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Flipping the Classroom

Flipping the Classroom
4/27/2012 By: Teachers from around the world have adopted the flipped classroom model and are using it to teach a variety of courses to students of all ages. In the excerpt below from the book, Flip Your Classroom (©2012, ISTE® International Society for Technology in Education and ASCD), authors Jonathan Bergmann and Aaron Sams outline reasons why educators should consider this model. Flipping speaks the language of today’s students. Today’s students grew up with Internet access, YouTube, Facebook, MySpace, and a host of other digital resources. Instruction via video is not a big deal for [them]. Flipping helps busy students. Flipping helps struggling students. Flipping helps students of all abilities to excel. Flipping allows students to pause and rewind their teacher. Flipping increases student–teacher interaction. Flipping changes classroom management. Flipping educates parents. Flipping makes your class transparent. Flipping is a great technique for absent teachers. By Lisa Nielsen

http://www.techlearning.com/features/0039/flipping-the-classroom/52462

Related:  Getting started with the flipped classroom

The flipped classroom Flip or reverse teaching is an instructional approach that uses the power of technologies to support focused and extended student learning. In the approach developed by American teacher, Karl Fish, teachers 'teach' at night and students do 'homework' during the day.1 In the evening, flip teaching involves students in reading, watching, pausing and replaying video tutorials prepared by the teacher to develop a basic understanding of key learning concepts. They then come to class where they can consolidate, apply and extend their new learning through group discussion, problem solving or experimenting with the concepts they have been introduced to. Essentially, what was traditionally completed at home as homework has been flipped to become the focus of classroom learning. Using this strategy allows classroom instructional time to be focused and targeted to students' needs and prior knowledge.

To Flip Or Not Flip? To flip or not to flip? That is not the essential question. In assessing the optimal classroom dynamics, I would argue that we need to take a good look at what our classrooms look like right now, what activities our students gain the most from, what we wished we had more time for, and what things about our class we wish we could eliminate. Do I flip: yes. Would I recommend it: enthusiastically.

Flipped Classroom - Savage Science Who Said Lecture is Dead? Flipping the Traditional Classroom Model By Craig Savage I’ll let you in on a little secret: Teachers love to lecture. Okay, that’s probably not such a big secret. Just listen to one of my students: “Savage loves to hear himself talk. How A Flipped Classroom Actually Works [Interview] What happens when the students have more control in the classroom? Flipped classrooms are being tested out around the world and we’ve featured a few examples in case you wanted to see who is flippin’ out. Until now, we didn’t have an in-depth look at the effects of a flipped classroom or answers to the big questions it raises.

50 Awesome Ways to Use Skype in the Classroom Written By: Jillian Terry Skype is a free and easy way for teachers to open up their classroom and their students to a world way beyond their campus. With Skype, students can learn from other students, connect with other cultures, and expand their knowledge in amazing ways. Teachers and parents can also benefit from Skype in the classroom.

How the Flipped Classroom Is Radically Transforming Learning Editor's Note:Posts about the flipped class on The Daily Riff beginning in January 2011 have generated over 240,000 views to-date - thanks contributors and readers . . . See our other links related to the flipped class below this guest post. Since this post was written, Bergmann and Sams have released their book, Flip your Classroom: Reach Every Student in Every Class Every Day. Do check it out. - C.J. 8 Observations on flipping the classroom One of the more unfortunate buzzwords to appear in online education circles and the press is “flipping the classroom”. This means that instead of lecturing students in lessons in school, the teacher records the lecture as a video and uploads it to YouTube – or recommends other people’s videos to the students. The students watch the videos for homework, freeing up the lesson for interactivity, project work and so on. Would you REALLY want to watch this every night?!I not impressed with this brilliant “new” idea. Why not?

Flip Your Classroom - Get Your Students to Do the Work Recently I shared lunch with colleague and friend, Mike Gwaltney. He teaches in a variety of blending settings both in class and online. We got into an interesting discussion about ways to deliver instructional content and learning process both in and outside the classroom. The conversation quickly turned to the notion of "flipping the classroom." This is the idea that teachers shoot videos of their lessons, then make them available online for students to view at home.

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