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Using Twitter for Professional Development

Using Twitter for Professional Development
The term “professional development” conjures up thoughts of travel, conference fees, arranging substitutes, and loss of precious instructional time. But does it have to entail all that? Actually, no. If you aren’t yet familiar with Twitter, it’s a social networking platform where users share everything from what they had for breakfast to professional dilemmas – all in 140 characters or less. Educators on Twitter often discuss what’s working in their classrooms and how they’ve addressed important issues – much like you might with your peers. The Virtual Watercooler Colleagues are a greatly underutilized professional development resource within the school building, and staff often remark about the benefits of setting aside time for collaboration with co-workers. Making professional connections via social networking can not only result in a lot of great sharing of ideas and resources, but also combat the sense of isolation that many teachers experience. Hesitant to get started? Experts Say… Related:  Using Twitter in EducationTwitter websitesTwitter Articles

Over 100 ideas for using Twitter in the Classroom This handful of resources provide about 100 different ideas for, and examples of, using Twitter in the classroom. It’s been almost 8 months since I published the post, “6 Examples of Using Twitter in the Classroom”, about uses of the popular micro-blogging tool in the instructional setting. This post generated a lot of traffic, and continues to attract hundreds of viewers every week. Since that brief posting, I’ve come across a lot of articles containing examples and suggestions for using Twitter in instructional applications. Here we have 25 Ways to Teach with Twitter from Sonja Cole.Here’s 10 great ideas on how to use Twitter in the classroom, from blogger Steve Wheeler.This extensive list provides 50 ways to use Twitter in the College Classroom.This Twitter for Academia post suggests 13 different ways to use Twitter in the classroom.Lastly, this PDF file discusses the experience of teacher Ana Dominquez using Twitter in the Kindergarten classroom. About Kelly Walsh Print This Post

50 Ways to Use Twitter in the Classroom Many critics of Twitter believe that the 140-character microblog offered by the ubiquitous social network can do little for the education industry. They are wrong. K-12 teachers have taken advantage of Twitter’s format to keep their classes engaged and up-to-date on the latest technologies. The following projects provide you and your students with 50 ways to Twitter in the classroom to create important and lasting lessons. 1. One of the simplest ways that teachers can use Twitter in the classroom involves setting up a feed dedicated exclusively to due dates, tests or quizzes. 2. Subscribe to different mainstream and independent news feeds with different biases as a way to compare and contrast how different perspectives interpret current events and issues. 3. Set up an interesting assignment requesting that students set up Twitter for education lists following feeds relevant to their career goals and keep a daily journal on any trends that crop up along the way. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8. 9. 10. 11.

How to Use Twitter to Grow Your PLN For many people, Twitter conjures up the worst of the internet: disjointed, meaningless phrases, unrecognizable abbreviations, and endless drivel about where someone's getting their double mocha today. So, Why Tweet?!?! For the inquisitive educator, there are some jewels herein that can lead to stimulating discussions, new resources, and an ongoing supportive network. To that end, here is a list of educationally focused chats that we recommend (listed by day): Chat for educators teaching 4th grade #4thchat Mondays 8pm ET/5pm PT/7pm CT Chat for educators teaching social studies #sschat Mondays 7pm ET/4pm PT/6pm CT Chat for music educators #musedchat Mondays 8pm ET/5pm PT Chat for ELL educators #ellchat Mondays 9pm ET/6pm PT Kindergarten Chat #kinderchat Mondays 9pm ET/6pm PT General education chat #edchat Tuesdays 12 noon ET/ 9am PT 7pm ET/4pm PT Chat for science educators #scichat Tuesdays 9pm ET/6pm PT Chat for new and pre-service teachers #ntchat Wednesdays 8pm ET/5pm PT Set up an account

The Beginner’s Guide to Twitter Twitter Literacy (I refuse to make up a Twittery name for it) - City Brights: Howard Rheingold Post-Oprah and apres-Ashton, Twittermania is definitely sliding down the backlash slope of the hype cycle. It’s not just the predictable wave of naysaying after the predictable waves of sliced-breadism and bandwagon-chasing. We’re beginning to see some data. When I started requiring digital journalism students to learn how to use Twitter, I didn’t have the list of journalistic uses for Twitter that I have compiled by now. One of my students asked me online why I use Twitter. Openness – anyone can join, and anyone can follow anyone else (unless they restrict access to friends who request access). Immediacy – it is a rolling present. Variety – political or technical argument, gossip, scientific info, news flashes, poetry, social arrangements, classrooms, repartee, scholarly references, bantering with friends. A channel to multiple publics – I’m a communicator and have a following that I want to grow and feed. A way to meet new people – it happens every day.

Using Twitter for Professional Development Opportunities Have you dismissed Twitter as overwhelming, noisy, and beyond what you need to function as a good library service provider? Are you looking for a free source for professional development opportunities that requires minimum time and produces maximum results? Need a source for critical information delivered almost instantly? Twitter as a ubiquitous, concise, and powerful social media platform is not a fad. It can, however, feel overwhelming, or even silly, if you don’t take the very little time needed to get to understand its nuts, bolts, best practices, and professional power. At the end of this one-hour webinar, participants will:

The Ultimate Guide To Using Twitter In Education Twitter seems to be here to stay. As one of the most popular ways for teachers, students, and the general public to communicate, it’s becoming a must-have tool in almost every teacher’s toolbox. However, numerous recent studies have shown that education in general has been slow to adopt social media. In an effort to speed up this adoption process, below you’ll find a boatload of resources on the past, present, and future of Twitter in education as well as some helpful guides to using the tool in the classroom. This guide is by no means exhaustive and is meant to be added to on a regular basis. The History of Communication The following is a guest post excerpt from Ernesto Priego of The Guardian (UK). With that in mind, the future of communication in the form of social media is examined as a way to forever alter the world of education. The idea of slow adoption was featured on Edudemic last week and is certainly going to be an issue going forth as well. The Twitter Experiment Dr.

25 Ways to Get the Most Out of Twitter Imagine being able to connect with one hundred million people anytime you want. With that many people on Twitter each day (and that’s not counting the additional 184 million users who are on Twitter at least once each month), a great deal of knowledge, perspective, and news is accessible to you, just by clicking a few buttons. It’s no wonder educators are harnessing the power of Twitter to bring cutting edge ideas, trends, research, and best practices to use in their schools and classrooms. But just as Twitter can be a treasure trove of information, it can be overwhelming for new users to figure out how to use it effectively. We’ve compiled this list of the best ways to make Twitter a social media tool that works for you. Image from Flickr via mkh marketing Get Started 1. 2. Find People 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. Find Conversations 8. 9. 10.

Using Twitter as a Professional Development Tool Last week during a discussion about design, Jeanette Campos asked me a fairly is simple question: What are the three artifacts that have shaped you most as a designer of creative learning solutions to complex problems? Immediately one word came to mind: Twitter. It isn't the tool itself that has been so impact full for me; it's the world to which Twitter opened up to me. I started my career as a learning and performance professional much the same way many in our field do: without any training or education on what it means to work in this field. It's a challenge for individuals and for the industry as a whole. It leads to a "We do what we do because it's what's always been done in this organization" approach to training. I recall those early years well. Then I discovered Twitter. To be fair, it was social media in general that enabled me to extend beyond the walls of my organization and connect with others externally in the field. I connected with a few individuals at first.

Twitter: a step-by-step guide to getting started If the recent buzz around Twitter, the micro-blogging platform, has aroused your curiosity you may be wondering how to get started. Twitter is not a publishing platform, as I said yesterday, so you can’t simply go to the site and read it. Well, you can but that’s not really the point. To get the most out of Twitter you need to build a network and then start using a few tools. So here’s a step-by-step guide. Getting started1. 2. 3. 4. Start building your network5. 6. 7. Talking to people8. 9. 10. 11. 12. Tools13.

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