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PBL Made Easy With Blended Learning

PBL Made Easy With Blended Learning
What is Project Based Learning? “Project-based learning is a dynamic approach to teaching in which students explore real-world problems and challenges. With this type of active and engaged learning, students are inspired to obtain a deeper knowledge of the subjects they’re studying.” Common Characteristics of PBL: Hands onInquiry drivenCollaborativeStudent centeredRelevantTackles real world challengesShared with larger community or audience How is PBL aligned with Common Core? Emphasizes communication Stresses real world relevance Encourages higher-order thinking skills – analysis, synthesis, evaluation & creation! Goals of PBL: Develop flexible knowledge & adaptive expertiseMotivate self-directed learningTeach effective problem solvingDrive inquiryLearn how to communicate & collaborateImprove intrinsic motivationShift to active learning Web 2.o Tools to Support a Blended Approach to PBL: Project based learning by nature takes time. Google search - search engine for finding great information. Related:  Project-Based Learning

Six Steps for Planning a Successful Project Sure, King Middle School has some amazing projects, but the Portland school has been refining its expeditionary learning projects for nearly two decades. David Grant, who guides the school's technology integration and curriculum development, has put together a six-step rubric for designing a project. He says Fading Footprints, which became a model for King and Expeditionary Learning Schools, doesn't take an entire school, or even a team of twelve, to plan and carry out; one or two teachers can tailor this one to fit their time and resources. Six Steps to Planning a Project The Fading Footsteps project is a twelve-week interdisciplinary ecology unit centered around the guiding question: How does diversity strengthen an ecosystem? Using this project as an example, see how King Middle School creates an action plan around each step. How they do it: The 1-to-1 laptop program was a bonus when it came to creating a comprehensive final product. Step 5: Coordinate calendars.

BlendKit Course: BlendKit Reader: Chapter 4 Course Home | Schedule | Learning Activities | DIY Tasks | Readings | Blogging | Real Time Sessions/Archive Chapter 1 | Chapter 2 | Chapter 3 | Chapter 4 | Chapter 5 Edited by Kelvin Thompson, Ed.D. Portions of the following chapter are adapted from “Teaching Blended Learning Courses” in Best Practices in Online Teaching by Larry Ragan under the terms of a Creative Commons Attribution 2.0 license and “New Learners? New Educators? Questions to Ponder In what experiences (direct or vicarious) will you have students participate during your blended learning course? Content + Assignments = Modules Having given due attention to articulating learning outcomes (Chapter 1) and designing assessments of learning (Chapter 3), it behooves us now to turn to the direct means of facilitating student learning: content and assignments (learning activities). Online materials are central to a blended course’s success, and the students’ work online must be relevant to the in-class activities. Table 1. Table 2.

Reframing and Refining the Worksheet Worksheets matter! I know we hear a lot of talking points that tell us to get rid of them, but I think it's much more complicated than that. That call for "no more worksheets" comes from a place where that is all there is. By that I mean classrooms where students do nothing but worksheets. Often these worksheets are de-contextualized from relevant work, and this is where there's an opportunity to reframe and refine the traditional worksheet. There is a time and place for drill and practice or individual practice -- even in a PBL project. A recent visit to a PBL school jumpstarted my brain on this issue. Worksheets That Model a Career Tool Students consistently worked on a piece of paper shown below. As we design worksheets, let's consider making them look like the real-world work that students are doing -- or could be doing. Worksheet used at ACE Leadership Academy Credit: Andrew Miller Other Tips for Worksheets Include the Driving Question Where Students Can See It Rubric and Reflection

The Right Mix: How One Los Angeles School is Blending a Curriculum for Personalized Learning Patty Berganza is a chatty 16-year-old with a mouthful of braces, a thick mane of black hair, and a lightning fast brain. The last of these left her so bored at her previous Los Angeles high school that she racked up more than 49 unexcused absences in one year and earned a reputation as a slacker. Despite her dismal grade point average and enormous gaps in knowledge, she was continually promoted to the next grade. She never thought about college, because nobody ever talked about it. Indeed, she says of her previous high school, “I don’t think my teachers even knew my name.” In many ways, Patty represented countless students who graduate at abysmal rates but who have the capacity to do infinitely better. Where Patty once routinely slumped at the back of the classroom texting her friends about her disregard for her teachers and her courses, she now perches front and center, attentive and engaged. To understand how innovative this approach is, it is helpful to consider the status quo.

21st-Century Projects Inspire Global Citizenship Plus Creativity Reforestation plan that was researched in a New York classroom led to 999 trees planted in Cormier, Haiti. Photo credit: Naima Penniman This is the second in a special Edutopia blog series about developing 21st century skills through project-based learning. In the first post, "Yes, You Can Teach and Assess Creativity!", blogger Andrew Miller offered classroom strategies to encourage creative thinking. This post takes a look at a real-world project that has inspired students to think more creatively about their role as global citizens. When Tech Valley High School opened its doors in 2007 in Rensselaer, New York, it offered students from across the state's Capital Region a chance to experience a different kind of public education. Those components recently came together in a project that took Tech Valley students to a rural village in Haiti, where they learned firsthand what it means to be creative -- and caring -- 21st century citizens. The Backstory A Project Takes Shape

37 Blended Learning Resources You Can Use Tomorrow 37 Blended Learning Resources You Can Use Tomorrow by Dr. Justin Marquis Remixing the curriculum – compiling resources from a variety of sources such as free online texts, proprietary information from publishers, and self-created media such as podcasts – is starting to push its way into K-12 and higher education. Get ahead of the curve with these tips for remixing your own online course materials. Gathering the Ingredients Before Remixing Like any course development process, there is a good deal of research that goes into remixing the contents of a new or existing class curriculum. Consider including a small selection of remixed materials at first and expand each time you teach the class. Free Courseware Free Online Texts Video Resources Remember, as will all sources from the Internet, you will want to confirm the validity of each one that you choose to include in a class. 37 Blended Learning Resources You Can Use Tomorrow is a cross-post from onlineuniversities.com and Dr.

Re-Imagining the Comprehensive High School Students at Sammamish High School. Photo credit: Gabriel Miller Sammamish High School is a comprehensive high school that is on the cutting edge of public education. Like many schools, we serve a diverse student body, with 45% of our students receiving free and reduced lunch support. We also serve a high percentage of special education students relative to other district schools, and currently house the district-wide program for beginning and intermediate English language learners. In 2010, we applied for and received an Investing in Innovation (i3) grant from the Department of Education that allowed us to embark on an ambitious project to fundamentally shift the learning experience in our school. STEM and PBL At Sammamish, STEM literacy includes but also goes beyond STEM content. The Seven Key Elements It is important for our school to design PBL in a way that would be authentic across disciplines, grades and courses. Professional Learning Have you tried implementing PBL in your school?

Asynchronous and Synchronous E-Learning (EDUCAUSE Quarterly © 2008 Stefan Hrastinski EDUCAUSE Quarterly, vol. 31, no. 4 (October–December 2008) Asynchronous and Synchronous E-Learning A study of asynchronous and synchronous e-learning methods discovered that each supports different purposes By Stefan Hrastinski Today’s workforce is expected to be highly educated and to continually improve skills and acquire new ones by engaging in lifelong learning. For e-learning initiatives to succeed, organizations and educational institutions must understand the benefits and limitations of different e-learning techniques and methods. My work has focused on the benefits and limitations of asynchronous and synchronous e-learning and addresses questions such as when, why, and how to use these two modes of delivery. Defining Asynchronous and Synchronous E-Learning An ongoing debate addresses the usefulness of asynchronous versus synchronous e-learning. Three Types of Communication * Adapted from Haythornthwaite. Research Background Figure 1 Click image for larger view.

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