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Mental_floss Blog » Extreme Home Engineering: How To Build Your Own TiVo

This week: How to build your own TiVo (or, How to never miss an important football game ever again.) Building your own TiVo—or FreeVo, as some call it—is more than a dream. It's more than a trend. It's the new cool way to stick it to The (TiVo) Man while impressing your friends. Make and Wired have published detailed how-tos. There are also several online communities like The Green Button that will help guide you through the tricky parts. For the technology dunces of the world—myself included—I had several friends break down the jargon into simple steps we can all understand. Your mission: To build your own digital video recorder from mail-order parts. The payoff: An integrated entertainment system that records TV programs with no monthly fees. Keep reading for your marching orders... Ingredients 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. "You have to consider WAF (wife acceptance factor -- or HAF if it's the wife doing the installation). Steps 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7.

Watch all your favorite tv shows and movies on The Nerd Handbook A nerd needs a project because a nerd builds stuff. All the time. Those lulls in the conversation over dinner? It’s unlikely that this project is a nerd’s day job because his opinion regarding his job is, “Been there, done that”. At some point, you, the nerd’s companion, were the project. Regarding gender: for this piece, my prototypical nerd is a he as a convenience. Understand your nerd’s relation to the computer. First, a majority of the folks on the planet either have no idea how a computer works or they look at it and think “it’s magic”. The nerd has based his career, maybe his life, on the computer, and as we’ll see, this intimate relationship has altered his view of the world. Your nerd has control issues. The reason for this typeface selection is, of course, practicality. These control issues mean your nerd is sensitive to drastic changes in his environment. Your nerd has built himself a cave. Each object in the Cave has a particular place and purpose. Nerds are fucking funny.

“The Cosby Show” Had the Best Music of Any Sitcom Ever Amazon Times New Roman;">The Huxtables loved jazz, rhythm and blues, classical, Latin funk and hip-hop. Cliff was a jazzhead. Clair sang along with Stevie Wonder. From the very ‘80s original theme to the fifth season’s symphonic sound to the beboppy final season, what more of an appropriate curtain raiser to the 25th anniversary of The Cosby Show (NBC, 1984-1992) than a recap of the sounds—and moves—of the Cosbys. “Kiss Me,” composed by Stu Gardner (he also wrote themes for A Different World and Living Single) and Bill Cosby, was remixed throughout the show’s eight-year run. Here starts the real fun. The cast cha-cha-cha’d to this Latin jazz/funk opener. Bobby McFerrin, of “Don’t Worry, Be Happy” fame, scats through this jazzy season opener. The season five sequence is the stand out. And you can’t forget the moves. This opener features saxophonist Craig Handy, and the famed Apollo Theatre marquee. For the last season Lester Bowie sounds off on his trumpet.

Grace Hopper Explains Nanoseconds to Letterman Rear Admiral Grace Hopper is famous both as a computer pioneer and for, at the time of her retirement (at age 79), being the nation's oldest active military officer. Hopper worked on early computers, and is widely credited with popularizing the term "computer bug" after she found a moth stuck inside a relay in Harvard's Mark II computer in 1947. (Thus "debugging" became the term for fixing computer problems....) You can see the first computer bug (they kept the moth!) at the Smithsonian, in the American History museum. In this 1986 interview with David Letterman, Grace Hopper displays her grace and wit, and explains the concept of a nanosecond, using Bell System telephone wire cut into 30cm lengths -- 30cm is the maximum distance light can travel in a billionth of a second. "When an admiral asks you why it takes so damn long to send a message via satellite, you point out to him that between here and the satellite there are a very large number of nanoseconds. (Via Waxy.)

David Suchet is saying goodbye to Poirot Waterloo Region Record GALMPTON, England — The final push to the top of his personal Everest consisted of about 50 dainty steps, in the precise and idiosyncratic gait he has perfected over 25 years. David Suchet paced up to the door of the house, glanced around, gave a tip of his hat and the ghost of a smile, and disappeared inside. When the cameras stopped rolling, he emerged and raised his arms in triumph as a crew member called a wrap on one of the most remarkable achievements in recent British television history. It was the last day of filming — ever — for Suchet as Agatha Christie's famous detective Hercule Poirot, a character he first played in 1988 and that has become the defining role of his career. No one could've guessed then that the series would span a quarter-century or that the classically trained Suchet would complete the entire catalogue of whodunits featuring the eccentric Belgian investigator, including 33 novels and dozens of short stories. Los Angeles Times

NOVA Can Wind Turbines Make You Sick? Residents living in the shadows of wind turbines say the sound is making them sick. But so far the science isn't there. From NOVA Next | Jun 27, 2018 Thirty Years Ago Today, Global Warming First Made Headline News On June 23, a NASA climate scientist, James Hansen, told a U.S. From NOVA Next | Jun 23, 2018 New Middle Eastern Particle Accelerator’s Motto is “Science for Peace” In a region in turmoil, an unprecedented joint venture of scientists and policymakers is working together on Jordan’s new particle accelerator under the motto "science for peace." From NOVA Next | Jun 21, 2018 Psychological Damage Inflicted By Parent-Child Separation is Deep, Long-Lasting Here's what happens in the brain and the body when a child is forcibly separated from his or her parents.

Crime In Mind Sitcoms Online - Sitcom news, message boards, photos, links, theme songs, and more! We Got The Solution! A Flashpoint Blog Two Cathedrals - West Wing Wiki - NBC, Martin Sheen, Allison Janney "Previously on the West Wing" spoken by Josh President Bartlet hardly seems to care about the important issues he is confronting through a day that consists of Mrs. Landingham's funeral in the morning and telling the American public about his MS that evening. Word of his condition has already leaked (both intentionally and unintentionally), so there is no backing out. As the hour of the press conference approaches, the staff anxiously awaits the President's decision regarding a second term. The President tells the staff he will not seek a second term. Bartlet goes to the press conference in the middle of the storm. Summary Edit Opening Edit Two members of Congress are in Leo's office, upset at only just finding out about the President's illness. Act I Toby is frantically preparing for the interview with the President and the First Lady with Sam - "the show must go on." Leo and the President are in the Situation Room with staff discussing Haiti. Act II Act III Act IV Quotes C.J. Trivia / Goofs

Bart's Blackboard

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