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Finding the right moment (and many more YouTube tricks)

Finding the right moment (and many more YouTube tricks)

YouTube Accessories If you can access it in your school, YouTube has a ton of useful educational content. Here are ten tools that can make using YouTube in your classroom a better experience for everyone. Removing Related Content and Banner Advertisements. A Cleaner YouTube is a browser extension for Chrome, Firefox, and Safari. View Pure is a simple little tool that strips way all of the distractions of related videos, comments, and promoted videos. SafeShare.tv makes it possible to view YouTube videos without displaying the related videos and associated comments. Quietube is a handy little browser extension that removes all the clutter from YouTube allowing you to view only your selected video. Tools for Cutting and Remixing YouTube VideosDisclaimer: Some of these tools might be interpreted as a violation of YouTube's terms of service. TubeChop gives you the ability to clip a section from any YouTube video and share it. Splicd is a service that lets users select and share a segment of a YouTube video.

Lesson Plans History American Government High School - USHistorySite.com quietube | Video without the distractions | Youtube, Viddler, Vimeo and more How to Make an Interactive Lesson Using Youtube We’ve been getting a lot of questions ever since our GMAT Choose Your Own Adventure video went up. Well, one question, really: How can I make one for my students? Answer: It’s easy! Youtube has a great tool called Spotlight that lets you make any video interactive. It’s really handy for lessons and quizzes. Essentially, you can ask students a question — or a series of questions — and when they answer show them a personalized video response according to how they did. Quizzes aren’t always the most exciting things in the world, so this adds a bit of adventure to the experience. Here’s how to do it. 1. In your Youtube account (they’re easy to set up if you don’t have one), take some time to check out the Spotlight tool. 2. Spotlights let you create a clickable area in any part of your video that links to another video on Youtube. For our first video, the Edit Annotation screen looked like this: 3. You can keep this pretty simple. 4. So, back to that first video we annotated. And that’s it!

101 Great Sites for Social Studies Class 1.) The Library of Congress is a great source to find historical documents, photos, art, maps, audio and video, artifacts and other items. The American Memory section organizes items based on topics, time periods and places of American history. The World Digital Library, a cooperative project with UNESCO, includes rare documents from around the world. 2.) 3.) 3.1) EDSITEment "offers a treasure trove for teachers, students, and parents searching for high-quality material on the Internet in the subject areas of literature and language arts, foreign languages, art and culture, and history and social studies."

Answers Grockit Answers is just-in-time Q&A for video lectures. In Grockit Answers, interactions happen around video lectures, and participants ask and answer questions about specific points in the lecture. Since every question is attached to a specific point in time in the video, Grockit Answers displays a question and its answers at the point in the lecture that they are most relevant. And since the things that confuse you are likely to be the same things that confuse others, you'll find that answers to your own questions pop up on the screen just as you're starting to get confused.

Interactive Video- Turn Your YouTube Video Into an Interactive Video or Ad For Free Brand your video Make it your own! Add your logo and contact info. Add email forms to your video Allow viewers to sign up for mailing lists and newsletters directly in your video player. Add clickable links and apps Combine video with clickable call-to-actions and forms. Anytime, anywhere, web mobile and social Your interactive videos will work in your Facebook page and feeds. Measure Results Viewbix provides analytics and reports that can reveal trends in views, engagement rates, actions, and conversions - so you can get the results you want!

Advanced Placement Scores, Courses & Exam Center | AP Central - APC Members Home 100 Incredibly Useful YouTube Channels for Teachers | Online College Courses YouTube has earned a reputation for featuring brain cell-slaughtering fare such as the truly abysmal Fred and playing host to the some of the most depressingly stupid comments this side of Yahoo! News. But for every participant liberally dishing out misspelled racist, sexist and homophobic talking points, there is at least one whose channel genuinely offers something provocative and educational. For teachers hoping to infuse multimedia into their classrooms, YouTube makes for an excellent starting point. Plenty of universities, nonprofits, organizations, museums and more post videos for the cause of education both in and out of schools. Multidisciplinary and General Education Physical Sciences, Mathematics and Technology Social Sciences, History and World Issues BarackObama.com: Love him or hate him, Barack Obama is still America’s president. Visual, Performing and Liberal Arts

Hiroshima after the Atomic Bomb (3 of 5) by Harbert F Austin Jr The eight islands of Japan sprang into existence through Divine Intervention. The first two gods who came into existence were Izanagi no Mikoto and Izanami no Mikoto, the Exalted Male and Exalted Female. It was their job to make the land for people to live on. They went to the bridge between heaven and earth and, using a jewel-encrusted halberd, Izanagi and Izanami churned up the sea into a frothy foam. As salty drips of water fell from the tip of the halberd the first island was formed. Its name was Onogoro. So far, so good. The next time they met, Izanagi was sure to speak first, ensuring the proper rules were followed, and this time they produced eight children, which became the islands of Japan. I'm sure you did not fail to miss the significance of this myth for the establishment of Japanese formal society. At present, Japan is the financial capital of Asia. Technically there are three thousand islands making up the Japanese archipelago. Text by Steve Smith.

5 Reasons To Use YouTube In The Classroom If you like to bring multimedia into your lessons (and who doesn’t?) then you probably use YouTube in the classroom from time to time. But there’s a lot to the mega-video site and it’s getting a bazillion hours of video uploaded every minute nowadays. So there’s no shortage of content and the Google folks have done their best to tame the mountain of videos into an easy-to-use resource. See Also: The 100 Best Video Sites For Educators But you should know how to do more with YouTube than just watch a video, comment, or search. Who knows, you might just get inspired to use YouTube even more in the classroom! Start unique and unusual discussions Through video you can keep class exciting and new. Download all your YouTube videos Create playlists to inspire long-term learning Give students the option to dig deeper into a subject by creating a playlist of videos related to that concept. Help struggling students get caught up Create custom quizzes for your YouTube videos

AP* United States History - Key Terms, Outlines, Sample Tests Are you tired of using the same old textbook, but your school budget makes it impossible to even consider a new book adoption? Are you looking to productively take advantage of the myriad of online resources? For less than the cost of one classroom textbook, you can purchase for ALL OF YOUR STUDENTS the most up to date world history book on the market. Our World's Story shares not only the most critical tales, turning points and traditions of world history, but also includes the major issues facing the world in 2013. Check out OURWORLDZSTORY.COM *AP and Advanced Placement Program are registered trademarks of the College Board, which was not involved in the production of this web site. font>

AMERICAN HISTORY - The Learning Network Blog One example of the new Science Take video series. As our regular readers know, the mission of this blog is to find New York Times content suitable for teaching and learning — then, via lesson plans, writing prompts, quizzes and more, suggest ways for teachers to use it. In the course of our daily scavenging, we naturally pay close attention to the sections and features that most people think of first when they think “New York Times”: breaking news, Op-Eds and editorials, reviews, multimedia and photojournalism, important special reports and, increasingly, video. But we also regularly search a number of other, less well-known features of the paper that reliably yield curricular gold. When we present them at workshops and conferences, however, many teachers tell us they’re hearing about them for the first time. Below, we’ve compiled our essential list, categorized by subject area. How do you use these features?

Political Cartoons Illustrating Progressivism and the Election of 1912 Background The Progressive Era, as the period in history at the turn of the 20th century has come to be known, was a time of tremendous social, economic, and political changes, and the presidential election of 1912 typified the reform spirit of the period. Beginning in the late 1800s with the challenge to the "spoils system" of machine politics, progressivism gathered momentum between 1900 and 1916, as the desire for reform permeated the minds of the American people. Reformers themselves were a diverse group, frequently with different views, but always the same general purpose-- to reform America. The more famous reform leaders of the day reflected the diversity within the various reform groups. As president from 1901 to 1908, Theodore Roosevelt believed it was his duty to define the major problems of the day and to offer solutions. Having stated in 1904 that he would serve no more than two terms, Roosevelt endorsed Senator William Howard Taft as the Republican nominee in 1908.

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