background preloader

How To Yarn Bomb

How To Yarn Bomb
I get asked all the time "How do you yarn bomb exactly?" So here's a How To guide on yarn bombing. This is just from my personal experience. Everyone does it differently. Everyone needs to find their own flow. Also keep in mind that I only crochet my yarn bombs. Start with something small like a small pole piece or a granny square and then you'd be done in no time and won't be discouraged with such a large time consuming project. 2. 4. If using only sewing, you run the risk of the piece not staying tied securely to the object. Sewing a tag onto a horizontal object like a banister is fine as it will generally stay well. 8. 9. More helpful links:What You'll Need To Take When Yarn Bombing Things To Remember About Yarn BombingIdeas For Yarn Bombs To Make Luv Bali. P.S.

http://twilighttaggers.blogspot.com/2011/03/how-to-yarn-bomb.html

Related:  Yarn BombingthehelpfulnursesYarn Bombingyarnbombingschoolgraciepie456

Yarn bombing Yarn bombing, yarnbombing, yarn storming, guerrilla knitting, kniffiti, urban knitting or graffiti knitting is a type of graffiti or street art that employs colourful displays of knitted or crocheted yarn or fibre rather than paint or chalk. Method and motivation[edit] While yarn installations – called yarn bombs or yarnstorms – may last for years, they are considered non-permanent, and, unlike other forms of graffiti, can be easily removed if necessary. Nonetheless, the practice is still technically illegal in some jurisdictions, though it is not often prosecuted vigorously.[1] While other forms of graffiti may be expressive, decorative, territorial, socio-political commentary, advertising or vandalism, yarn bombing was initially almost exclusively about reclaiming and personalizing sterile or cold public places.[2] It has since developed with groups graffiti knitting and crocheting worldwide, each with their own agendas and public graffiti knitting projects being run.[3] History[edit]

Not Your Grandma's Knitting: 20 Incredible Yarn Bombs While certain types of permanent graffiti can be a very beautiful addition to an otherwise bland space, much of the time it's unattractive and a pain to remove. Yarn bombing, however, is a completely different story. Easily removable, yarn bombing focuses less on making a permanent statement and more on lending a sense of warmth to colder spaces. Not Your Grandma's Knitting: 20 Incredible Yarn Bombs While certain types of permanent graffiti can be a very beautiful addition to an otherwise bland space, much of the time it's unattractive and a pain to remove. Yarn bombing, however, is a completely different story. Easily removable, yarn bombing focuses less on making a permanent statement and more on lending a sense of warmth to colder spaces.

Yarn Bombing Wikipedia describes yarn bombing as "a type of graffiti or street art that employs colorful displays of knitted or crocheted cloth rather than paint or chalk." Knitted, crocheted or woven pieces are sewn around inanimate public objects such as bike racks, light poles, telephone boxes and abandoned buses. The purpose is to bring some beauty and wonder into otherwise drab and everyday surroundings.

Yarn Bombing: 10 of the Most Brilliant Yarn-Bombs Ever - The Chromologist The problem with regular paint based graffiti or street art is that it very often needs to be painted over afterwards or, in the case of Banksy, the whole section of wall removed and wheeled off to the auction house. Enter yarn bombing / graffiti knitting / guerilla knitting. This form of street art is far less permanent through it’s use of colourful yarn or fibre, although it’s still technically illegal in some places. The results can be beautiful, transforming regular objects like trees, cars, steps or even buildings from dull to delightful. In London, the mysterious organisation ‘Knit The City‘ arrange covert kitting operations, jumping out into the street from their headquarters and enveloping telephone boxes and other publicly accessible object with bright yarn. Lauren O’Farrell (Deadly Knitshade) heads up Knit The City (as well as the crafty Stitch London).

How to Yarn Bomb: Tips & Tricks from a Pro Have you seen trees and statues covered with brightly covered yarn in your neighborhood and wondered how it was done? Or have you seen photos of knitted or crocheted statues online and dreamed of becoming your town’s next yarn bomber? If so, you’ve come to the right place. Here, we’ll reveal how to yarn bomb in five steps.

2410 × 2297 - artsyforager.wordpress.com 2874 × 1829 - hallscreekfestival.com 611 × 404 - content.time.com 1992 × 1328 - commons.wikimedia.org How to Weave on a Cardboard Loom June 25th, 2008 Email 1322 users recommend Weaving like this can be the basis for so many projects: place mats, coasters, bags, hats—use your imagination. All photos by Diane Gilleland Two ways of making woolly pompoms When I was younger and a family member or friend was expecting a baby, my Mum would encourage me and my brother to make pompoms for the new baby. So it seemed only right that I would make a few for my own twins who are due any day! I have found 2 ways of making pompoms, which I will call the ‘traditional’ way and the ‘quick’ way. Let’s start with the traditional way. For this you will need: Wool (any type, in 1 or more colours)Card (I used a piece of a cardboard box)Scissors

Halls Creek Festival - Yarn Bombing Saturday and SundayDiscovery Village Calling all Knitters & Crocheters! Yarn bombing is a community art project where people come together to cover objects in yarn. KNITS FOR LIFE We make, install, maintain, and remove the vast majority of our work and almost always get permission to install. We have never “gotten in trouble” or been asked to remove a new yarnbomb. Our yarnbombs do not damage flora and fauna. Yarnbombing is not a waste of time. 2410 × 2297 - artsyforager.wordpress.com 2874 × 1829 - hallscreekfestival.com 611 × 404 - content.time.com

Related: