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The Daring Librarian (@GwynethJones)

The Daring Librarian (@GwynethJones)

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Young Adult Book Reviews Genre: Historical Fiction # of Pages: 293 RAC: Yes Margaretha lives on her father’s estate in Germany and knows she must choose a suitor to marry soon. When a man named Claybrook comes and begins to woo her she thinks he might be the one, but then an injured man is brought to the healer’s cottage from England. She is one of the few people around who knows English and she translates what he’s saying. Opinion: Dear Congressman, Research Shows Closing School Libraries and Cutting Certified Librarians Does Not Make Sense Last April, after I’d criticized my congressman—Jim Himes of District 4 in Connecticut—in a column, he asked if we could meet for a “deep dive” on education issues so he could understand why they have become so polarizing. His response was to ask me if there is research to justify the salary of a media specialist. My answer was a resounding “Yes!” There is ample research, and I gathered much of it myself from existing studies while also conducting my own informal online research questionnaire for school librarians and librarians.

19 Young Adult Authors To Follow On Instagram Give your Instagram stream a literary makeover with this definitive list of young adult authors whose accounts you should be following. No seriously, go follow them and thank us later. If you like your InstaGs with a side of snark, then make sure to give these authors’ pics a double tap. Sara Benincasa LibGuides: Pedagogy to Oppress? You have to be a pretty tenacious researcher to find any criticism about LibGuides, the practical and convenient tool that librarians use to create online guides to research. My search for “LibGuides and critique or criticism” taught me a great deal about how to interpret literature, while keying in “LibGuides and problems” merely returned information about the occasional scheduled downtime. It was not until I limited my search to wordpress.com and then traced a bunch of links and pingbacks that I could even start to gather a sense of the conversation round the topic. Yet, ironically, it is exactly this twisting, infuriating and (occasionally) joyful process of research that is stifled by the way that most librarians structure and organize their LibGuides. Web-based research guides have helped to bridge the gap that the growth of online resources has put between the library and its patrons. What is a LibGuide?

Fantasy novels dominated children's reading in 2013 From The Hobbit to the Hunger Games and Harry Potter, the list of books that the UK's children loved the most last year is almost entirely stuffed with fantasy novels. Early findings from the biggest annual survey of UK children's reading habits were released today, showing a marked preference for dragons, magic and dystopia over novels set in the real world. According to the What Kids Are Reading report, the most-loved books of last year were JK Rowling's tales of a magical schoolboy, Harry Potter and the Order of the Phoenix and Harry Potter and the Goblet of Fire, which came in joint first place in the list, together with Suzanne Collins's Catching Fire, the second book in the dystopian Hunger Games trilogy. The only non-fantasy title to make the list of most-loved books was John Green's The Fault in Our Stars, about a terminally-ill teenage cancer patient who falls in love.

Ending the Invisible Library To explain the utility of ­semantic search and linked data, Jeff Penka, director of channel and product development for information management solutions provider Zepheira, uses a simple exercise. Type “Chevy Chase” into Google’s search box, and in addition to a list of links, a panel appears on the right of the screen, displaying photos of the actor, a short bio, date of birth, height, full name, spouses and children, and a short list of movies and TV shows in which he has starred. Continue typing the letters “ma” into the search box, and the panel instantly changes, showing images, maps, current weather, and other basic information regarding the town of Chevy Chase, MD. The panels are powered by Google’s Knowledge Graph, a massive knowledgebase that launched in May 2012 with “more than 500 million [data] objects” drawn from sources including Freebase, Wikipedia, and the CIA World Factbook, “as well as more than 3.5 billion facts about and relationships between these different objects.

Young Adult Book Reviews Genre: Fantasy # of Pages: 298 RAC: Yes Study Ties College Success to Students' Exposure to a High School Librarian moodboard/Thinkstock Attention, educators: training high school students early in digital research, partnering them with a school librarian, and providing time to practice skills can instill a high level of confidence during college. This triple play of digital literacy education was affirmed by preliminary observations of a study underway by EBSCO Information Services, an online database provider.

Instagram Blog For more young adult book recommendations, follow @blueeyedbiblio on Instagram. You can thank Harry Potter for Emily Ables’ (@blueeyedbiblio) infectious love of literature. When the 18-year-old Ohioan first encountered the boy wizard, it was — appropriately — a magical moment. “It showed me how much stories can do,” Emily says of the J.K. Rowling series. “Stories can allow you to live somewhere else for a day. Study: Good School Libraries Affect Test Scores Columbia, SC (WLTX) - A study released Tuesday by the South Carolina Association of School Librarians shows that the more emphasis is put on school libraries--and the learning that takes place there--the better scores students receive on standardized tests. University of South Carolina Professor Dr. Karen Gavigan outlined the studies five areas of importance at a press conference Tuesday morning. "The presence of librarians and library support staff, instructional collaboration between librarians and teachers, traditional and digital collections, library expenditures, and access to computers," she explained. The study found that the schools which had these five components had better performance on the Palmetto Assessment of State Standards. One of third-grader Tavetria Amponsah's favorite things to do is to go to the library and read.

Markus Zusak Markus Zusak was born in 1975 and is the author of five books, including the international bestseller, THE BOOK THIEF, which is translated into more than 40 languages. First released in 2005, THE BOOK THIEF has spent a total of 375 weeks on the New York Times bestseller list, and still remains there eight years after it first came out. THE MESSENGER (or I AM THE MESSENGER), published in 2002, won the 2003 Australian Children’s Book Council Book of the Year Award (Older Readers) and the 2003 NSW Premier’s Literary Award (Ethel Turner Prize), as well as receiving a Printz Honour in America. It also won numerous national readers choice awards across Europe, including the highly regarded Deutscher Jugendliteratur prize in Germany. It is THE BOOK THIEF, however, that has established Markus Zusak as one of the most successful authors to come out of Australia.

Rethinking the library proves a divisive topic at many liberal arts institutions Several library directors at liberal arts institutions have lost their jobs as they clash with faculty and administrators over how much -- and how fast -- the academic library should change. None of the dismissals, resignations or retirements are identical. Some have resulted from arguments over funding; others from debates about decision-making processes or ongoing personal strife. One common trend, however, is that several of the library directors who have left their jobs in recent years have done so after long-term disputes with other groups on campus about how the academic library should change to better serve students and faculty. The disputes highlight the growing pains of institutions and their members suddenly challenged to redefine themselves after centuries of serving as gateways and gatekeepers to knowledge. “For the entire history of libraries as we know them -- 2,000 or 3,000 years -- we have lived in a world of information scarcity," said Terrence J.

Karen Blumenthal - Bootleg As a long-time journalist, Karen writes nonfiction for young people with the belief that nonfiction brings context to a complicated world. She is particularly fascinated by social change, how it happens and why. As a financial writer, she aims to write from the consumer’s and investor’s point of view, trying to answer their questions, cut through the marketing hype and arm them with useful insights that will help them make better and more-rewarding decisions. Karen’s Business Biography Karen Blumenthal has been a financial journalist for more than 25 years. Libraries and Librarians: Essential to Thriving Schools - Road Trips in Education I love libraries! I'm composing this blog post in a recently opened library in Palo Alto, and have always loved visiting libraries big and small, in schools and in some of the largest cities in the nation. And despite the competition from monuments and government buildings of great renown, The Library of Congress is my favorite site in Washington, D.C. It's not just the love of reading and books, but the nearly sacred atmosphere of libraries that draws me in. But these temples of knowledge and information are not sacred in the way of cathedrals - hushed whispers, pipe organs, candles and stained glass, prayer and genuflection.

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