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What is Web 3.0? Semantic Web & other Web 3.0 Concepts Explained in Plain English

Web 3.0 will be about semantic web, personalization (e.g. iGoogle), intelligent search and behavioral advertising among other things. This slide neatly sums up the main differences between Web 1.0, Web 2.0 and Web 3.0. Web 1.0 – That Geocities & Hotmail era was all about read-only content and static HTML websites. People preferred navigating the web through link directories of Yahoo! and dmoz. Web 2.0 – This is about user-generated content and the read-write web. Web 3.0 – This will be about semantic web (or the meaning of data), personalization (e.g. iGoogle), intelligent search and behavioral advertising among other things. If that sounds confusing, check out some of these excellent presentations that help you understand Web 3.0 in simple English.

http://www.labnol.org/internet/web-3-concepts-explained/8908/

Related:  web 2, 3 & SMWeb 2.0 +

Semantic Web I have an idea that I think is very important but I haven’t yet polished to the point where I’m comfortable sharing it. I’m going to share it anyway, unpolished, because I think it’s that useful. So here I am, handing you a dull, gray stone, and I’m saying there’s a diamond inside. Maybe even a dilithium crystal.

Semantic Web The Semantic Web is an extension of the Web through standards by the World Wide Web Consortium (W3C).[1] The standards promote common data formats and exchange protocols on the Web, most fundamentally the Resource Description Framework (RDF). According to the W3C, "The Semantic Web provides a common framework that allows data to be shared and reused across application, enterprise, and community boundaries".[2] The term was coined by Tim Berners-Lee for a web of data that can be processed by machines.[3] While its critics have questioned its feasibility, proponents argue that applications in industry, biology and human sciences research have already proven the validity of the original concept.[4] Example[edit]

What to expect from Web 3.0 Any veteran of the software industry will tell you that version 2.0 of any product tends to be a shortlived staging post on the way to 3.0, which is where it finally hits the mark. Windows was a classic example. 1.0 was so buggy it was hardly worth using. 2.0 fixed some serious problems but still had a lot of shortcomings. 3.0, launched in May 1990, was an instant success, and the rest of the story, as they say, is history. Don't be surprised, then, if Web 2.0 also turns out to be just a staging post on the way to a much more mature and durable Web 3.0 is going to deliver a new generation of business applicationsWeb 3.0 era. Over the next couple of weeks I'm going to be writing a series of posts about what I see as the key characteristics of Web 3.0, using a variety of on-demand companies by way of illustration. Of course I'll be mentioning Google, Amazon.com and eBay.

What is e-Learning? What is e-Learning? E-Learning is education and training utilizing information technology, such as computers and communication networking. Of all the various types of e-Learning, the most widespread e-Learning method is the asynchronous "Web-based Training (WBT)".

New Schemas for Mapping Pedagogies and Technologies', Ariadne Issue 56 Printer-friendly version Send to friend Grainne Conole reflects on the implications of Web 2.0 for education and offers two new schemas for thinking about harnessing the potential of technologies.

Basic Definitions: Web 1.0, Web. 2.0, Web 3.0 “What do people mean when they talk about the Web 2.0?” is a query we receive repeatedly, and probably has as many answers as the number of people out there using the term. However, since talk about the Web 3.0 has surfaced in the last year or so, a whole new level of confusion seems to have set in. In an effort to help people understand the ideas behind buzzwords like Web 2.0 and Web 3.0, let’s go through what exactly these terms mean (if anything), and how they apply to your ecommerce business. A broad definition I want to make it clear at the start that this article is meant to be a broad definition of the challenges that cause people to think in terms of Web 2.0 and Web 3.0.

The Semantic Web Acid Test Tom Heath writes a cracking post on the current attempts by a few people to brand web applications that happen to perform text analysis as “Semantic Web”. For me, this nails it: I certainly notice plenty of unjustified attempts at present to co-opt the term Semantic Web, now that it’s no longer a dirty word, and drive it off down some dodgy alleyway.

Jan05_01 Editor’s Note: This is a milestone article that deserves careful study. Connectivism should not be con fused with constructivism. George Siemens advances a theory of learning that is consistent with the needs of the twenty first century. His theory takes into account trends in learning, the use of technology and networks, and the diminishing half-life of knowledge. Web 3.0 - definition of Web 3.0, the Semantic Web, BuzzWord from Macmillan Dictionary. noun[uncountable] a third phase in the evolution of the World Wide Web, based on the idea that the Internet 'understands' the pieces of information it stores and is able to make logical connections between them 'With Web 3.0, it's about the Web becoming smarter, getting to know you better from your browsing history (and all you've contributed to it during Web 2.0) and automatically delivering content to you that is relevant.' Bizcommunity.com 13th May 2010 From its inception in the early 1990s through to the foreseeable future, the World Wide Web is a developing phenomenon, constantly evolving in response to new technologies and the changing expectations of users.

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