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Éléphants empoisonnés pour l'huile de palme

Éléphants empoisonnés pour l'huile de palme
Avec sa trompe, un éléphanteau tente en vain de réanimer sa mère gisant sur le sol. C'est la scène terrible à laquelle ont assité les gardes de la réserve de Gunung Rara Forest en Malaisie. Elle et 13 autres cadavres d'éléphants d'une même horde ont été retrouvés à proximité d'un camp de bûcherons et de plantations de palmiers à huile de l'entreprise publique Yayasan Sabah Group. Laurentius Ambu, directeur du département de la vie sauvage de l'État de Sabah soupçonne les éléphants d'avoir été empoisonnés : « Les éléphants ont mangé de la mort-aux-rats. C'est la méthode employée par les travailleurs des plantations pour empêcher les animaux de manger les fruits du palmier à huile ». L'éléphant pygmée de Bornéo est une rare sous-espèce de l'éléphant d'Asie, dont il ne reste que 1.500 individus, quasi-uniquement à Sabah. La Malaisie continue de miser sur les bois tropicaux et l'huile de palme pour ses exportations. <h4>Contexte</h4> L'éléphant pygmée de Bornéo Le Yayasan Sabah Group • M.

https://www.sauvonslaforet.org/petitions/905/elephants-empoisonnes-pour-l-huile-de-palme

Related:  saynotopalmoilHUILE de PALME

VIDEO: Say no to dirty palm oil Palm oil is a staple food for millions of people worldwide, and it is an ingredient or component of 50% of packaged consumer products, from chocolate, to biodiesel, to shampoo. As a commodity, its ubiquity, high yield, and versatility of uses make it virtually irreplaceable. In the US alone, imports of palm oil have increased by a factor of five in the last decade. However, some producers have sought to exploit the versatility and growing popularity of palm oil to make a quick buck. They have cleared ancient forestland in vulnerable places, putting the lives of its human and animal inhabitants at risk. And they have done it to disastrous results.

No, This Isn't An Alien Contrary to speculation, a strange-looking animal crawling through the wreckage of a palm plantation is not from another planet. Instead, it is an indication of the tragic status of the one we're on. The video features a sun bear, which when healthy looks like this: Credit: Cuson via Shutterstock. What a healthy sun bear looks like. Exactly why the creature in the video looks more like Gollum is not yet known.

Controversial News, Controversial Current Events Author: Lou A, March 31, 2013. English: Palm oil from Ghana with its natural dark color visible, 2 litres Español: Aceite de palma de Ghana con su color oscuro natural, 2 litros (Photo credit: Wikipedia) [Note: images in this article are disturbing] Are you guilty? I’m definitely an animal lover, but not an extreme animal activist: I am not vegan, nor vegetarian (aside from a brief dalliance as a child after watching ‘Babe’, proudly, for around a year and a half) as I love meat too much (and yes, I confess I was broken by a BigMac….), and I wear leather (perhaps naively assuming this is a by product of the red meat I’m eating), but I AM in favour of sustainable and cruelty free products. I do not support the fur trade, which I think is a diabolical excuse for fashion, nor do I buy eggs that are from battery hens.

No, This Isn't An Alien Contrary to speculation, a strange-looking animal crawling through the wreckage of a palm plantation is not from another planet. Instead, it is an indication of the tragic status of the one we're on. The video features a sun bear, which when healthy looks like this: Credit: Cuson via Shutterstock. What a healthy sun bear looks like. Exactly why the creature in the video looks more like Gollum is not yet known.

'Palmed Off': Is Your Dinner Killing Orangutans? When I found Max, he couldn’t walk. He was disorientated and terrified, and the burns to his feet and body were severe. He was one of several hundred orangutans displaced by forest clearing outside Indonesia’s Tanjung Puting National Park in 2006. He had become separated from his family after plantation workers cruelly herded escaping orangutans back to the burning jungle—and away from precious plantation land. No more than one year old, Max had fought successfully against the trapping, hunting and forest clearing industries that endangered his short life. But with one last breath, he finally lost his battle, becoming one of several thousand orangutans killed annually by a barbaric agricultural farming process, and becoming a victim of a different kind of oil spill: the trade in palm oil.

The Tragic Truth Behind 'Alien-Like Creature' Caught On Film Malaysian social media was abuzz over the weekend after footage emerged of a "strange" creature crawling through the ruined forests of a palm oil plantation, leading to speculation that it was alien in origin. Experts, however, say that this isn't an exciting otherworldly discovery — but rather a sad testament to how life on this planet is treated. (YouTube/The Borneo Post SEEDS) As the Borneo Post reports, plantation workers were shocked to encounter a clawed, hairless animal while working in palm fields near the village of Sibu.

Palm Oil’s Dirty Secret: The Many Ingredient Names For Palm Oil Click to view full-size infographic Did you see the palm oil infographic we released today? I hope so! If you haven’t seen it yet, check it out. Were you shocked to find out that palm oil is in half of the products in your pantry? Palm Oil - Orangutan Foundation International Australia What is Palm Oil? Palm Oil comes from the Elaeis Guineensis plant which originated in West Africa and grows abundantly in hot, wet climates. It is the most widely produced oil in the world (eclipsing soybean oil) with around 90% of all palm oil, coming from Indonesia and Malaysia. Palm Oil is a high yielding crop which takes between 3-4 years to mature and produce fruit. The palm fruit itself, develops in bunches which can grow in excess of 10 kilograms, and contain hundreds of individual fruits about the size of a small plum or apricot. When the fruit is harvested, palm oil is extracted from the flesh of the fruit and palm kernel oil is produced by squeezing the oil from the internal seed.

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