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NMC Horizon Report 2013 Higher Education Report

NMC Horizon Report 2013 Higher Education Report

http://www.nmc.org/pdf/2013-horizon-report-HE.pdf

Related:  Journals & Academic Resources on Digital EducationStrategy

Digital Media & Learning Strategy Rationale Our society is in the midst of a reinvention of how knowledge is created, organized, accessed, and shared that has far-reaching implications for institutions of learning – schools, libraries, museums, and more. Digital media offers the promise of a new learning system that acknowledges and nurtures individual talents, skills, and interests. Higher Education in 2020 What will higher education look like in 2020? A new report from the Britain-based Observatory on Borderless Higher Education draws on interviews with 21 international education professionals in an attempt to answer just that. Here are a few of its main findings: On MOOCs (massive open online courses), their impact “on pedagogy and university business models will be profound but an evolutionary shift rather than an avalanche of change.” On mobility, the demand for higher education worldwide will continue to grow, but at a lower rate than in the past 20 years.

Hybrid Pedagogy Journal The “crisis in the humanities,” whether unprecedented and dire or perpetual and overblown, plays out as a controversy over how long people like me will have a job, and whether we’ll be missed once we’re gone. But it also has subtler and more immediate effects on how we understand and talk about our own work on a daily basis, under the shadow of these dark predictions. This essay is not about the corporatization of the university or the terrible contingency of academic employment (covered from many angles here in Hybrid Pedagogy); rather, it’s about what gets left out of the conversation — or, worse, out of our teaching — when so many of us feel the roof over our heads is threatening to cave in. It’s about beauty. In fact, there are many reasons for beauty to flee the scene. “To misstate, or even merely understate, the relation of the universities to beauty is one kind of error that can be made,” Scarry writes.

College 2020: Higher Education and the Online 2.0 Institutions Abstract College in America will look very different in just a few years, thanks to remarkable innovations taking place in technology and business models in higher education. The advance of Online 2.0 will trigger structural changes in what we mean by a “college education.” Students in the future will be more likely to pursue their studies in an “unbundled” system in which different institutions provide different parts of a student’s higher education experience.

Is higher ed too preoccupied with the present to plan for the future? Dive Brief: A new book by Jon McGee, vice president for planning and public affairs at the College of Saint Benedict and Saint John’s University in Minnesota, says higher education leaders need to step back from the demands of the present to plan for the future. University Business reports "Breakpoint: The Changing Marketplace for Higher Education" lays out three areas of change — demographic, economic and cultural — that will fundamentally shift the way colleges and universities have to operate to remain competitive. The demographic changes can be obvious years in advance by tracking the younger generation, and while the timing of a recession is hard to predict, the economy is cyclical, giving higher ed leaders clues that can help institutions prepare.

IBM reveals its top five innovation predictions for the next five years IBM revealed its predictions for five big innovations that will change our lives within five years. The IBM “5 in 5” is the eighth year in a row that IBM has made predictions about technology, and this year’s prognostications are sure to get people talking. We discussed them with Bernie Meyerson, the vice president of innovation at IBM, and he told us that the goal of the predictions is to better marshal the company’s resources in order to make them come true. “We try to get a sense of where the world is going because that focuses where we put our efforts,” Meyerson said. “The harder part is nailing down what you want to focus on. Unless you stick your neck out and say this is where the world is going, it’s hard to you can turn around and say you will get there first.

OLC study: 90% students see online experience as good as face-to-face Dive Brief: The Online Learning Consortium says 5.8 million students are enrolled in online higher education courses, and 90% of these students say their academic experience is as good, or better than an in-person class. According to the data, students report greater levels of engagement with coursework, faculty and classmates with learning technology and support the use of adaptive analytics in helping to customize student learning experiences. Despite eight in 10 faculty members having little experience with online learning tools, data suggests 48% of learning materials will soon be digital. Dive Insight: Higher education in 2020: three key forecasts from new report "What will higher education look like in 2020?" Tackling this broad question was a departure from the usual data-led work of the Observatory on Borderless Higher Education where I am director. The short answer is that 2020 is only seven years away and, with a bit of luck, things should not get much worse. The approach of our recent Horizon Scanning report for the International Unit and Leadership Foundation for Higher Education was dictated partly by the current landscape of higher education and further shaped by judgement. Its frame of reference included transnational education (TNE), Moocs, and ongoing debates around the sustainability of recruitment and international mobility. Other contributing factors were funding, student trends, trade liberalisation and the role of international rankings.

How to increase MOOC completion rates Dive Brief: St. George's University has increased the pass rate of students in its public health massive open online course by more than 500%, and nearly 10 times the national completion rate for similar distance learning modules. The course uses flipped classroom models, peer review and industrial infusion to make lessons more engaging and enriched for students. The model follows a similar approach taken by Harvard and the University of California, Berkeley in its graduate business courses. Dive Insight: What Higher Education Will Look Like In 2020 Higher education is rapidly changing--you don’t have to even be paying much attention to see that. Universities have started streaming lectures en masse, schools like Harvard and MIT are teaming up to create content tailored for the web, startups like UniversityNow are creating reasonably priced online universities, and startups like Udacity offer online-only classes from renowned professors. None of this existed 10 years ago, and the field isn’t done changing yet. A new report from Pew Internet looks at what higher education will look like in 2020, based on survey responses from over 1,000 "Internet experts, researchers, observers and users." Below, highlights from the survey, including notable responses from those who were polled.

Study: Digital textbook codes can be as costly as traditional materials Dive Brief: The New York Times reports on the growing costs associated with digital textbooks and learning materials, specifically access codes for tests and homework assignments. A new survey of 10 colleges and universities shows the average access code, which sometimes are only found in purchased textbooks, costs $100 alone, increasing by only $26 when offered with a traditional text. The average annual amount students spend on materials has declined by $100 since 2008, to about $602. Dive Insight:

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