come to the right article. I don’t claim to be a productivity master (I always think there’s room for improvement), but I am very passionate about increasing productivity. I’m always looking for different ways to be more productive – stealing pockets of time where I can, deprioritizing the unimportant, getting system overhauls, etc. In this article, I have selected 13 of my best productivity strategies – tried, tested and validated. Here they are :D 1. Probably half of the self-help articles out there keeps telling us to set goals and set targets. I do regular goal setting to maximize my output. Be clear on what exactly you want to achieve. Further reading: 2. Does your work environment encourage you to work? Those of you who are employed can’t exactly choose the environment to work in. Further Reading 3. Having an organized work desk will undoubtedly help improve your productivity. Further Reading: 4. 5. Hence, time box your tasks. 6. 7. 8.

Simple Ways To Organize Your Files In Mac Most modern computer users might find it difficult to imagine living in the time when the size of computer hard disks was within the range of a few megabytes. But users from the early days of computers knew the storage space limitation so well that they learned to be very selective in choosing which files to keep and which files to throw away. Thanks to the luxury of virtually unlimited storage space that we have today, computer users have developed the “save everything now, think about them later” attitude. The problem is, for some “too many things to do” people ““ like me (and maybe most of you) – “later” might never come. Then one day, the hundredth time you find yourself rummaging your hard drive(s) for that one specific file that you really need without a clue about the file identity, you’ll wish you’d done something earlier in the file-organizing department. The Grouping & The Searching Problems arise when you have to decide where to put files from Project X that are also a MP3.

Start Every Day as a Producer, Not a Consumer I have to agree that my most productive days are those where I don't allow myself to read the news, check e-mail, facebook, etc., right after I get up. However, that happens because I've got a ton of stuff to get done, and the outside world takes a back seat until my workload is under control. However, there are certain biological necessities that have to happen before I can be productive. The dog gets let out, I go to the bathroom, I eat/drink something, and *then* I sit down to be productive. I also *have* to check my e-mail, because if something blew up overnight or there's something that needs to be dealt with ASAP, I need to know as early as possible. Flagged

20 Quick Tips For Better Time Management - Stepcase Lifehack Are you usually punctual or late? Do you finish things within the time you stipulate? Do you hand in your reports/work on time? Are you able to accomplish what you want to do before deadlines? Are you a good time manager? If your answer is “no” to any of the questions above, that means you’re not managing your time as well as you want. Create a daily plan. Do you have any tips to be a better time manager? Polyphasic Sleep: Facts and Myths Contents The law of accelerating returns We live in the times of accelerating acceleration. The Moore's Law makes the world smaller, faster, more connected and more efficient. We are now able to touch and feel Kurzweil's generalization: the law of accelerating returns . The fast-living young generation is hungry for more. At the same time, the myth-making power of the human mind is now grotesquely amplified by the all-mighty Internet. Around the year 2000, a new meme cropped up in several blogs on the net: The Uberman's Sleep Schedule. The Uberman's Sleep Schedule The idea behind the Uberman's Sleep Schedule is to gain waking hours by sleeping the total of just 3 hours in 6 portions distributed equally throughout the day. The Uberman's Sleep Schedule was proposed in this blog at Everything2. Polyphasic sleep More and more frequently, Uberman's Sleep Schedule was being referred to as polyphasic sleep (the term popularized by research and book by an Italian chronobiologist Dr.

Why Being A Perfectionist May Not Be So Perfect Are you a perfectionist? Do you spend a lot of time “perfecting” your work,so everything comes out the way you want it to? I believe all of us are perfectionists in our own right. And a dedication towards perfection undoubtedly helps us to achieve great results. How so? We become less efficient. However, the problem isn’t perfectionism. The problem is when the quest for perfectionism turns into an obsession – so much so that the perfectionist becomes neurotic over gaining “perfection” and refuses to accept anything less than perfect. The answer isn’t to stop being a perfectionist. Here are my 8 personal tips on how we can be healthy perfectionists. Draw a line. Are you a perfectionist? Image: doublej11 Read full content

Working in Project Space - Stepcase Lifehack One of the givens in David Allen’s Getting Things Done is that you can’t “do” a project. Instead, Allen recommends you break projects down into immediate “next actions”, discrete doable chunks that can be “cranked through” with a minimum of effort. While this approach works pretty well for a lot of tasks, it falls short for a lot of creative people for whom the “meat” of their work cannot easily be reduced to simple tasks. Let me give you an example. Of course, there are smaller tasks involved in writing, but it would be foolish to think of them as separate actions, and even more foolish to write them down in my lists. Have an idea Construct an argument Shape persuasive paragraphs Develop my thesis Support argument with evidence And so on… Knowing where to draw the line around a specific action is already a sticking point for a lot of new GTD’ers. Project Flow is the Opposite of Next Actions Creating the Project Space There are two kinds of mindsets that things are done in.

How to Do a Proper Self-Review and Identify Your Professional Pain Points (Before Your Boss Does) SExpand It's the end of the year, which means it's performance review season for many of you at work. Ideally, there should be no surprises in your review, but we've all thought that before. This year, give yourself a self-review so you'll have all the ammo you need to respond to criticism and suggest improvements long before your boss confronts you. Here's how to make that self-review less painful and more useful—not just for this year, but for your whole career. Self-reviews are usually the worst part of performance review season. In this post, we'll walk you through doing a real, private self-review, identifying your professional pain points and irritations, and then coming up with solutions that you can bring to the table when you meet with your boss. Step One: Write Down What You Do, What Others Think You Do, and What You Should Be DoingP The first thing you need to do is get clear on what it is you actually do every day, and compare that with what your job description says you do.

Avoid Distractions! Now! How can we more effectively avoid short-term temptations to achieve long-term goals ? Two leading researchers argue that framing our goals with "width" and "consistency" makes a big difference. Ayelet Fishbach (University of Chicago) and Benjamin Converse (University of Virginia) argue that the necessary first step to overcoming temptation is to identify a conflict between potential temptations and higher-order (often longer-term) goals. Of course, the notion of a temptation is always relative to current goals. Temptation in this regard is a moving target. What was a temptation today can be a goal tomorrow. One of the problems with temptations is that they can seem relatively harmless. Fishbach and Converse offer up two perspective-taking strategies that facilitate the identification of conflict with these temptations (what they call - those single instances of consumption that would have negative consequences and are pervasive in our lives). How will you frame your goals today?

Tips, Tools, & Tinkering: 110 Years of <em>Popular Mechanics</em> DIY In one of our very first issues, back in 1902, we told the story of an Illinois schoolboy named Mark Richards, who built an automobile for himself. By saving money from his after-school job blacking stoves, Richards cobbled together enough parts to assemble a runabout that rolled on four skinny tires and was powered by a single-cylinder engine. "I had no knowledge of the principles and practice of gasoline engine construction," Richards said, "yet I not only managed to make it but to build the transmission mechanism, friction clutch, spark-timing mechanism, body running gear, etc., even doing the necessary blacksmithing... I stuck to the job and am gratified with the result." If Mark Richards were alive today, he would love the story of Bob Dullam, a sculptor in Kalamazoo, Mich., who received one of our 2009 Backyard Genius Awards for building a replica of the Tumbler Batmobile. To guide the masses, the early issues of Popular Mechanics were aimed at the initiated.

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