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A Rocket Stove Made From a Five Gallon Metal Bucket

A Rocket Stove Made From a Five Gallon Metal Bucket
The principle behind a rocket stove is simple–rather than cooking on an open fire, you burn wood in an insulated chimney. Rocket stoves are highly efficient and easy to make. They run on twigs, so you can avoid cutting down a whole tree just to cook dinner. We’ve had a rocket stove made out of brick in our backyard for several years. Using a piece of 4″ vent pipe and a 90º elbow, I made the chimney. I traced the outline of the vent pipe on to the lid of the bucket and cut this hole out with a jig saw. Using the vent pipe as a guide again, I cut out a 4″ hole near the bottom of the bucket. I used one part clay (harvested from the yard) to six parts vermiculite as my insulation material. With the vent pipe in place, I packed the insulation into the bucket and let it dry for a few days before putting the lid on. I found a barbecue grill at Home Depot that rests on the top of the bucket to support a pot. The last step was to add the new Root Simple stencil to the back.

Making a simple Savonius wind turbine by Lance Turner There are many situations where you might need a small amount of electricity, for instance running gate openers, safety lights, water level indicators and other low-power devices. While solar would seem like the ideal solution, quite often this is not possible due to location and shading problems. Just such a situation arose when I decided to make our new gates automatic. There were just too many trees in the way for solar power to work, and I didn’t want to run power some 30 metres or so from the house, as it would have meant digging a trench for the cables, which is almost impossible in our rocky ground. Why have automatic gates anyway? Anyway, I decided to provide power to the electric gate openers from a small wind turbine. The gate opener system itself is a home-made job, using car windscreen wiper motors driving long brass threaded shafts. Too much turbulence I briefly thought about what type of turbine I could install and how it would look. Making the turbine The mast

Recent Research On Rocket Mass Heaters (& Bell Design) There appears to be a huge amount of traffic and discussion through different internet forums about rocket mass heaters and reports from the authors on sales of the book on the subject confirm this incredible surge in interest. I am quite certain that this excitement stems from the tangible possibility that the rocket mass heater concept offers to individuals and families to build their own affordable efficient wood-fired heating system. I thought it would be interesting and useful to offer the following synthesis of recent research I have been directly involved in and links to information that others have provided to feed more fuel to the fire of this interesting global conversation. Article Table of Contents: The Difference between Rocket Stoves and Rocket Mass Heaters First, a clarification regarding terms may be useful. The Book on Rocket Mass Heaters There is a wonderful book on Rocket Mass Heaters. The MHA Experience Construction Processes with Commentary Conclusion: Suggest a link!

How To Sharpen a Knife Like a Bad-Ass Boy Scout DIY: Beer Can Into Camping Stove You can whip one of these up in a matter of minutes. They’re so easy to make and they work really well. First find yourself some scissors and a beverage can and then start the above video. This is an inexpensive way to be prepared in the event of a power outage as these stoves give off a lot of heat and have the ability to cook large meals. They also make great holiday gifts for friends and family. For more great repurposing ideas, check out Repurposing 24/7 Image: Vimeo camp stoveDIYRepurposing Related Posts « After Reading This, You’ll Never Look at a Banana in the Same Way Again The Remedy For Everything But Death »

14 Bright Ideas For A Better Wood Stove The 14 finalists for the Wood Stove Design Challenge will be formally judged during a weeklong Wood Stove Decathlon at the National Mall in November, when a team of stove, air quality, and combustion experts will select the winning stove based on five criteria: emissions, efficiency, affordability, innovation, and ease of use. Throughout the challenge we'll see plenty of innovation, but its impact could be insignificant unless we—the consumers—embrace clean-burning technology in meaningful numbers. And that's less likely to happen if next-generation stoves lack compelling benefits or are simply unappealing to the end user. Here's where you can help. We'll present a separate People's Choice award to the stove you think is the most innovative.

How to pack a whole lot of living into 221 square feet One of the key limitations in the design of many tiny houses is the fact that they have to be built on trailer chassis. Many zoning bylaws have minimum building sizes to keep the riffraff out and the property taxes up; many building codes have minimum room sizes and other rules that make it very hard to build small. By having wheels, it becomes a recreational vehicle and it can sneak under a lot of radars. © Tiny House Build Andrew and Gabriella Morrison have pulled it off in their 221 square foot home and write about it (and how they live in it) on the Tiny House Blog. To our surprise we have not felt, at any point, that we have had to make any compromises or sacrifices in our self designed and built home. By putting the kitchen at one end and the bathroom at the other, they are able to use the full width of the trailer and make them generous. The bathroom is also generous, which you need if you are going to use a big Sun-Mar composting toilet (and the bigger, the better.

Coolest Hack Ever? Cool Water + Pipes + Fan = DIY AC When life gives you lemons, you make lemonade. When life gives you an apartment with no air conditioning, you grab some supplies and make your own air conditioner. A clever Flickr user did just that and documented his project with annotated pictures. Starting off with a regular oscillating tabletop fan, he wrapped copper tubing in a spiral around the front and back of the fan. Flexible plastic tubing connects the copper coils to the reservoir below so that the fan can still oscillate. Fish tank pumps cycle cold water up, through the coils, and back down.

100 Best DIY Sites on the Web 100 Best DIY Sites on the Web Saturday, February 26, 2011 at 6:06pm by Site Administrator DIY offers a great way to take on personal projects and make things your own. Although often DIY focuses primarily on home improvement, the DIY ethic expands out to arts, technology, and so much more. Check out these categories and more in our list of DIY sites that’s sure to get you inspired to get up and make something yourself. Home Improvement In these sites, you’ll find fun and useful projects to take on at home. Arts & Crafts Whether you want to learn how to make your own macro lens, or just find a knitting pattern, these sites will have what you’re looking for. Tech Find everything you want to know about hacking gadgets, electronics, and more from these sites. Makezine: Learn how to make your own fun electronic and tech toys with this site.Freedom to Tinker: Check out this site to learn how to modify and repair tech devices.Hack This Site! Lifehacking General

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