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Articles of the Week (AoW)

Articles of the Week (AoW)
Please note that, as I explain in-depth in this blog post, I take no credit for coming up with the article of the week (AoW) assignment. Kelly Gallagher (or, as I sometimes call him, The Gallagher) is the man who first introduced me to the idea through his must-read book Readicide. Thus, anything I share about my classroom’s experiences with AoWs, any theories or experiments I try out with the assignment, and any success my students or I have with it thoroughly and ultimately traces back to Kelly’s work. Here’s the list from this school year: “”Follow Your Bliss” Advice,” from The Week. If you have an AoW you’ve used this year that you’d like to share, contact me — I’d love to post it for the good of the community. Here’s the list for this school year: “American Prisoner in North Korea Requests Rescue,” by Choe Sang-Hun for the New York Times. Below is a list of articles I prepared for the 2012-2013 school year. Ready to Dominate Articles of the Week?

Document Analysis Worksheets Document analysis is the first step in working with primary sources. Teach your students to think through primary source documents for contextual understanding and to extract information to make informed judgments. Use these worksheets — for photos, written documents, artifacts, posters, maps, cartoons, videos, and sound recordings — to teach your students the process of document analysis. Follow this progression: The first few times you ask students to work with primary sources, and whenever you have not worked with primary sources recently, model careful document analysis using the worksheets. Don’t stop with document analysis though. Materials created by the National Archives and Records Administration are in the public domain. These worksheets were revised in February, 2017.

Put That on the List: Collaboratively Writing a Catalog Poem ReadWriteThink couldn't publish all of this great content without literacy experts to write and review for us. If you've got lessons plans, videos, activities, or other ideas you'd like to contribute, we'd love to hear from you. More Find the latest in professional publications, learn new techniques and strategies, and find out how you can connect with other literacy professionals. More Teacher Resources by Grade Your students can save their work with Student Interactives. More Home › Classroom Resources › Lesson Plans Lesson Plan Materials and Technology Student Interactives Printouts Websites Preparation Copies of “Fear” in All of Us by Raymond Carver (Vintage) back to top Grades K – 12 | Student Interactive | Writing & Publishing Prose Printing Press The interactive Printing Press is designed to assist students in creating newspapers, brochures, and flyers. Obtain copies of Raymond Carver’s poem “Fear,” which appears in his book All of Us: The Collected Poems (NY: Vintage Contemporaries, 2000).

Inferring How and Why Characters Change ReadWriteThink couldn't publish all of this great content without literacy experts to write and review for us. If you've got lessons plans, activities, or other ideas you'd like to contribute, we'd love to hear from you. More Find the latest in professional publications, learn new techniques and strategies, and find out how you can connect with other literacy professionals. More Teacher Resources by Grade Your students can save their work with Student Interactives. More Home › Classroom Resources › Lesson Plans Lesson Plan Student Objectives Session 1. Session 2. Session 3. Extensions Student Assessment/Reflections Students will Infer character traitsSupport inferences with evidence from the textInfer how a character changes across a textExplain why that character may have changed back to top Session 1. Session 2. Session 3. Provide students with a short story in which a character changes.

Writing Editorials PassagBank.com - A Passage Search Engine for Teachers creative writing prompts . com ideas for writers Rules for Comma Usage Use a comma to separate the elements in a series (three or more things), including the last two. "He hit the ball, dropped the bat, and ran to first base." You may have learned that the comma before the "and" is unnecessary, which is fine if you're in control of things. Use a comma + a little conjunction (and, but, for, nor, yet, or, so) to connect two independent clauses, as in "He hit the ball well, but he ran toward third base." Contending that the coordinating conjunction is adequate separation, some writers will leave out the comma in a sentence with short, balanced independent clauses (such as we see in the example just given). One of the most frequent errors in comma usage is the placement of a comma after a coordinating conjunction. Use a comma to set off introductory elements, as in "Running toward third base, he suddenly realized how stupid he looked." Appositives are almost always treated as parenthetical elements. We visited Hartford, Connecticut, last summer.

House of the Scorpion The House of the Scorpionby Nancy Farmer Fields of white opium poppies stretch away over the hills, and uniformed workers bend over the rows, harvesting the juice. This is the empire of Matteo Alacran, a feudal drug lord in the country of Opium, which lies between the United States and Aztlan, formerly Mexico. Field work, or any menial tasks, are done by “eejits,” humans in whose brains computer chips have been installed to insure docility. Alacran, or El Patron, has lived 140 years with the help of transplants from a series of clones, a common practice among rich men in this world. <---- More The intelligence of clones is usually destroyed at birth, but Matt, the latest of Alacran’s doubles, has been spared because he belongs to El Patron.

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