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The City that Ended Hunger

The City that Ended Hunger
A city in Brazil recruited local farmers to help do something U.S. cities have yet to do: end hunger. posted Feb 13, 2009 “To search for solutions to hunger means to act within the principle that the status of a citizen surpasses that of a mere consumer.”CITY OF BELO HORIZONTE, BRAZIL In writing Diet for a Small Planet, I learned one simple truth: Hunger is not caused by a scarcity of food but a scarcity of democracy. But that realization was only the beginning, for then I had to ask: What does a democracy look like that enables citizens to have a real voice in securing life’s essentials? To begin to conceive of the possibility of a culture of empowered citizens making democracy work for them, real-life stories help—not models to adopt wholesale, but examples that capture key lessons. The city agency developed dozens of innovations to assure everyone the right to food, especially by weaving together the interests of farmers and consumers. “I knew we had so much hunger in the world. Related:  Feed The People

The Expert Enough Manifesto The Expert Enough Manifesto is licensed under a Creative Commons License. Feel free to share the work anywhere, please just link back here if you don’t mind. New: order the Expert Enough Manifesto as a poster at CafePress! This is what we’re all about. Expert Enough is here to inspire you to learn more, do more, be more. Life is richest when we become good at a lot of different things. If you agree, we’d love to consider you a regular reader. We’ll be sharing tips, how-to articles, interviews with experts, case studies and more on all kinds of topics from psychology to technology, from food to fitness, from inspiration to perspiration. Sign up for email or RSS updates and follow us on Twitter or Facebook. Thanks Holstee for the inspiration. Turning your skills and expertise into a way to support yourself is more doable than you might think. There’s this big misconception about expertise, that you have to be one of the world’s top experts before you can earn a living from what you know.

Adaptable House caters for growing family, home office, retired living, or divorce It uses sliding partitions and storage walls, extension modules and a puzzle of garden components. Danish architects Henning Larsen's new Adaptable House is designed to accommodate the most common lifestyle changes, from having children to settling into retirement. The energy-efficient home can even be fairly separated in case of divorce. View all Realized with developers Realdania Byg and contractors GXN, the Adaptable House not only offers flexible room arrangements, but has a built-in strategy for extending and separating volumes. Pre-figuring life changes The Adaptable House was conceived to help meet a range of lifestyle changes. Perhaps the most innovative and coolly pragmatic gesture is in adapting for divorce. Sliding partitions make flexible interiors (Photo: Jesper Ray/Realdania Byg) Not just a room under the stairs The architects were determined that any new configurations meet their criteria for natural light, ventilation, plus noise and temperature control. Adding on

Homepage I teach undergraduate and graduate courses in Community, Food and Agriculture (45% of my appointment). My research focuses on the “food system” (55% of my appointment). The food system involves all of the steps required to produce food and get it to our plates–from farming and processing to distribution and consumption. My work is unified by three main questions, (1) what changes are occurring? These questions drive two main projects, (1) characterizing consolidation in food and beverage industries, and (2) bridging information gaps between producers and consumers through ecolabels. Please note: the book/film database is not always viewable in Firefox or Chrome. Recent Information Graphics Organic Processing Industry Structure, February 2014Global Seed Industry Structure, 1996 to 2013Concentration in the U.S. Getter, Kristin L., Bridget K. Student Publications Herrnstadt, Zachary B. 2014. Philip H.

Easy Change Floating Photo Wall I'm a part-time professional photographer and I love taking pictures! Sometimes I work really hard to take an idea in my head and turn it into a finished picture. Like everyone else, I share my pictures online with friends and family, but I really want to display some of my images at home. Typically when you want to print out an image to display in your home you can do one of two things. 1) Print your photo online or at a local store like Wal-mart for as little money as possible, usually a few cents to a few dollars, and throw it in a cheap frame for another few dollars. 2) Visit a local printer, have your image printed professionally, take it to a framer and have it professionally framed. Now of course their are compromises between these two options but the point is that if you want to print and frame something, especially a larger size, 8x10 and larger, it gets expensive quickly, even if you print and frame the picture yourself.

In Photos: Artwork created from discarded cigarette butts In Photos: Artwork created from discarded cigarette butts Cigarettes aren’t only bad for your health but statistics point out that they’re even worse for the environment. According to recent statistics, about 1.1 billion people in the world are smokers and about 10 million cigarettes are purchased every minute around the world. Apart from creating a plume of toxic gases, cigarettes leave a much longer effect on the environment in the form of cigarette butts. Cigarette butts can take up to 12 years to degrade. • Tom Deininger’s Artwork: • Jesus Bubu Negron Cigarette Butt Carpet: • Cigarette butt clothing: • Anti-Smoking Campaign art made using 15,000 cigarette butts: • Pacifier Made From Cigarette Butts: • Jeremey Drenner’s Tree made with cigarette butts: • Pillow made from cigarette butts: • A dress from cigarette butts • Ornamental shrubs out of cigarette butts: • Sharad Haksar Super Anti-Smoking Messages: Enjoyed this post? Categories: Uncategorized Tags:

The Safeway Foundation. About Us — Charitable Foundation The Safeway Foundation supports causes that impact our customers' lives. Our stores provide the opportunity to mobilize funding and create awareness in our neighborhoods through our employees' passion, partnerships with our vendors, and the generous contributions by our customers. We focus on giving locally in the areas of health and human services, hunger relief, education and helping people living with disabilities. Health and Human Services We sponsor organizations that are engaged in health research and nutritional programs. Hunger Relief As one of the largest grocery retailers in North America, we find that supporting hunger relief programs is a natural fit for us. Education Our commitment to education stretches back to the very beginnings of our company. Helping People with Disabilities We have long supported regional and national programs that assist people with disabilities. Supporting Causes that Improve Lives

Uchronia: The Alternate History List GARBAGE DREAMS | Documentary Film | Independent Lens “Expertly weaving personal fears, family tensions, and political action, GARBAGE DREAMS records the tremblings of a culture at a crossroads.”—New York Times On the outskirts of Cairo lies the world's largest garbage village. A labyrinth of narrow roadways camouflaged by trash, the village is home to 60,000 Zaballeen — Arabic for "garbage people." Filmed over four years, GARBAGE DREAMS follows three teenage boys born into the Zaballeen's trash trade: 17-year-old Adham, 16-year-old Osama, and 18-year-old Nabil. With a population of 18 million, Cairo — the largest city in the Middle East and Africa — has no sanitation service. In 2003, following the international trend to privatize services, Cairo sold multimillion dollar contracts to three corporations to pick up the city's garbage. Suddenly faced with the globalization of their trade, Adham and Osama are each forced to make choices that will impact their futures and the survival of the Zaballeen community. Play the GARBAGE DREAMS Game >>

La Via Campesina : International Peasant Movement Six Word Stories Environmental Toxins Article, Toxicology Information, Chemical Facts My journalist-as-guinea-pig experiment is taking a disturbing turn. A Swedish chemist is on the phone, talking about flame retardants, chemicals added for safety to just about any product that can burn. Found in mattresses, carpets, the plastic casing of televisions, electronic circuit boards, and automobiles, flame retardants save hundreds of lives a year in the United States alone. These, however, are where they should not be: inside my body. Åke Bergman of Stockholm University tells me he has received the results of a chemical analysis of my blood, which measured levels of flame-retarding compounds called polybrominated diphenyl ethers. "I hope you are not nervous, but this concentration is very high," Bergman says with a light Swedish accent. In fact I'm a writer engaged in a journey of chemical self-discovery. Now I'm learning more than I really want to know. Bergman wants to get to the bottom of my flame-retardant mystery. "What about airplanes?" "Yah," he says, "do you fly a lot?"

Reinstating Local Food, Local Rules NOTE: This is a guest post from Siena Chrisman, Manager of Strategic Partnerships and Alliances at WhyHunger, with excerpts from Andrianna Natsoulas’ Food Voices. In the spring of 2010, WhyHunger began a partnership with Andrianna Natsoulas, longtime food sovereignty activist and author of the forthcoming book Food Voices: Stories of the Food Sovereignty Movement. Food Voices captures the testimonies and images of farmers and fisherfolks across five countries who are fighting for a just, sustainable and sovereign food system; a food system that values quality over quantity, communities over individuals, and the environment over the corporate bottom-line. Andrianna talked to Maine farmer, and WhyHunger partner, Bob St. “For me,” Bob says, “food sovereignty means being able to farm and care for a piece of land in a way that I feel is appropriate, without having market forces dictate what or how I grow.

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