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Satan

Satan
Satan (Hebrew: שָּׂטָן satan, "adversary,"[1]) is a term, later a character appearing in the texts of the Abrahamic religions[2][3] who personifies evil and temptation, and is known as the deceiver that leads humanity astray. The term is often applied to an angel who fell out of favor with God, seducing humanity into the ways of sin, and who now rules over the fallen world. Satan is primarily understood as an "accuser" or "adversary" in the Hebrew Bible, and is not necessarily the personification of evil that he would become in later Abrahamic religions. In the New Testament, Satan is a name that refers to a decidedly malevolent entity (devil) who possesses demonic god-like qualities. In Theistic Satanism, Satan is considered a positive force and deity who is either worshipped or revered. In LaVeyan Satanism, Satan is regarded as holding virtuous characteristics.[4][5] Judaism Hebrew Bible Thirteen occurrences Job ch.1–2 (10x),[8]Zechariah 3:1–2 (3x).[9] Book of Job Second Temple period Related:  Angels and Demons

Metatron Origins[edit] The identification of Metatron with Enoch is not explicitly made in the Talmud although it does reference a Prince of the World who was young but now is old. However, some of the earliest kabbalists assumed the connection. Talmud[edit] The Talmud relates that Elisha ben Abuyah (a rabbi and Jewish religious authority born in Jerusalem sometime before 70 CE), also called Acher (אחר, "other", as he became an apostate), entered Paradise and saw Metatron sitting down (an action that is not done in the presence of God). The Talmud states, it was proved to Elisha that Metatron could not be a second deity by the fact that Metatron received 60 "strokes with fiery rods" to demonstrate that Metatron was not a god, but an angel, and could be punished.[5] The Babylonian Talmud mentions Metatron in two other places: Sanhedrin 38b and Avodah Zarah 3b. Merkabah and later mystical writings[edit] And Enoch walked with God: and he was not; for God took him. Etymology[edit] See also[edit]

All About Stargates - Cosmic Starseeds By Michelle Walling, CHLC www.michellewalling.com Some people on planet Earth feel like they are truly “home”. For those who do not feel like this planet is their home, there is a deep longing to define where home is. “Home” could be the “New Earth”, a place in the celestial mansions, or a planet in another galaxy, universe, or cosmos. For those who would like to leave this planet, it is possible that we would do so through a stargate. The groups of humans on planet Earth There are many people on the planet at this time from other worlds, galaxies, and universes to assist humanity and the planet with the transformation they are going through as a collective consciousness. There are souls that are here to wake up and remember their mission of raising their vibration in order to help the planet and to help heal others by having an impact on raising their vibration. Some souls were born on the planet to simply ride the merry go round, laugh, and play to raise the vibration of the planet.

Demon In Ancient Near Eastern religions as well as in the Abrahamic traditions, including ancient and medieval Christian demonology, a demon is considered an unclean spirit, sometimes a fallen angel, the spirit of a deceased human, or a spirit of unknown type which may cause demonic possession, calling for an exorcism. In Western occultism and Renaissance magic, which grew out of an amalgamation of Greco-Roman magic, Jewish demonology and Christian tradition,[2] a demon is a spiritual entity that may be conjured and controlled. Terminology[edit] The Greek term does not have any connotations of evil or malevolence. In fact, εὐδαιμονία eudaimonia, (literally good-spiritedness) means happiness. The supposed existence of demons remains an important concept in many modern religions and occultist traditions. Psychological archetype[edit] M. By tradition[edit] Ancient Near East[edit] Mesopotamia[edit] Human-headed winged bull, otherwise known as a Lamassu Ancient Arabia[edit] Hebrew Bible[edit]

Sandalphon Sandalphon (Hebrew: סָנְדַלְפוֹן‎; Greek: Σανδαλφών) is an archangel in Jewish and Christian writings. Sandalphon figures prominently in the mystical literary traditions of Rabbinic Judaism and early Christianity, notably in the Midrash, Talmud, and Kabbalah. Origin[edit] Meaning of name[edit] The name Sandalphon, the protector of unborn children. Descriptions and functions[edit] Physical descriptions of Sandalphon vary depending on the source. The ancient sages also referred to him by the name Ophan (Hebrew for "wheel"), a reference to the "wheel within the wheel" from Ezekiel's vision of the merkabah (heavenly chariot) in Ezekiel chapter 1.[7] Sandalphon is also said to be instrumental in bringing about the differentiation of sex in the embryo.[6] In Kabbalah, Sandalphon is the angel who represents the sephirah of Malkhut[8] and overlaps (or is confused with) the angel Metatron. References[edit]

Watcher (angel) Watching angel on the spire of St Michael's church, Clifton Hampden, Oxfordshire, England In the Book of Daniel 4:13, 17, 23[4] there are three references to the class of "watcher, holy one" (watcher, Aramaic `iyr; holy one, Aramaic qaddiysh). The term is introduced by Nebuchadnezzar who says he saw "a watcher, a holy one come down (singular verb) from heaven." He describes how in his dream the watcher says that Nebuchadnezzar will eat grass and be mad and that this punishment is "by the decree of the Watchers, the demand by the word of the Holy Ones" - "the living may know that the Most High rules in the kingdom of men." After hearing the king's dream Daniel considers for an hour and then responds: Lutheran Protestant reformer Johann Wigand viewed the watcher in Nebuchadnezzar's dream as either God himself, or the Son of God. The use of the term "Watchers" is common in the Book of Enoch. The chiefs of tens, listed in the Book of Enoch, are as follows:

Uriel Uriel (אוּרִיאֵל "El/God is my light", Auriel/Oriel (God is my light) Standard Hebrew Uriʾel, Tiberian Hebrew ʾÛrîʾēl) is one of the archangels of post-Exilic Rabbinic tradition, and also of certain Christian traditions. In Judaism and Christianity[edit] Name and origins[edit] Uriel is often identified as a cherub and angel of repentance.[4] He "stands at the Gate of Eden with a fiery sword",[5] or as the angel who "watches over thunder and terror".[6] In the Apocalypse of Peter he appears as the Angel of Repentance, who is graphically represented as being as pitiless as any demon. He checked the doors of Egypt for lamb's blood during the plague. In Thomas Heywood's Hierarchy of Blessed Angels (1635), Uriel is described as an Angel of the Earth. At the Council of Rome of 745, Pope St. In the first half of the 11th century Bulgarian followers of the dualist heresy called Bogomilism who lived in the dukedom of Ahtum in present day Banat invoked Uriel in rituals. In Enoch[edit] Amen[14]

Archdemon In Biblical tradition, an archdemon (also spelled archdaemon) is a spiritual entity, prominent in the infernal hierarchy as a leader of the infernal host.[1] Essentially, the archdemons is the counterpart of the archangels. Archdemons are described as the leaders of demonic hosts, just as archangels lead choirs of angels. In the Occult tradition, there is controversy regarding which demons should be classed as archdemons. During different ages, some demons were historically 'promoted' to archdemons, others were completely forgotten, and new ones were created. In ancient Jewish lore, pagan gods of neighboring cultures were classed as extremely pernicious in order to protect Jews from worshiping them; therefore, Ba'al and Astarte were among the worst enemies of God. During the Middle Ages these characterizations were no longer important, but still persisted. Historically, what an archdemon is and the names of those demons has varied greatly over time.

Yasuke: The African Samurai | The Daily Beagle Japan is not a place one would usually associate with immigrants from Africa or the Caribbean. Yet in the late 16th century Japan’s most powerful warlord, Oda Nobunaga, had a black page who was not only a cultural curiosity but also served as Nobunaga’s bodyguard and was granted the prestigious rank of Samurai. This was a time of incessant warfare as the Ashikaga Shogunate fell and Japan became a war-torn nation with each tribe vying for control of against rival warlords. During this time the key to supremacy lay in controlling the powerless Emperor in his court in Kyoto. In the mid 16th century this civil war was nearing its end with the arrival of the Europeans and their modern armaments, guns and cannons. Nobunaga is himself a very interesting character. Nobunaga was obsessed with all things Western besides their armour and armaments and is one of the first recorded Japanese men to have worn Western clothing, use tables and chairs, and drink wine from goblets. Like this:

Watcher (angel) Watching angel on the spire of St Michael's church, Clifton Hampden, Oxfordshire, England In the Book of Daniel 4:13, 17, 23[4] there are three references to the class of "watcher, holy one" (watcher, Aramaic `iyr; holy one, Aramaic qaddiysh). The term is introduced by Nebuchadnezzar who says he saw "a watcher, a holy one come down (singular verb) from heaven." He describes how in his dream the watcher says that Nebuchadnezzar will eat grass and be mad and that this punishment is "by the decree of the Watchers, the demand by the word of the Holy Ones" - "the living may know that the Most High rules in the kingdom of men." After hearing the king's dream Daniel considers for an hour and then responds: Lutheran Protestant reformer Johann Wigand viewed the watcher in Nebuchadnezzar's dream as either God himself, or the Son of God. The use of the term "Watchers" is common in the Book of Enoch. The chiefs of tens, listed in the Book of Enoch, are as follows:

Samael Samael (Hebrew: סמאל‎) (also Sammael or Samil) is an important archangel in Talmudic and post-Talmudic lore, a figure who is accuser, seducer and destroyer, and has been regarded as both good and evil. It is said that he was the guardian angel of Esau and a patron of the Roman empire. In Judaism[edit] In Jewish lore, Samael is said to be the angel of death, the chief ruler of the Fifth Heaven and one of the seven regents of the world served by two million angels; he resides in the Heaven. According to The Ascension of Moses[2] Samael is also mentioned as being in 7th Heaven: In the last heaven Moses saw two angels, each five hundred parasangs in height, forged out of chains of black fire and red fire, the angels Af, "Anger," and Hemah, "Wrath," whom God created at the beginning of the world, to execute His will. It is also said that the Baal Shem once summoned Samael, to make him do his bidding.[4] In Gnosticism[edit] In anthroposophy[edit] References[edit] Bunson, Matthew, (1996).

Black History Month Exhibition! Africans in India: From Slaves to Generals and Rulers Generals, commanders, admirals, prime ministers, and rulers, East Africans greatly distinguished themselves in India. They wrote a story unparalleled in the rest of the world — that of enslaved Africans attaining the pinnacle of military and political authority not only in a foreign country but also on another continent. Come discover their extraordinary story in a groundbreaking exhibition at the Schomburg Center — on view from February 1 to July 6 — and on March 21, join Dr. Following free traders and artisans who migrated to and traded with India, Sri Lanka and Malaysia in the fist centuries of the common era; from the 1300s onward, East Africans from Eritrea, Ethiopia, Somalia and adjacent areas entered the Indian subcontinent, mostly though the slave trade. Besides appearing in written documents, East Africans, known as Habshis (Abyssinians) and Sidis, have been immortalized in the rich paintings of different eras, states, and styles that form an important part of Indian culture.

Gabriel In Abrahamic religions, Gabriel (Hebrew: גַּבְרִיאֵל, Modern Gavri'el Tiberian Gaḇrîʼēl, God is my strength; Arabic: جبريل, Jibrīl or جبرائيل Jibrāʾīl) is an angel who typically serves as a messenger sent from God to certain people. In Islam, Gabriel (Jibra'il) is considered one of the four archangels whom God sent with his divine message to various prophets, including Muhammad.[6] The 96th chapter of the Quran, sura Al-Alaq, is believed by Muslims to be the first surah revealed by Gabriel to Muhammad. Judaism[edit] Gabriel is interpreted by the Rabbanim to be the "man in linen" in the Book of Daniel and the Book of Ezekiel. In the Book of Daniel, he is responsible for interpreting Daniel's visions. Gabriel's main function in Daniel is that of revealer, a role he continues in later literature.[7] In the Book of Ezekiel, Gabriel is understood to be the angel that was sent to destroy Jerusalem. In Kabbalah, Gabriel is identified with the sephirot of Yesod. Intertestamental literature[edit]

The Grigori The Watchers The Lord spoke: "Have no fear, Enoch, good man and scribe of goodness. Come hear my voice. (1 Enoch) In the early days after the Fall, before the demons had escaped from Hell and before the War had begun in earnest, the Seraphim Council debated long and long about how best to safeguard humanity. Seemingly in answer, God created the Grigori, the Eight Choir. The Grigori were truly the most "human" of angels. The Grigori were also the only angels who really felt comfortable on Earth, and who didn't mind staying there. It made them very, very effective at their jobs. The "Second Fall" In 11,600 B.C., it came to the attention of Heaven that the Grigori had become entirely too human; they had taken wives, started families, and some were even succumbing to debauchery, immersing themselves in corporeal pleasures. Servitors of Uriel and David rounded up the Watchers and brought them before Dominic for judgment. The Grigori Today No one knows how many Grigori are still alive. Resonance

Introduction to alchemy What exactly is alchemy? We have all been presented with the rather romanticised view of the venerable old alchemical philosopher huddling over his flasks of bubbling liquid immersed in his quest for the elusive philosophers' stone, a mere grain of which will change a mass of molten lead into the purest form of gold. This image of the alchemist was one which developed relatively early on in the history of alchemy, but it became a very popular view in the 20th century and to most people this is almost all they know about the subject. Another view that developed was that alchemists were mysterious adepts belonging to some secret society and exchanging messages in a coded form. So how should we view alchemy? How is alchemy approached today? Some people today still actually try and perform alchemical experiments. Most people who take an interest in alchemy use it as a source of philosophical and esoteric ideas, to support the particular belief system to which they have attached themselves.

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