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A string quilt block tutorial – paper pieced method

A string quilt block tutorial – paper pieced method
I’m so blown away by all the wonderful comments on my string quilt, now aptly named ‘Kaleidoscope’ (many thanks to Kerri who was the first to suggest it, followed by 9 others of you who had the same thought!) I think it’s just perfect. And now, a quick tutorial – I had a few requests for a tutorial on making this type of quilt, so I figured I’d oblige (it’s the least I can do, right?). To start, you’ll want to decide on the size of your blocks. Cut squares of your desired size from the copy paper and set aside. Decide on your fabrics and cut strips of a variety of widths. I wanted to have a small strip of white separate the squares in my quilt, so I cut 1″ strips of a solid white fabric. Next we’ll temporarily attach the white strips to the paper squares. Now you can start sewing on your fabric strips! (please ignore my wrinkly fabric! Align the edges and sew with a 1/4″ seam allowance. Sew along this edge (right through the paper), then iron open with a dry iron. Related:  Tutorialspatterns and projectsSewing

Binding Tutorial I receive many queries regarding quilt binding, specifically machine stitching the binding, and would like to clarify a few technical, but not difficult, binding matters. I almost always make continuous cross-grain binding, There are several very informative tutorials available online which are clear and easy to follow. I particularly like the instructions given by Amanda from Crazy Mom Quilts in her quilt binding tutorial which can be found here. I do have a few of my own tips, things that work well for me: To determine the length of continuous binding needed I measure the quilt top and side, multiply by two, and add at least 25 inches. I cut my binding strips 2.25 inches wide, quite narrow as I prefer the look of a narrow binding. I join the binding strips with a diagonal seam as follows: Joining binding strips end to end . By piecing strips together with a diagonal seam you avoid having too much bulk in the one spot along your binding. I join the ends together with a diagonal seam:

Longarm Quilting: Tips for Choosing & Creating A Quilt Design Picking the design you want when creating a quilt is not always simple. In this longarm series, we’ve learned how to prepare a quilt for longarm quilting and a glimpse behind the scene at how a quilt is loaded onto a longarm. Today, I’m going to simplify the process of both choosing and creating a quilt design perfect for your quilt top. Consider these questions to help you decide. There are a few simple questions to ask yourself before deciding on a quilting pattern or design for your quilt top. 1. Pantograph quilts High school and college graduation is right around the corner and longarmers are busy quilting your gifts of love. When choosing the right pantograph for your quilt top, take design hints from your fabric. Photo via Lisa Calle This raindrop pantograph by Lisa Calle would be perfect on a quilt with umbrellas! Pantographs can also be chosen to add texture to your quilt. Get the Lattice Stars Quilt Pattern here. Custom quilts Thread choice for custom quilting is important.

Quilt Dad: orbc quilt-along Thank you all so much for the wonderful feedback you've been leaving me on my last tutorial. I am so glad to hear that I've been able to help so many new quilters (and even some older, but new-to-wonky quilters!) get started on this new project. I've even heard from some of the more experienced quilters that I was able to offer a few new tips, which is great. It's been so much fun seeing all of the blocks you've been creating, and I really hope you're enjoying yourself in the process. Before moving on to today's tutorial, I wanted to take care of a few pieces of business. There are, however, two points of clarification that I want to call out here. You can also begin to introduce pieced strips to make longer usable strips out of too-short ones, a technique I'll be introducing in this post. Second, I also want to comment on fabric requirements for the quilt along. Finally, I made the block from the first tutorial into an adorable little quilted pillow for my giveaway winner. ... and trim.

How to Recycle Yarn from a Thrift-Store Sweater October 4th, 2008 Email 62 users recommend When you're done ripping, you'll have hundreds of yards of brand-new yarn for knitting! Lee Meredith This example sweater is bulky yarn, so it'll be easier to see what's going on. Sometimes the edge will be machine sewn closed, so you'll have to make more cuts to get it started. Photo: Lee Meredith The most classic handmade holiday gift has to be the knit sweater, which is also one of the most ambitious. You'll Need: Thrifted sweater to unravel (details below)Seam ripperScissors (embroidery scissors can be helpful)Dish soap or shampooThese will help if you have them: niddy noddy, swift, ball winder Your first step is to find a sweater (or two) to unravel. Yardage: If you find a fantastic yarn but are not sure it'll be enough to complete your gift, I'd recommend finding another yarn of the same weight that could be added as a stripe in your sweater if needed. Seams: To get usable yarn, your sweater must have sewn or crocheted seams, not serged!

Fabric Storage Box – Free Tutorial | PatternPile.com by Tina Craig + MIssouri Star Quilts I hope you enjoy this little fabric box tutorial. I thought it would be something we could make for teachers to put on their desks or for daycare, etc. A million uses come to mind which makes this tutorial and sewing project incredibly useful – practical. This handy storage box is simple enough to sew up in about an hour, which makes it perfect for a last minute hostess gift too. Beginner Free Motion Quilting (Machine Quilting) by MissouriQuiltCo Bagmaking Techniques: Completed Bags @ Sew-Whats-New.com: Find more inspiring sewing photos like this on sew-whats-new.com I Dance in Circles Making this quilt felt a little bit like dancing. It is full of color and movement, and just the right touch of sexy. But don't be scared of all those curves; I assure you -- not a single pin or template was used in their construction. In case you don't remember me, I'm Tracey; I blog at traceyjay quilts. 1 Fandango Layer Cake 4 yards backing 1/2 yard binding At least four - 5/8 yd. pieces of coordinating Basic Grey Grunge solids Featured: Grunge Basics Poplin 30150 20 Grunge Basics White 30150 58 Grunge Basics Sateen 30150 18 Grunge Basics Sweetie 30150 72 Grunge Winter Mint 30150 85 Grunge Basics Chiffon 30150 15 Grunge Basics Rum Raisin 30150 13 Grunge Basics Blue 30150 60 (You need at least twenty-eight 10" squares - you can get four squares from one 10" x WOF strip) Though not necessary, an 8 1/2 inch square ruler comes in handy for this quilt. Cutting: Cut at least seven 10" x WOF strips from your Grunge solids. Sew your first seam together on all three pieces of your set.

Baby Lattice Quilt Hi, I’m Amy Smart and I like to share my quilting adventures at my blog Diary of a Quilter. I’m excited to share a tutorial for a sweet little baby quilt using a couple of Charm Packs and a contrasting sashing fabric. 2 Charm Packs (or 1 Charm Pack + a Fat Quarter) 1 yard sashing fabric (corrected) 1½ yards backing fabric 3/8 yard binding Collect (50) 5″ squares from either 2 Charm Packs or a Charm Pack + (8) 5″ squares from a coordinating Fat Quarter or two. From Binding Fabric cut: (4) 2 ½” x wof (width of fabric) fabric strips (or 180″ of continuous bias binding) From Sashing Fabric cut: (2) 5″ x wof (width of fabric) strips (1) 7 ½” x wof strip (10) 1 ½” x wof strips From one of the 5″ x wof strips, cut (2) 4 1/8” squares. From remaining 5″ strips cut (40) 1½” x 5″ pieces Subcut 7½” strip into (5) 7½”squares. Assembly Start assembling rows diagonally with a side-setting triangle at the beginning and end of each row. Rows 2-9 will have a 5″ x 1½” sashing strip between the squares.

How to Quilt: Scrap Quilts How to Quilt>Scrap Quilts Bonnie Hunter is a quilter who specializes in scrap quilts using fabric from thrift shops or donations from friends' closets. Recently she visited with us for our Eavesdrop on a Telephone Conversation, and the specific topic was how to choose the garments at a thrift shop that will make great fabric for a quilt. Here is a sampling of her answers: Penny: How do you know whether a particular garment would make a good fabric for a quilt? Bonnie: I look for garments the same way I look for fabric. If it says 100% cotton, then that’s the first thing I’ll look for. The next thing I check is how the fabric feels in my hand. I look for the same kinds of things when I look for articles of clothing to cut up for fabric. Penny: You don’t use polyester? Bonnie: No, I don’t. Men’s shirts, so far, have not incorporated spandex. Penny: How do you estimate how much fabric you’ll be able to get from a particular garment? Bonnie: The size of the garment will give you an idea.

WE BUILT A SPINNING WHEEL FOR $2.50 One day Barbara—that's my best friend—and I got this crazy idea: Why not try to make a spinning wheel? Up until then, Barbara had been spinning our "homegrown" wool (which comes from a little black sheep and a white woolly that we keep here on our ten acres) on a drop spindle. In case you didn't know, a drop spindle is nothing more than a tapered dowel—weighted at the bottom—which you hold vertically and let rotate while pulling wool from the top. It's a slow-but-simple way to spin wool. Now, it takes a long time to make even a two- or three ounce skein by the drop spindle method. Not that it isn't fun . . . We thought awhile, and—after seeing diagrams and pictures of homemade wheels in Foxfire 2 —decided we couldn't wait any longer. "Look!" Our biggest piece of luck-considering we're both just unskilled novices when it comes to things mechanical—was finding a ready-made wheel. From that point, the actual construction of our spinning wheel was a cinch.

Block Patterns Articles 1 - 10 of 204 << Prev 1 | | | 8 of Our Favorite Quilt Block Patterns + 20 Top Patterns There are endless numbers of quilt block designs you can use in your quilt patterns, but sometimes it can be hard to find the real winners. "Patterns for Quilting: 8 Free Quilt Block Patterns to Make a Quilt for Your Home" eBook Every quilt has a foundation, the quilt block, which helps structure the quilt from the very beginning. Giant Dresden Plate Block Break free from the standard square quilt pattern with the Giant Dresden Plate Block. Orange Windows Quilt Block The Orange Windows Quilt Block looks similar to more complicated quilt block patterns with curved piecing, but it's actually a much easier applique block. Disappearing 16 Patch Block You've heard of a disappearing 9 patch quilt, but have you seen a Disappearing 16 Patch Block? Bejeweled Quilt Block Pattern Herringbone String Block Make a classy and quick quilt block with this pattern for a Herringbone String Block.

Summer runner I finally dusted off my sewing machine and made this summery table runner for a gift using a charm pack and a half yard of white fabric. The fabric is Treasures and Tidbits. To make this quick runner cut 160 squares 1.75" x 1.75", and pick out 40 – 5" squares or use a charm pack. Make a snowball block by sewing a white square in each corner of the 5" square. Then sew them together 4 blocks in a row & 10 rows. I got A LOT of questions about keeping my lines straight when I do straight line quilting. Scrappy Pineapple Block and Foundation Paper Piecing Pattern Last week and the weekend in stitches. After working on the very modern Floating Squares quilt last week my new project could not be any more traditional. The Pineapple Quilt Block dates back to the 1930's and the possible design variations - in size, repeat, and color placement - are endless. The making of this quilt is inspired by Connie's Teeny Tiny Pineapple Project as featured on Bonnie Hunter's blog, simply because I admire the commitment and determination it takes to piece miniature blocks. My blocks however are not so teeny tiny! My Scrappy Pineapple Blocks are 7 inches x 7 inches finished and I have chosen to foundation paper piece for accuracy. and then my EQ7 version of the quilt layout: And so the paper piecing began. I have made the foundation paper piecing pattern for this block available as a PDF file - ready to download - from my Craftsy Pattern Store. Print only page 1 of the pdf file to print multiple copies of the foundation pattern.

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