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7 Qualities of Uber-Productive People

7 Qualities of Uber-Productive People
Some people get more done than others--a lot more. Sure, they work hard. And they work smart. But they possess other qualities that make a major impact on their performance. They do the work in spite of disapproval or ridicule. Work too hard, strive too hard, appear to be too ambitious, try to stand out from the crowd. Pleasing the (average-performing) crowd is something remarkably productive people don't worry about. They hear the criticism, they take the potshots, they endure the laughter or derision or even hostility--and they keep on measuring themselves and their efforts by their own standards. And, in the process, they achieve what they want to achieve. They see fear the same way other people view lunch. One of my clients is an outstanding--and outstandingly successful--comic. Yet he still has panic attacks before he walks onstage. He's still scared. Anyone hoping to achieve great things gets nervous. They can still do their best on their worst day. Most people wait for an idea.

Start Every Day as a Producer, Not a Consumer I have to agree that my most productive days are those where I don't allow myself to read the news, check e-mail, facebook, etc., right after I get up. However, that happens because I've got a ton of stuff to get done, and the outside world takes a back seat until my workload is under control. However, there are certain biological necessities that have to happen before I can be productive. The dog gets let out, I go to the bathroom, I eat/drink something, and *then* I sit down to be productive. I also *have* to check my e-mail, because if something blew up overnight or there's something that needs to be dealt with ASAP, I need to know as early as possible. Flagged

MacGyver Favorites of 2012: On being wrong about business talks Business talks are boring. Among all the things I was certain of when I started writing for TED, that one was near the top of the list, just under ‘ice is cold’ and ‘brains are gooey.’ I worked as a physicist for a few years before switching over to writing (with a short jaunt in between in comedy), so just never cared much for business. My time as a scientist was spent doing research, talking to people about research, lecturing about research, annoying family members by going on and on about research and, very occasionally, sleeping. At TED, I was hired to write about the science talks, and it was wonderful. As I watched more talks, though, one theme started to emerge that I fell in love with — the idea of being wrong. I loved Rowe’s talk, partly because it’s a riveting story, but also because the feeling of being wrong –which he describes perfectly – is so central to science. And then, at TEDGlobal this year, I saw the talk at the top of this post, by Margaret Heffernan.

How To be so Productive You Can't Stand it You might think that creatives as diverse as Internet entrepreneur Jack Dorsey, industrial design firm Studio 7.5, and bestselling Japanese novelist Haruki Murakami would have little in common. In fact, the tenets that guide how they – and exceptionally productive creatives across the board – make ideas happen are incredibly similar. Here are 10 laws of productivity we’ve consistently observed among serial idea executors: 1. A bias toward action is the most common trait we’ve found across the hundreds of creative professionals and entrepreneurs we’ve interviewed. 2. When our ideas are still in our head, we tend to think big, blue sky concepts. 3. Trial and error is an essential part of any creative’s life. To avoid ‘blue sky paralysis,’ pare your idea down to a small, immediately executable concept. 4. When working on in-depth projects, we generate lots of new ideas along the way. 5. 6. Part of being able to work on your project a little bit each day is carving out the time to do so. 7.

10 theories that explain why we dream Kinja is in read-only mode. We are working to restore service. I like #7 and #8 of sorts, as they sort of fit in with the kinds of dreams I have. Fixing things, solving thing, experimenting with situations, and learning. That said, I know that differs a lot from the kind of dreams I probably had as a child, so there really can't be a single answer to this I guess. On that note after seeing Inception I loved the comments about how our dreams are basically "filled in" with familiar places/things to make them feel more complete. Flagged

The #1 Career Mistake Capable People Make Here’s How The World’s Most Brilliant Minds Scheduled Their Days Sources: RJ Andrews Infowetrust.com Mason Currey’s Daily Rituals: 69 Awesome Brain Hacks That Give You Mind-Blowing Powers #56. You Can Reset Your Sleep Cycle With a Hunger Strike Chances are, when summer vacation or the holidays come around and you're given time off work or school, your sleeping patterns falter a little bit ("a little bit" is a phrase that here means "you play video games until the 'a.m.' and 'p.m.' dot on your alarm clock has completely lost its meaning"). How? Simple! Don't forget to compensate for the hunger madness. You might know that the main way our body regulates its biological clock (and circadian rhythm) is through light. The food-clock desires this. Imagine you're a predator out hunting for food (and Jesse Ventura), but all the regular animals you would eat are nowhere to be found. The slaying of pizza rolls has set countless new biological mornings. It makes sense -- your brain is now under the impression that if you want to survive, you can only go hunting at night. #55. #54. You already know that the answer is yes. Let's say you're an eyewitness to a bank heist. #53. #52. #51.

Daily Rituals: A Guided Tour of Writers’ and Artists’ Creative Habits by Maria Popova Hemingway wrote standing, Nabokov on index cards, Twain while puffing cigars, and Sitwell in an open coffin. “We are spinning our own fates, good or evil, and never to be undone,” the William James’s famous words on habit echo. “Every smallest stroke of virtue or of vice leaves its never so little scar.” Given this omnibus of the daily routines of famous writers was not only one of my favorite articles to research but also the most-read and -shared one in the entire history of Brain Pickings, imagine my delight at the release of Daily Rituals: How Artists Work (public library) by Mason Currey, based on his blog of the same title. The notion that if only we could replicate the routines of great minds, we’d be able to reverse-engineer their genius is, of course, an absurd one — yet an alluring one nonetheless. Mark Twain — master of epistolary snark, unsuspected poet, cheeky adviser of little girls — followed a simple but rigorous routine: Photograph courtesy BBC

Stop Procrastinating by "Clearing to Neutral" By Thanh Pham We often procrastinate because there is this one hidden thing holding us back. It is this one thing that makes you procrastinate and most people are not even aware what this is, but if you eliminate it you can say goodbye to procrastination forever. Friction A lot of times we procrastinate because we have to jump through a lot of hurdles before we can do the thing we actually want to do. To put it in other words, before you can do your main activity (cooking), you have to all these others things (cleaning) before you can get to your main activity. If you make it hard for yourself to get started, that’s when you will most likely procrastinate. Now imagine you actually cleaned your desk and now you need to do some work on your computer. All these little starting points where you have friction are very common. Now this is where, as we at Asian Efficiency like to call it, the habit of Clearing To Neutral (CTN) comes in. More Examples Next Steps

James Clear: How to Stop Procrastinating by Using the 'Two-Minute Rule' Recently, I've been following a simple rule that is helping me crush procrastination and making it easier for me to stick to good habits at the same time. I want to share it with you today so that you can try it out and see how it works in your life. The best part? It's a simple strategy that couldn't be easier to use. How to Stop Procrastinating With the "Two-Minute Rule" I call this little strategy the "Two-Minute Rule," and the goal is to make it easier for you to get started on the things you should be doing. Here's the deal: Most of the tasks that you procrastinate on aren't actually difficult to do -- you have the talent and skills to accomplish them -- you just avoid starting them for one reason or another. The two-minute rule overcomes procrastination and laziness by making it so easy to start taking action that you can't say no. There are two parts to the two-minute rule... Part One: If it takes less than two minutes, then do it now. The Physics of Real Life Try It Now

How the 'Seinfeld Strategy' Can Help You Stop Procrastinating Reader Resource Join Entrepreneur's The Goal Standard Challenge and make 2017 yours. Learn more » Jerry Seinfeld is one of the most successful comedians of all-time. He is regarded as one of the "Top 100 Comedians of All-Time" by Comedy Central. Seinfeld reached his peak in earnings when he made $267 million dollars in 1998. By almost any measure of wealth, popularity, and critical acclaim, Jerry Seinfeld is among the most successful comedians, writers, and actors of his generation. However, what is most impressive about Seinfeld's career isn't the awards, the earnings, or the special moments -- it's the remarkable consistency of it all. Compare his results to where you and I often find ourselves. What's the difference? I'm not sure about all of his strategies, but I recently discovered a story that revealed one of the secrets behind Seinfeld's incredible productivity, performance, and consistency. Related: Forget Setting Goals. The "Seinfeld Strategy" "After a few days you'll have a chain.

traits of the disciplined mind

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