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Should I teach problem-, project-, or inquiry-based learning? SmartBlogs

Should I teach problem-, project-, or inquiry-based learning? SmartBlogs
Lately, there have been a bunch of buzzwords floating around the education world that all seem to mean the same thing. You’ve probably heard them: problem-based learning, project-based learning and inquiry-based learning. Is there a difference? How will you know which one to do in your classroom? First, let’s start with what they have in common. All of these methods place an emphasis on teaching process, not just content. So you know you want to try one of these teaching methods, but how do you decide which one? Project-based learning Definition: Students create a written, oral, visual or multimedia project with an authentic audience and purpose. Problem-based learning Definition: Students investigate and solve a real-world problem. Inquiry-based learning Definition: Students explore a question in-depth and ask further questions to gather knowledge. How are you doing these types of learning experiences in your classroom? Lauren Davis is a former English teacher. Related Posts

http://smartblogs.com/education/2013/02/14/should-i-teach-problem-project-or-inquiry-based-learning/

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How Are We Preparing Students to Be Tomorrow's Innovators?  Follow the discussion on Empowering Education Leaders to Innovate on Wednesday Jan. 30 at 3pm PST. According to the just-released Gallup-HOPE index for 2012, developing a world-changing invention is an aspiration shared by 42 percent of youth in grades 5-12. That's good news. Given the scale of challenges facing us--in our own backyards and around the globe--it's easy to see that we're going to need every good idea the next generation has to offer.

Students Tell All: What It’s Like to Be Trusted Partners in Learning Science Leadership Academy students (Bailey Collins) Inquiry-based learning is not a new pedagogy, but it has come back into fashion in progressive education circles recently because of new emphasis on the power of students’ innate curiosity to drive learning. Inquiry-based learning asks students to discover knowledge on their own with guidance from their teachers. Rather than receiving information up front through lectures, students research guiding questions, ask their own follow-ups and get help along the way. Teaching Questioning Skills to Arm Students for Learning - Work in Progress In the earliest part of my career, I wrote full procedural lesson plans that spelled out to the letter the questions I would ask AND the answers I considered correct. When the students didn't provide the proscribed answer, I asked helper questions until I elicited the appropriate response. Man, did I have it wrong! This is the battle we fight. It demands our full attention. And if we are going to go to battle, we should appropriately arm our learners.

For Students, Why the Question is More Important Than the Answer Thinkstock In a traditional classroom, the teacher is the center of attention, the owner of knowledge and information. Teachers often ask questions of their students to gauge comprehension, but it’s a passive model that relies on students to absorb information they need to reproduce on tests.

Critical Thinking: Definitions and Assessments January 3, 2013 By: Maryellen Weimer, PhD in Educational Assessment Despite almost universal agreement that critical thinking needs to be taught in college, now perhaps more than ever before, there is much less agreement on definitions and dimensions. “Critical thinking can include the thinker’s dispositions and orientations; a range of specific analytical, evaluative, and problem-solving skills; contextual influences; use of multiple perspectives; awareness of one’s own assumptions; capacities for metacognition; or a specific set of thinking processes or tasks.” (p. 127)

Welcome to the Virtual Crash Course in Design Thinking Welcome to the d.school’s Virtual Crash Course resource page! We know not everyone can make a trip to the d.school to experience how we teach design thinking. So, we created this online version of one of our most frequently sought after learning tools. Using the video, handouts, and facilitation tips below, we will take you step by step through the process of hosting or participating in a 90 minute design challenge. If you choose to participate, in 90 minutes you will be taken through a full design cycle by participating in The Gift-Giving Project. This is a fast-paced project where participants pair up to interview each other, identify real needs, and develop a solution to “redesign the gift-giving experience” for their partner.

Questioning Toolkit Essential Questions These are questions which touch our hearts and souls. They are central to our lives. 45 Design Thinking Resources For Educators 45 Design Thinking Resources For Educators Imagine a world where digital learning platforms help adult learners succeed through college completion; where a network of schools offers international-quality education, affordable tuition, and serves hundreds of thousands of children in economically disadvantaged countries; where we engage parents in understanding national trends and topics in education; where a comprehensive learning environment seamlessly connects the classroom with the opportunities of the digital world for young students; and where system-level solutions help more students gain access to college. Educators across the world have been using design thinking to create such a world. Design thinking consists of four key elements: Defining the Problem, Creating and Considering Multiple Options, Refining Selected Directions, and Executing the Best Plan of Action.

The Inquiry Page Based on John Dewey's philosophy that education begins with the curiosity of the learner, we use a spiral path of inquiry: asking questions, investigating solutions, creating new knowledge as we gather information, discussing our discoveries and experiences, and reflecting on our new-found knowledge. Each step in this process naturally leads to the next: inspiring new questions, investigations, and opportunities for authentic "teachable moments." Design Schools: Please Start Teaching Design Again It’s that time of year when Adaptive Path wades through stacks of design school students’ resumes, looking for summer interns and potential hires. As I was doing this, a trend that that I had suspected became clear to me: quite a few design schools no longer teach design. Instead, they teach “design thinking” and expect that that will be enough. Frankly, it isn’t. I was taught that design has three components: thinking, making, and doing. (Doing is the synthesis, presentation, and evaluation of a design; the bridge between thinking and making.)

What Does Inquiry Look Like in Kindergarten? The children were engaged in the inquiry process while observing the properties of water. As they worked at learning centres the teacher invited interested children to come and discuss what they know about water and its colour. The children made comments which reflected their emerging understanding of the properties of water. These comments then acted as the basis for which to lead the investigation. The children were then prompted to wonder whether the water is the same colour as the white carnation flower.

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