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Why Creative People Need to Be Eccentric

Why Creative People Need to Be Eccentric
Creative people have a reputation for eccentricity. It’s not hard to see why when we consider the habits of some well-known creatives. Like Truman Capote: I am a completely horizontal author. I can’t think unless I’m lying down, either in bed or stretched on a couch and with a cigarette and coffee handy. I’ve got to be puffing and sipping. Or Friedrich Schiller, as described by fellow poet Stephen Spender: Schiller liked to have a smell of rotten apples, concealed beneath his desk, under his nose when he was composing poetry. [from "Creativity", ed. All of my pictures are created against a background of music. [From "Creators on Creating", Ed. He gave all of his clothes to his servant, admonishing him NOT to return them until he (Hugo) had completed his day’s work. Or novelist Orhan Pamuk: In the mornings I used to say goodbye to my wife like someone going to work. Apparently the apples reminded Schiller of his youth, wandering lovestruck through the orchards in autumn. How About You? Related:  CreateMind Into Matter

The Creative Addiction Blog | Page 2 Introduction My name is Charissa and I’m a mixed media artist that grew up crying in art class. Really. I only discovered my love for art about a year and a half ago. I use a lot of layers, collage, paint, paper and ink in my pages. What are you creatively addicted to? I am creatively addicted to processing trauma through art. What’s your inspiration? I’ve always been a creative person. Do you have any upcoming projects? I consistently create in about 6 journals at a time. Where can people find your work? The Smashbook is where you can find my art and all the other links to my stuff online! Blog: www.thesmashbook.com Facebook: www.facebook.com/thesmashbook Twitter: www.twitter.com/smashbook Instagram: www.instagram.com/smashbook Name one thing you would like people to know about you. I cried my eyes out in an art class when I was in third grade. Like this: Like Loading...

21 Habits of Happy People Contributed by Cindy Holbrook “Happiness is a habit – cultivate it.” ~ Elbert Hubbar Happiness is one aspiration all people share. No one wants to be sad and depressed. We’ve all seen people who are always happy – even amidst agonizing life trials. 1. Be thankful that you woke up alive each morning. 2. Surround yourself with happy, positive people who share your values and goals. 3. Accept others for who they are as well as where they are in life. 4. Keep up to date with the latest news regarding your career and hobbies. 5. Don’t wallow in self-pity. 6. Some statistics show that 80% of people dislike their jobs! 7. Take the time to see the beauty around you. 8. Don’t take yourself – or life to seriously. 9. Holding a grudge will hurt no one but you. 10. Develop an attitude of gratitude. 11. Always make sure your loved ones know you love them even in times of conflict. 12. Honesty is the best policy. 13. Meditation gives your very active brain a rest. 14. 15. See the glass as half full.

Five creative tactics for selling paintings online | Work Your Art It’s the 21st Century – and every painter you know is on Twitter and Facebook marketing their paintings. In order to achieve great results and stand out from the crowd, you, the creative entrepreneur, have to go about marketing and selling your work in a more creative way. Coming up with unique and unusual tactics yourself is crucial, but in this article I’ll provide you with five examples to spark your imagination. 1. Whenever I create content, I find that the best way to make it go viral is to transform it into a video and publish it on Youtube. 2. As Pinterest is getting more popular these days, it’s also becoming a great resource for artists looking to get inspirational pictures. 3. 4. Whether you already have a shop online or you’re brand new to the e-commerce side of things, it’s always a good thing to have your work up for sale on multiple places. 5. Need more actionable advice?

The Science of Productivity. “It is not enough to be busy… The question is: what are we busy about?” ~ Henry David Thoreau Busy is already a given in our twenty-first century stampede. Meet Lady Productivity, our century’s muse. How do you assess your productivity? Contrary to what we tend to believe and try, productivity can’t be increased only by willpower, ability, or the amount of time we spend on a project. Optimal productivity boils down to a healthy balance between work and play, activity and rest. The brilliant creators at AsapSCIENCE, try to decode productivity in this animated science bite: Created by AsapSCIENCE in collaboration with Sparring Mind. Review, Rewind, Remember… Tips to boost your productivity: 1. What works for you? What doesn’t? What could? What’s the first step? Take it now? More creative, compact curiosity by AsapSCIENCE: >> Could Zombies Exist? >> The Scientific Power of Naps. >> What’s behind an orgasm. >> Amazing facts to blow your mind. >> The science of procrastination & how to manage it.

Stephen King's Top 20 Rules for Writers Image by the USO, via Flickr Commons In one of my favorite Stephen King interviews, for The Atlantic, he talks at length about the vital importance of a good opening line. “There are all sorts of theories,” he says, “it’s a tricky thing.” “But there’s one thing” he’s sure about: “An opening line should invite the reader to begin the story. It should say: Listen. Come in here. We’ve talked so much about the reader, but you can’t forget that the opening line is important to the writer, too. This is excellent advice. Revision in the second draft, “one of them, anyway,” may “necessitate some big changes” says King in his 2000 memoir slash writing guide On Writing. 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8. 9. 10. 11. 12. 13. 14. 15. 16. 17. 18. 19. 20. See a fuller exposition of King’s writing wisdom at Barnes & Noble’s blog. Related Content: Stephen King Creates a List of 96 Books for Aspiring Writers to Read Stephen King Writes A Letter to His 16-Year-Old Self: “Stay Away from Recreational Drugs”

The Long Game: Brilliant Visual Essays on the Only Secret to Creative Success, from Leonardo da Vinci to Marie Curie by Maria Popova Why showing up day in and day out without fail is the surest way to achieve lasting success. “Expect anything worthwhile to take a long time,” a wise woman once said — a seemingly simple observation that is among the 7 most important things I’ve learned in the many years of doing what I do. This notion of doggedness is something countless admired creators have advocated — from Anthony Trollope’s advice to aspiring writers to Tchaikovsky’s admonition about work ethic — and it’s even something scientists have confirmed, in finding that “grit” is a greater predictor of success than intelligence. That mythology of genius is precisely what British filmmaker Adam Westbrook explores in his fantastic video essay series The Long Game — a feat of storytelling partway between Kirby Ferguson’s remix culture documentaries and Temujin Doran’s cinematic essays. Thanks, Kirby Donating = Loving Bringing you (ad-free) Brain Pickings takes hundreds of hours each month. Share on Tumblr

Paper Goods | Page 3 sur 11 12 Habits Of Productive People, by The Huffington Post Wish you wasted less time and got more done? Welcome to the club. So why is it, then, when we mean well and are focused on the task at hand, we can still manage to get bogged down by things like emails and weekly reports? The key to being productive is knowing your priorities, notes Robert Pozen, a senior lecturer of business administration at Harvard Business School. He's also the former president of Fidelity and executive chairman of MFS Investment Management, author of "Extreme Productivity: Boost Your Results, Reduce Your Hours," and teaches courses on maximizing personal productivity. Being "productive means getting a lot done relative to something. We asked Pozen and Adam Grant, a professor of management at the Wharton School at the University of Pennsylvania and author of "Give and Take: A Revolutionary Approach to Success," to share the secret habits of productive people -- so you can become one too. 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8. Need to get something done? 9. 10. 11. 12.

30 Amazingly Creative Examples of Designer Resumes | inspirationfeed.com - Aurora It’s extremely hard to find a job these days! The market is slow, the economy is bad, and the competition is fierce. To get a job you will have to stand out of the crowd. Please keep in mind that if you apply to companies that have nothing to do with the design field, they wont appreciate your artfulness. However, I think if you are in the design field you need to show off your creativity. Resume is a French word that means summing up. The “DO’s” of a Resume: Write it YourselfBrief, Concise, Action-OrientedRewrite/ReviseAccurate (Not Puffed Up)Emphasize StrengthsDeemphasize WeaknessesHave your resume professionally edited “Dont’s” of a Resume: Photos or Illustrations ( In the Design Field you can go against this rule)Reasons You Left Past JobsSalaryFeelings About Travel or RelocationTestimonialsPolitics or Religion Essential Components Of A Resume: Personal Data/Contact InformationEducationExperience (Appropriate Volunteer Work)Achievements, Skills, and Qualifications

Linguistic family tree reveals the roots of Nordic languages A survey of more than 3 million patients who’ve been under anaesthetic in the UK and Ireland has provided new insight into the traumatic experiences of those who have woken up during surgery. According to the research, led by Oxford University Hospitals in the UK, the phenomenon, known as “anaesthesia awareness” is relatively rare - roughly only one in 19,600 patients surveyed had woken up during surgery. This is lower than previous US studies, which suggested the rate was as high as one in 1,000 surgical patients. But for lighter anaesthesia procedures, such as emergency C-sections, the risk is much higher - around one in 670 had experienced it. Anaesthesia awareness was also more common among patients who had received paralytics - substances that block the nerves from stimulating muscles - as part of their anaesthetic mix. And, as you would expect, the experience was terrifying. But there is some good news. “I was awake but paralysed,” Weihrer told CNN. Education is also critical.

Ushering In the Creative Age - Chicago Policy Review Alan Freeman writes that the age of creation lies before us—if we can rediscover the lost art of investing in humans. Alan Freeman was the principal economist in the Greater London Authority’s Economic Analysis Unit from 2001 to 2011, and now writes and advises on cultural policy. While with the GLA’s intelligence unit, he produced a series of reports that defined the field of measuring the cultural and creative industry activity of large cities. These were Creativity: London’s Core Business, the first comprehensive study of London’s cultural and creative industries, five subsequent updates, and London: A Cultural Audit, a rigorous comparison of the cultural offer of London, Shanghai, Paris, New York and Tokyo. The ‘creative industries’, a term popularized by the 1997 British labor government, are a copywriters’ dream. Alan Freeman But these enticing ideas are disputable. Yet it’s a technology of a radically new type, in which labor, not machinery, is the driver of growth.

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